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Re: VM thermometer placement

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  • gnikomson2000
    ... I m not a fan (pardon the pun) of air cooled reflux (overhead) condensers. I think they are way too bulky and inefficient for that purpose. There are
    Message 1 of 18 , Dec 8, 2009
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@...> wrote:
      > >
      > Thanks Harry,
      >
      > That puts my, sometimes, over analytical mind at ease. Time to start tinkering with all the bits and bobs now. Have you ever built and air cooled reflux condenser? That is the next aspect I am trying to address, tried and true liquid cooling is always available. Just curious.
      >
      > Slainte,
      > Kevin
      >


      I'm not a fan (pardon the pun) of air cooled reflux (overhead) condensers. I think they are way too bulky and inefficient for that purpose. There are much smaller and more efficient liquid coolant condensers you can use (and cheaper in materials too).

      However, I do acknowledge that they work (of course they do), and I also realise they may be a preference in very cold climates where water is problematic (iceing up etc) and cold air is free.

      Riku is the person to consult on air cooling (it's bloody COLD where he is <BG> ). He's got a file in my Library you can use as a primer...
      http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Simple_Low_cost_Stills/

      He also has a book published which you may find useful...
      http://www.amphora-society.com/Designing-and-Building-Automatic-Stills--by-Riku_p_0-3.html

      ...or wait for him to see this thread.


      HTH

      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • abbababbaccc
      Air cooled condensers are easy, convector pipes on top of the column work just fine and have no moving parts to break. If you want to make them less bulky add
      Message 2 of 18 , Dec 8, 2009
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        Air cooled condensers are easy, convector pipes on top of the column work just fine and have no moving parts to break. If you want to make them less bulky add fans to blow some air through, that way you can shorten them considerably. They can knock down considerable effect as well, I recently built a 2kW version that almost could handle 3kW. The challenge is to build easy to DIY product condenser. I have some plans to use copper spiral in a shroud for that purpose, if I just can find time to build one.

        Slainte, Riku

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gnikomson2000" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > I'm not a fan (pardon the pun) of air cooled reflux (overhead) condensers. I think they are way too bulky and inefficient for that purpose. There are much smaller and more efficient liquid coolant condensers you can use (and cheaper in materials too).
        >
        > However, I do acknowledge that they work (of course they do), and I also realise they may be a preference in very cold climates where water is problematic (iceing up etc) and cold air is free.
        >
        > Riku is the person to consult on air cooling (it's bloody COLD where he is <BG> ). He's got a file in my Library you can use as a primer...
        > http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Simple_Low_cost_Stills/
        >
        > He also has a book published which you may find useful...
        > http://www.amphora-society.com/Designing-and-Building-Automatic-Stills--by-Riku_p_0-3.html
        >
        > ...or wait for him to see this thread.
        >
        >
        > HTH
        >
        > Slainte!
        > regards Harry
        >
      • nwvapors66
        Thanks for the input, I live in the Northwest region of the U.S. and a passive air cooled condenser is quite feasible, especially in the winter months. I guess
        Message 3 of 18 , Dec 9, 2009
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          Thanks for the input, I live in the Northwest region of the U.S. and a passive air cooled condenser is quite feasible, especially in the winter months. I guess I need to figure out how many watts I am generating at the condenser. I am sure there has to be a calculator somewhere within this sight that will make this possible. Again thank you.

