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Re: Baileys revisited

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  • waljaco
    It s the stuff that dries around the neck that can attract bacteria. Drink it fast or keep it in the fridge. wal
    Message 1 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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      It's the stuff that dries around the neck that can attract bacteria.
      Drink it fast or keep it in the fridge.
      wal

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Harry,
      > Now as you know I've made your recipe of Baileys which is brilliant and HWMBO thinks it great as do I. A few years back when I first started making it I started a thread about the shelf life but never really got any satisfactory answers.
      > Nice though it was I sort of lost interest in making it because of the short shelf life. There was a lot of suggestions as to what to do but it more or less boiled down to make and consume within X amount of days because the fresh cream would only last so long before it would go congealed and lumpy.
      > I have always had the Baileys recipe in the back of my mind thinking about a possible solution but until recently it has always just stayed there lurking. Now some one a few posts back suggested using "Coffee Mate" as a cream substitute in cream liqueurs
      > And the Baileys question jumped forward at me again. My reasoning being that when "Coffee Mate" is a dry product it has a long shelf life and when rehydrated with water and mixed say to a 20 % Abv instead of the 17 % Abv for the commercial Baileys. The higher 20 % Abv would be more than capable of keep the rehydrated "Coffee Mate" from going off. Yes/no?
      > Gawd knows what it would taste like with "Coffee Mate". But your thoughts or anyone else's thoughts for that matter would be appreciated as to the do-ability of this idea before I go ahead and maybe waste 500ml of good sippin' whiskey when some one might already have tried it.
      > Geoff
      >
    • Peers C
      Hya Geoff If you want my exact recipe I ll have to look it up when I get home but it is a matter of taste and I don t like things too sweet. I formulated it
      Message 2 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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        Hya Geoff

        If you want my exact recipe I'll have to look it up when I get home but it is a matter of taste and I don't like things too sweet. I formulated it after using one of the still spirits base packs and looking at the exact ingredients - bit more complicated than making a cup of coffee.

        I usually make up 1 1/2 litres at a time dissolve sugar, dextrose (corn syrup) and water into a syrup while hot add 1 1/2 cups of coffee mate and then chill in fridge until needed. Never had any go off. In fact I don't think it can go off if stored in the fridge owing to the high sugar / dextrose content and that's before any alcohol goes in it. Coffee Mate and the like are non dairy products and are actually sold to people who have lactose intolerances.

        The balance of sugar /dextrose is important because it affects the viscosity of the end result. To much sugar and you end up too sweet and syrupy - too much dextrose and the mix is thin and watery. Bare in mind that dextrose is only 70% as sweet as sugar.

        As regards taste - nigh on perfect

        Just as I side note I pot stilled an mango fermentation mixed with cream base and a touch of caramel - perfect amarula cream

        Cheers from Peers
      • burrows206
        Hi Peers, Yes please I do want your recipe if you don t mind digging it out. That would be just the dawgs bo**ocks and get me some brownie points into the
        Message 3 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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          Hi Peers,
          Yes please I do want your recipe if you don't mind digging it out.  That would be just the dawgs bo**ocks and get me some brownie points into the bargain from HWMBO.  I'm not to sure where to go or how to ask for dextrose or corn syrup in France or can I make them?.  I've very successfully made caramel from Mason or was it Trid's, directions off 'a the forum so direction I will be able follow if it's do-able. 
               I'm quit willing to let you spoon feed me on the French language here now Peers. Especially for the French names of things, as I know you are an accomplished reader and fluent speaker of French I'm not too proud to be the French village idiot in this case (in this case that would be a pissed Irish, French village idiot). 
               The dreaded Christmas thingy is just around the corner and Irish Coffee Cream under what ever name Baileys, Irish Mist, Peers Special Coffee Cream Reserve etc. they will make most excellent Christmas presents.  And making them now will allow the ingredients plenty of time to marry. Thanks in advance.
          Geoff  

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peers C" <peers_c@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hya Geoff
          >
          > If you want my exact recipe I'll have to look it up when I get home but it is a matter of taste and I don't like things too sweet. I formulated it after using one of the still spirits base packs and looking at the exact ingredients - bit more complicated than making a cup of coffee.
          >
          > I usually make up 1 1/2 litres at a time dissolve sugar, dextrose (corn syrup) and water into a syrup while hot add 1 1/2 cups of coffee mate and then chill in fridge until needed. Never had any go off. In fact I don't think it can go off if stored in the fridge owing to the high sugar / dextrose content and that's before any alcohol goes in it. Coffee Mate and the like are non dairy products and are actually sold to people who have lactose intolerances.
          >
          > The balance of sugar /dextrose is important because it affects the viscosity of the end result. To much sugar and you end up too sweet and syrupy - too much dextrose and the mix is thin and watery. Bare in mind that dextrose is only 70% as sweet as sugar.
          >
          > As regards taste - nigh on perfect
          >
          > Just as I side note I pot stilled an mango fermentation mixed with cream base and a touch of caramel - perfect amarula cream
          >
          > Cheers from Peers
          >
        • stooret
          i dont know about what Baileys uses but it is problably Ultra High-Pasteurized Milk... It is milk that does not require refrigeration and is shelf stable. Its
          Message 4 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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            i dont know about what Baileys uses but it is problably
            Ultra High-Pasteurized Milk... It is milk that does not require refrigeration and is shelf stable. Its the kind of milk that comes in small 1/2oz portions that just sit on counters at the fast food places but you can buy it. "Ultra High" not just "Ultra" is important.

            Hope this helps
            Stooret

            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi Harry,
            > Now as you know I've made your recipe of Baileys which is brilliant and HWMBO thinks it great as do I. A few years back when I first started making it I started a thread about the shelf life but never really got any satisfactory answers.
            > Nice though it was I sort of lost interest in making it because of the short shelf life. There was a lot of suggestions as to what to do but it more or less boiled down to make and consume within X amount of days because the fresh cream would only last so long before it would go congealed and lumpy.
            > I have always had the Baileys recipe in the back of my mind thinking about a possible solution but until recently it has always just stayed there lurking. Now some one a few posts back suggested using "Coffee Mate" as a cream substitute in cream liqueurs
            > And the Baileys question jumped forward at me again. My reasoning being that when "Coffee Mate" is a dry product it has a long shelf life and when rehydrated with water and mixed say to a 20 % Abv instead of the 17 % Abv for the commercial Baileys. The higher 20 % Abv would be more than capable of keep the rehydrated "Coffee Mate" from going off. Yes/no?
            > Gawd knows what it would taste like with "Coffee Mate". But your thoughts or anyone else's thoughts for that matter would be appreciated as to the do-ability of this idea before I go ahead and maybe waste 500ml of good sippin' whiskey when some one might already have tried it.
            > Geoff
            >
          • Peers C
            Don t worry to much about the dextrose - if you can t get it. Should get it in a pharmacy and it is the same as english. Corn Syrop is sirop de mais - But I
            Message 5 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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              Don't worry to much about the dextrose - if you can't get it. Should get it in a pharmacy and it is the same as english. Corn Syrop is sirop de mais - But I can't get that so never used.

              Coffee Mate Non-dairy creamer, original flavor 1 2/3 cups
              Table Sugar (sucrose) 8 Tbsp.
              Dextrose
              Water 1/4 cup + 1 Tbsp. 1 1/2 cups

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
              >
              > Hi Peers,
              > Yes please I do want your recipe if you don't mind digging it out.
              > That would be just the dawgs bo**ocks and get me some brownie points
              > into the bargain from HWMBO. I'm not to sure where to go or how to
              > ask for dextrose or corn syrup in France or can I make them?. I've
              > very successfully made caramel from Mason or was it Trid's,
              > directions off 'a the forum so direction I will be able follow if
              > it's do-able.
              > I'm quit willing to let you spoon feed me on the French
              > language here now Peers. Especially for the French names of things, as I
              > know you are an accomplished reader and fluent speaker of French I'm
              > not too proud to be the French village idiot in this case (in this case
              > that would be a pissed Irish, French village idiot).
              > The dreaded Christmas thingy is just around the corner and Irish
              > Coffee Cream under what ever name Baileys, Irish Mist, Peers Special
              > Coffee Cream Reserve etc. they will make most excellent Christmas
              > presents. And making them now will allow the ingredients plenty of time
              > to marry. Thanks in advance.
              > Geoff
              >
              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peers C" <peers_c@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Hya Geoff
              > >
              > > If you want my exact recipe I'll have to look it up when I get home
              > but it is a matter of taste and I don't like things too sweet. I
              > formulated it after using one of the still spirits base packs and
              > looking at the exact ingredients - bit more complicated than making a
              > cup of coffee.
              > >
              > > I usually make up 1 1/2 litres at a time dissolve sugar, dextrose
              > (corn syrup) and water into a syrup while hot add 1 1/2 cups of coffee
              > mate and then chill in fridge until needed. Never had any go off. In
              > fact I don't think it can go off if stored in the fridge owing to the
              > high sugar / dextrose content and that's before any alcohol goes in it.
              > Coffee Mate and the like are non dairy products and are actually sold to
              > people who have lactose intolerances.
              > >
              > > The balance of sugar /dextrose is important because it affects the
              > viscosity of the end result. To much sugar and you end up too sweet and
              > syrupy - too much dextrose and the mix is thin and watery. Bare in mind
              > that dextrose is only 70% as sweet as sugar.
              > >
              > > As regards taste - nigh on perfect
              > >
              > > Just as I side note I pot stilled an mango fermentation mixed with
              > cream base and a touch of caramel - perfect amarula cream
              > >
              > > Cheers from Peers
              > >
              >
            • Peers C
              Don t worry to much about the dextrose - if you can t get it. Should get it in a pharmacy and it is the same as english. Corn Syrop is sirop de mais - But I
              Message 6 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                Don't worry to much about the dextrose - if you can't get it. Should get it in a pharmacy and it is the same as english. Corn Syrop is sirop de mais - But I can't get that so never tried it.