          Slainte,
          Kevin

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
          >
          > Air cooled condensers are easy, convector pipes on top of the column work just fine and have no moving parts to break. If you want to make them less bulky add fans to blow some air through, that way you can shorten them considerably. They can knock down considerable effect as well, I recently built a 2kW version that almost could handle 3kW. The challenge is to build easy to DIY product condenser. I have some plans to use copper spiral in a shroud for that purpose, if I just can find time to build one.
          >
          > Slainte, Riku
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gnikomson2000" <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > I'm not a fan (pardon the pun) of air cooled reflux (overhead) condensers. I think they are way too bulky and inefficient for that purpose. There are much smaller and more efficient liquid coolant condensers you can use (and cheaper in materials too).
          > >
          > > However, I do acknowledge that they work (of course they do), and I also realise they may be a preference in very cold climates where water is problematic (iceing up etc) and cold air is free.
          > >
          > > Riku is the person to consult on air cooling (it's bloody COLD where he is <BG> ). He's got a file in my Library you can use as a primer...
          > > http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Simple_Low_cost_Stills/
          > >
          > > He also has a book published which you may find useful...
          > > http://www.amphora-society.com/Designing-and-Building-Automatic-Stills--by-Riku_p_0-3.html
          > >
          > > ...or wait for him to see this thread.
          > >
          > >
          > > HTH
          > >
          > > Slainte!
          > > regards Harry
          > >
          >
        • nwvapors66
          Thanks for the input, I live in the Northwest region of the U.S. and a passive air cooled condenser is quite feasible, especially in the winter months. I guess
          Message 4 of 18 , Dec 9, 2009
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            Thanks for the input, I live in the Northwest region of the U.S. and a passive air cooled condenser is quite feasible, especially in the winter months. I guess I need to figure out how many watts I am generating at the condenser. I am sure there has to be a calculator somewhere within this sight that will make this possible. Again thank you.

            Slainte,
            Kevin

            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
            >
            > Air cooled condensers are easy, convector pipes on top of the column work just fine and have no moving parts to break. If you want to make them less bulky add fans to blow some air through, that way you can shorten them considerably. They can knock down considerable effect as well, I recently built a 2kW version that almost could handle 3kW. The challenge is to build easy to DIY product condenser. I have some plans to use copper spiral in a shroud for that purpose, if I just can find time to build one.
            >
            > Slainte, Riku
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gnikomson2000" <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > I'm not a fan (pardon the pun) of air cooled reflux (overhead) condensers. I think they are way too bulky and inefficient for that purpose. There are much smaller and more efficient liquid coolant condensers you can use (and cheaper in materials too).
            > >
            > > However, I do acknowledge that they work (of course they do), and I also realise they may be a preference in very cold climates where water is problematic (iceing up etc) and cold air is free.
            > >
            > > Riku is the person to consult on air cooling (it's bloody COLD where he is <BG> ). He's got a file in my Library you can use as a primer...
            > > http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Simple_Low_cost_Stills/
            > >
            > > He also has a book published which you may find useful...
            > > http://www.amphora-society.com/Designing-and-Building-Automatic-Stills--by-Riku_p_0-3.html
            > >
            > > ...or wait for him to see this thread.
            > >
            > >
            > > HTH
            > >
            > > Slainte!
            > > regards Harry
            > >
            >
          • nwvapors66
            ... Thanks Harry, I happen to live in the Northwest region of the U.S. and I think I could get away with a passive(no fan) air cooled condenser, especially in
            Message 5 of 18 , Dec 9, 2009
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              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gnikomson2000" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > Thanks Harry,
              > >
              > > That puts my, sometimes, over analytical mind at ease. Time to start tinkering with all the bits and bobs now. Have you ever built and air cooled reflux condenser? That is the next aspect I am trying to address, tried and true liquid cooling is always available. Just curious.
              > >
              > > Slainte,
              > > Kevin
              > >
              >
              >
              > I'm not a fan (pardon the pun) of air cooled reflux (overhead) condensers. I think they are way too bulky and inefficient for that purpose. There are much smaller and more efficient liquid coolant condensers you can use (and cheaper in materials too).
              >
              > However, I do acknowledge that they work (of course they do), and I also realise they may be a preference in very cold climates where water is problematic (iceing up etc) and cold air is free.
              >
              > Riku is the person to consult on air cooling (it's bloody COLD where he is <BG> ). He's got a file in my Library you can use as a primer...
              > http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Simple_Low_cost_Stills/
              >
              > He also has a book published which you may find useful...
              > http://www.amphora-society.com/Designing-and-Building-Automatic-Stills--by-Riku_p_0-3.html
              >
              > ...or wait for him to see this thread.
              >
              >
              > HTH
              >
              > Slainte!
              > regards Harry
              >
              Thanks Harry,

              I happen to live in the Northwest region of the U.S. and I think I could get away with a passive(no fan) air cooled condenser, especially in the winter months. Definitely would have to liquid cool in the summer though. Riku's designs are pretty impressive, I'll see if they can be adapted for my purpose. Again thank you.