                Coffee Mate Non-dairy creamer, 1 2/3 cups
                Table Sugar (sucrose) 8 Tbsp.
                Dextrose 3 Tbsp.
                Water 1 1/2 cups

                Bring water, sugar and dextrose to the boil for one minute allow to cool slightly, whisk in the coffee mate.

                If you can't get the dextrose just increase the sugar to taste. If you can get the corn syrup then reduce the water a bit.

                Sorry can't be more precise but like I said it's a matter of taste. One thing is for sure you won't be dissapointed you might like to refine it a bit to suite - but you'll finish it long before it goes off.

                Cheers from Peers
              • rye_junkie1
                ... Got a minute to jump in on this. I am a Baileys fan also. I never had any luck using cream and it always separated out no matter what I did. I make my
                Message 7 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peers C" <peers_c@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Don't worry to much about the dextrose - if you can't get it. Should get it in a pharmacy and it is the same as english. Corn Syrop is sirop de mais - But I can't get that so never tried it.
                  >
                  > Coffee Mate Non-dairy creamer, 1 2/3 cups
                  > Table Sugar (sucrose) 8 Tbsp.
                  > Dextrose 3 Tbsp.
                  > Water 1 1/2 cups
                  >
                  > Bring water, sugar and dextrose to the boil for one minute allow to cool slightly, whisk in the coffee mate.
                  >
                  > If you can't get the dextrose just increase the sugar to taste. If you can get the corn syrup then reduce the water a bit.
                  >
                  > Sorry can't be more precise but like I said it's a matter of taste. One thing is for sure you won't be dissapointed you might like to refine it a bit to suite - but you'll finish it long before it goes off.
                  >
                  > Cheers from Peers
                  >


                  Got a minute to jump in on this. I am a Baileys fan also. I never had any luck using cream and it always separated out no matter what I did. I make my Baileys knock off using Sweetened Condensed Milk.
                  http://tinyurl.com/6sgxn7
                  I have posted the recipe on new distillers a couple of times.
                  From fuzzy memory it is:
                  1 can of sweetened condensed Milk
                  2 cups of irish whisky. I use essenced neutral
                  1 tbsp vanilla extract
                  1/4 tsp Almond extract
                  1 or 2 tbsp Hersheys choclate syrup
                  1 tbsp instant coffee
                  I think thats it.
                  You may have trouble finding some of this overseas. Its a good recipe and i have had it keep for a month or so in the fridge.
                  Usually it only last a week though before being consumed.
                  The recipe is on the door of my fridge. I will check it when i get home and repost if necessary.

                  Mason
                • burrows206
                  Hi Peers, Thanks for the clarification and the How to on the recipe. I like to put a label on my bottles with a date, % Abv and it s name etc. usually named
                  Message 8 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                    Hi Peers,

                     Thanks for the clarification and the "How to" on the recipe. I like to put a label on my bottles with a date,  % Abv and it's name etc. usually named and connected  after the source I found it.  So I think I'll label it up as Peers Special Coffee Cream Reserve

                     20 % abv

                    Geoff   

                     

                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peers C" <peers_c@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > Don't worry to much about the dextrose - if you can't get it. Should get it in a pharmacy and it is the same as english. Corn Syrop is sirop de mais - But I can't get that so never tried it.
                    >
                    > Coffee Mate Non-dairy creamer, 1 2/3 cups
                    > Table Sugar (sucrose) 8 Tbsp.
                    > Dextrose 3 Tbsp.
                    > Water 1 1/2 cups
                    >
                    > Bring water, sugar and dextrose to the boil for one minute allow to cool slightly, whisk in the coffee mate.
                    >
                    > If you can't get the dextrose just increase the sugar to taste. If you can get the corn syrup then reduce the water a bit.
                    >
                    > Sorry can't be more precise but like I said it's a matter of taste. One thing is for sure you won't be dissapointed you might like to refine it a bit to suite - but you'll finish it long before it goes off.
                    >
                    > Cheers from Peers
                    >