              Slainte,
              Kevin
            • nwvapors66
              ... I have also been looking to use a simple copper coil for cooling product. I ll let you know what I come up with. Slainte, Kevin
              Message 6 of 18 , Dec 9, 2009
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                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
                >
                > Air cooled condensers are easy, convector pipes on top of the column work just fine and have no moving parts to break. If you want to make them less bulky add fans to blow some air through, that way you can shorten them considerably. They can knock down considerable effect as well, I recently built a 2kW version that almost could handle 3kW. The challenge is to build easy to DIY product condenser. I have some plans to use copper spiral in a shroud for that purpose, if I just can find time to build one.
                >
                > Slainte, Riku
                >

                I have also been looking to use a simple copper coil for cooling product. I'll let you know what I come up with.

                Slainte,
                Kevin


                > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gnikomson2000" <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > I'm not a fan (pardon the pun) of air cooled reflux (overhead) condensers. I think they are way too bulky and inefficient for that purpose. There are much smaller and more efficient liquid coolant condensers you can use (and cheaper in materials too).
                > >
                > > However, I do acknowledge that they work (of course they do), and I also realise they may be a preference in very cold climates where water is problematic (iceing up etc) and cold air is free.
                > >
                > > Riku is the person to consult on air cooling (it's bloody COLD where he is <BG> ). He's got a file in my Library you can use as a primer...
                > > http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Simple_Low_cost_Stills/
                > >
                > > He also has a book published which you may find useful...
                > > http://www.amphora-society.com/Designing-and-Building-Automatic-Stills--by-Riku_p_0-3.html
                > >
                > > ...or wait for him to see this thread.
                > >
                > >
                > > HTH
                > >
                > > Slainte!
                > > regards Harry
                > >
                >
              • Robert Hubble
                Hey Kevin, I ve got the same problem in the same place. My biggest hassle in this latest cold spell is thawing out my cooling-supply hose from the hose bib,
                Message 7 of 18 , Dec 9, 2009
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                  Hey Kevin,

                  I've got the same problem in the same place. My biggest hassle in this latest cold spell is thawing out my cooling-supply hose from the hose bib, and finding a place (consistently) warm enough to ferment reliably is a bitch, also.

                  For a potstiller, air-cooling is easier.

                  Ah, well, I love the green.

                  Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




                  To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  From: healeykb@...
                  Date: Wed, 9 Dec 2009 22:17:46 +0000
                  Subject: [Distillers] Re: VM thermometer placement

                   
                  Thanks for the input, I live in the Northwest region of the U.S. and a passive air cooled condenser is quite feasible, especially in the winter months. I guess I need to figure out how many watts I am generating at the condenser. I am sure there has to be a calculator somewhere within this sight that will make this possible. Again thank you.

                  Slainte,
                  Kevin


                  ---snip----


                  Windows Live Hotmail gives you a free,exclusive gift. Click here to download.
                • Kevin Healey
                  Luckily my basement stays a relatively consistent 65ish. This has served me well for beer brewing and I hope for mash as well. The bitch for me is carrying the
                  Message 8 of 18 , Dec 9, 2009
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                    Luckily my basement stays a relatively consistent 65ish. This has served me well for beer brewing and I hope for mash as well. The bitch for me is carrying the "beer" upstairs and out to the garage for distillation, oh well we all have to suffer for at at some point Right?