                  • burrows206
                    Hi Mason, I ve tried the condensed milk route and it worked really fine but I was so worried that the same thing would happen as with the fresh cream approach
                    Message 9 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                      Hi Mason,
                      I've tried the condensed milk route and it worked really fine but I was so worried that the same thing would happen as with the fresh cream approach it made me extremely reluctant to give any bottles away as a Christmas presents but as you say it also is an excellent recipe
                      Geoff

                      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peers C" <peers_c@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Don't worry to much about the dextrose - if you can't get it. Should get it in a pharmacy and it is the same as english. Corn Syrop is sirop de mais - But I can't get that so never tried it.
                      > >
                      > > Coffee Mate Non-dairy creamer, 1 2/3 cups
                      > > Table Sugar (sucrose) 8 Tbsp.
                      > > Dextrose 3 Tbsp.
                      > > Water 1 1/2 cups
                      > >
                      > > Bring water, sugar and dextrose to the boil for one minute allow to cool slightly, whisk in the coffee mate.
                      > >
                      > > If you can't get the dextrose just increase the sugar to taste. If you can get the corn syrup then reduce the water a bit.
                      > >
                      > > Sorry can't be more precise but like I said it's a matter of taste. One thing is for sure you won't be dissapointed you might like to refine it a bit to suite - but you'll finish it long before it goes off.
                      > >
                      > > Cheers from Peers
                      > >
                      >
                      >
                      > Got a minute to jump in on this. I am a Baileys fan also. I never had any luck using cream and it always separated out no matter what I did. I make my Baileys knock off using Sweetened Condensed Milk.
                      > http://tinyurl.com/6sgxn7
                      > I have posted the recipe on new distillers a couple of times.
                      > From fuzzy memory it is:
                      > 1 can of sweetened condensed Milk
                      > 2 cups of irish whisky. I use essenced neutral
                      > 1 tbsp vanilla extract
                      > 1/4 tsp Almond extract
                      > 1 or 2 tbsp Hersheys choclate syrup
                      > 1 tbsp instant coffee
                      > I think thats it.
                      > You may have trouble finding some of this overseas. Its a good recipe and i have had it keep for a month or so in the fridge.
                      > Usually it only last a week though before being consumed.
                      > The recipe is on the door of my fridge. I will check it when i get home and repost if necessary.
                      >
                      > Mason
                      >
                    • Peat Reek
                      ... I was thinking along the lines of Pete s Scotch Cream but would put a Use by 2010/01/01 on the label if I made it the week of/before Christmas.
                      Message 10 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                        > reluctant to give any bottles away as a Christmas presents
                         
                        I was thinking along the lines of 'Pete's Scotch Cream' but would put a 'Use by 2010/01/01' on the label if I made it the week of/before Christmas.
                         

                      • burrows206
                        Hi Mason, The site of that can Nestles Carnation can on that link you supplied , brings back a lot of old army memories of tours in N. Ireland in the 70 s
                        Message 11 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                          Hi Mason,

                            The site of that can Nestles Carnation can on that link you supplied , brings back a lot of old army memories of tours in N. Ireland in the 70's drinking super sweet coffee from a flask on crappy cold wet  N. Ireland winter nights out on patrol in Saricen armoured vehicles our bloody multi coloured splashed pigs.  We also busted a few illegal still sites under the direction of the N. Ireland police escort (from tip off's of people acting suspiciously and all that stuff) we had to bring the police along with us in order to arrest anyone if need be. 

                               With us being young horney and just out to enjoy ourselves (as you do at the age of 18years old) we usually prevailed upon the cop at the illegal still site to turn a blind eye and drop the charges and we got the poteen horde and then there was no evidence to prosecute the poor guy with and boy it disappeared fast.  The poteen maker was just glad he didn't get fined we were glad because we were getting some of the most beautiful (sometimes beautiful) Mountain Dew to be had in N. Ireland.  Gawd I can still remember the hangovers.  We had to share it out with the sargents' and officers mess but we are talking gallons of the stuff here so why not ( they always wanted the authentic poteen at their mess functions so any finds of poteen did a civilian cop a good promottion service as he would accelerate up through the ranks from glowing reports from the army Snco's and officer class    

                               The cop, well he usually got pissed with the rest of us and didn't have a charge sheet to file so everything worked out good for everyone one way or another.  