                    Slainte,
                    Kevin

                    On Wed, Dec 9, 2009 at 6:54 PM, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                     

                    Hey Kevin,

                    I've got the same problem in the same place. My biggest hassle in this latest cold spell is thawing out my cooling-supply hose from the hose bib, and finding a place (consistently) warm enough to ferment reliably is a bitch, also.

                    For a potstiller, air-cooling is easier.

                    Ah, well, I love the green.

                    Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




                    To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    From: healeykb@...
                    Date: Wed, 9 Dec 2009 22:17:46 +0000
                    Subject: [Distillers] Re: VM thermometer placement

                     
                    Thanks for the input, I live in the Northwest region of the U.S. and a passive air cooled condenser is quite feasible, especially in the winter months. I guess I need to figure out how many watts I am generating at the condenser. I am sure there has to be a calculator somewhere within this sight that will make this possible. Again thank you.

                    Slainte,
                    Kevin


                    ---snip----


                    Windows Live Hotmail gives you a free,exclusive gift. Click here to download.


                  • geoff
                    Hi Kevin, If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping
                    Message 9 of 18 , Dec 10, 2009
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                      Hi Kevin,

                           If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement.  You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs.  (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).   

                           Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable. 

                           Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container.  Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash.  Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub.  Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane. 

                           The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs.  Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif

                      Geoff  
                    • nwvapors66
                      ... Thanks for the tip Geoff, I ll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me. Thanks again, Slainte, Kevin
                      Message 10 of 18 , Dec 10, 2009
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                        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Hi Kevin,
                        >
                        > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
                        >
                        > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
                        >
                        > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
                        >
                        > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
                        >
                        > Geoff
                        >
                        Thanks for the tip Geoff,

                        I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
                        Thanks again,
                        Slainte,
                        Kevin
                      • geoff
                        Hi Kevin and guys, Seems like my tiny link doesn t work so try this tiny link http://tiny.cc/94UXr Geoff
                        Message 11 of 18 , Dec 10, 2009
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                          Hi Kevin and guys,

                                Seems like my tiny link doesn’t work so try this tiny link http://tiny.cc/94UXr

                          Geoff
                        • abbababbaccc
                          I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.
                          Message 12 of 18 , Dec 10, 2009
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                            I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.

                            Slainte, Riku

                            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@...> wrote:
                            >
                            >
                            >
                            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Hi Kevin,
                            > >
                            > > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
                            > >
                            > > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
                            > >
                            > > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
                            > >
                            > > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
                            > >
                            > > Geoff
                            > >
                            > Thanks for the tip Geoff,
                            >
                            > I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
                            > Thanks again,
                            > Slainte,
                            > Kevin
                            >
                          • nwvapors66
                            That would work fine, another thing to ponder. I am still working on air cooling my reflux. Do you know of a calculator/program to determine the energy at the
                            Message 13 of 18 , Dec 15, 2009
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                              That would work fine, another thing to ponder. I am still working on air cooling my reflux. Do you know of a calculator/program to determine the energy at the condenser? I am trying to decide on the # of finned tubes I will need, keep in mind I am an artist not a mathematician. Formulas sometimes make my eyes go crossed.

                              Slainte,
                              Kevin

                              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.
                              >
                              > Slainte, Riku
                              >
                              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@> wrote:
                              > >
                              > >
                              > >
                              > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
                              > > >
                              > > > Hi Kevin,
                              > > >
                              > > > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
                              > > >
                              > > > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
                              > > >
                              > > > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
                              > > >
                              > > > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
                              > > >
                              > > > Geoff
                              > > >
                              > > Thanks for the tip Geoff,
                              > >
                              > > I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
                              > > Thanks again,
                              > > Slainte,
                              > > Kevin
                              > >
                              >
                            • Michael
                              I know the latent heat to be removed for water is 970 BTUs per pound, plus add 1 BTU per degree F of sensible heat removed IE: going from 180 degrees to 65
                              Message 14 of 18 , Dec 15, 2009
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                                I know the latent heat to be removed for water is 970 BTUs per pound, plus add 1 BTU per degree F of sensible heat removed IE: going from 180 degrees to 65 degrees = 115.
                                115 + 970 = 1085 BTU per pound of water. 8.34 pounds of water in a gallon
                                Somewhere around ½ Ltr per pound

                                So to cool 180 degree steam to 65 degree liquid you would have to remove 1085 BTUs per ½ Liter

                                How much air needed to do that ???? I will look it up

                                Johnnie Sisco


                                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@...> wrote:
                                >
                                > That would work fine, another thing to ponder. I am still working on air cooling my reflux. Do you know of a calculator/program to determine the energy at the condenser? I am trying to decide on the # of finned tubes I will need, keep in mind I am an artist not a mathematician. Formulas sometimes make my eyes go crossed.
                                >
                                > Slainte,
                                > Kevin
                                >
                                > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@> wrote:
                                > >
                                > > I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.
                                > >
                                > > Slainte, Riku
                                > >
                                > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@> wrote:
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > >
                                > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Hi Kevin,
                                > > > >
                                > > > > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
                                > > > >
                                > > > > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
                                > > > >
                                > > > > Geoff
                                > > > >
                                > > > Thanks for the tip Geoff,
                                > > >
                                > > > I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
                                > > > Thanks again,
                                > > > Slainte,
                                > > > Kevin
                                > > >
                                > >
                                >
                              • Michael
                                Ok I have a formula 3 BTUs per 1 CFM of air moved across the coil with a 20 degree F. differential of the inlet to outlet air. Design for an A/C coil ...
                                Message 15 of 18 , Dec 15, 2009
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                                  Ok I have a formula 3 BTUs per 1 CFM of air moved across the coil with a 20 degree F.  differential of the inlet to outlet air.     Design for an A/C coil  


                                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  > That would work fine, another thing to ponder. I am still working on air cooling my reflux. Do you know of a calculator/program to determine the energy at the condenser? I am trying to decide on the # of finned tubes I will need, keep in mind I am an artist not a mathematician. Formulas sometimes make my eyes go crossed.
                                  >
                                  > Slainte,
                                  > Kevin
                                  >
                                  > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" abbababbaccc@ wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > > I suppose a cornelius keg would be quite perfect to for this application. You could even add an inline filter to the line to clear the mash at the same time.
                                  > >
                                  > > Slainte, Riku
                                  > >
                                  > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "nwvapors66" <healeykb@> wrote:
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > >
                                  > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "geoff" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Hi Kevin,
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > If you have a small compressor in your basement, or you could run a compressor hose to your basement. You can make light work of carrying/pumping your mash upstairs. (You could also use a filtered air supply from an over pressurized spare wheel).
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Please bear with me, Volkswagen used this method in their early post WW2 Volkswagen Beetles to pump water up to their car windscreen (from the over pressurized spare wheel in the trunk/boot in the front of the car) years before electric windscreen washers ever became fashionable.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Put your mash into a tightly air-sealed container. Put the compressed filtered inlet air supply from compressor in through the lid and into the air gap above your mash. Now put a siphon cane down through a good tight fitting rubber grommet through the lid and down into your mash, stopping about one inch above the container base or just above the settled mash/trub. Tighten and securely attach a hose to the siphon cane.
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > The filtered compressed air presses down upon the mash surface forcing the mash up the siphon cane near the base of the mash up into the hose and up stairs. Switch the compressor on and off (Don't over-pressurize the air gap) until all the mash is in your container upstairs. Mission accomplished and no back ache or spilt mash. Try this pdf in the files section link for a rough sketch http://tiny.cc/oEsif
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > > Geoff
                                  > > > >
                                  > > > Thanks for the tip Geoff,
                                  > > >
                                  > > > I'll check out the file you uploaded and see what I can figure out, It might work for me.
                                  > > > Thanks again,
                                  > > > Slainte,
                                  > > > Kevin
                                  > > >
                                  > >
                                  >

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