                               It wasn't always super serious in N. Ireland ya know, we had some bloody good laughs and some really funny situations with the civilians.

                               And we would look the opposite way when we thought if given the same situation, and if the shoe were on the other foot and we would like to get one over on the cops ourselves, what would we like someone to do.

                               And so it went we made friends, lost friends but on the whole it was just a good job when a large chunk of the UK was unemployed and I was working  at a job I enjoyed (And frig the politics to me it was a well paid job with a hell've a lot of cheap booze, holidays and cigarettes.  What was important to you at 18 years old).  

                          Geoff        

                          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "rye_junkie1" <rye_junkie@...> wrote:
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Peers C" peers_c@ wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Don't worry to much about the dextrose - if you can't get it. Should get it in a pharmacy and it is the same as english. Corn Syrop is sirop de mais - But I can't get that so never tried it.
                          > >
                          > > Coffee Mate Non-dairy creamer, 1 2/3 cups
                          > > Table Sugar (sucrose) 8 Tbsp.
                          > > Dextrose 3 Tbsp.
                          > > Water 1 1/2 cups
                          > >
                          > > Bring water, sugar and dextrose to the boil for one minute allow to cool slightly, whisk in the coffee mate.
                          > >
                          > > If you can't get the dextrose just increase the sugar to taste. If you can get the corn syrup then reduce the water a bit.
                          > >
                          > > Sorry can't be more precise but like I said it's a matter of taste. One thing is for sure you won't be dissapointed you might like to refine it a bit to suite - but you'll finish it long before it goes off.
                          > >
                          > > Cheers from Peers
                          > >
                          >
                          >
                          > Got a minute to jump in on this. I am a Baileys fan also. I never had any luck using cream and it always separated out no matter what I did. I make my Baileys knock off using Sweetened Condensed Milk.
                          > http://tinyurl.com/6sgxn7
                          > I have posted the recipe on new distillers a couple of times.
                          > From fuzzy memory it is:
                          > 1 can of sweetened condensed Milk
                          > 2 cups of irish whisky. I use essenced neutral
                          > 1 tbsp vanilla extract
                          > 1/4 tsp Almond extract
                          > 1 or 2 tbsp Hersheys choclate syrup
                          > 1 tbsp instant coffee
                          > I think thats it.
                          > You may have trouble finding some of this overseas. Its a good recipe and i have had it keep for a month or so in the fridge.
                          > Usually it only last a week though before being consumed.
                          > The recipe is on the door of my fridge. I will check it when i get home and repost if necessary.
                          >
                          > Mason
                          >
                        • gnikomson2000
                          ... ,SNIP ... Geoff, Homogenization is what Baileys do. With vege oil & cream. A few experiments with a blender may be worth a try... The alcohol
                          Message 12 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206" <jeffrey.burrows@> wrote:
                            > >
                            > > Hi Harry,
                            > > Now as you know I've made your recipe of Baileys which is brilliant and HWMBO thinks it great as do I. A few years back when I first started making it I started a thread about the shelf life but never really got any satisfactory answers.
                            > > Nice though it was I sort of lost interest in making it because of the short shelf life. There was a lot of suggestions as to what to do but it more or less boiled down to make and consume within X amount of days because the fresh cream would only last so long before it would go congealed and lumpy.
                            ,SNIP>

                            > > Geoff


                            Geoff,

                            Homogenization is what Baileys do. With vege oil & cream. A few experiments with a blender may be worth a try...

                            <extract>
                            The alcohol in Baileys is produced from a bacterial fermentation of whey. The cream and alcohol, together with some whiskey are homogenized to form an emulsion, with the aid of an emulsifier containing refined vegetable oil. This process prevents separation of the whiskey and cream during storage.

                            According to the manufacturer, Baileys has a shelf life of 24 months. It should be stored between 5 and 35 degrees Celsius, or 41 to 95 degrees Fahrenheit
                            </extract>
                            [Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Baileys_Irish_Cream%5d


                            Slainte!
                            regards Harry
                          • Geoff
                            Hi, folks, Following a comment from, I think, waljaco, quite some time ago, I plan to package cream liqueurs in those glass fruit juice bottles with a wide
                            Message 13 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                              Hi, folks,

                              Following a comment from, I think, waljaco, quite some time ago, I plan to package cream liqueurs in those glass fruit juice bottles with a wide neck. With a nice personal label.

                              One of the main reasons for a shortish life-after-opening for cream liqueurs is that the cream builds up in the narrow neck of a normal bottle, above the level of the alcohol, and it goes 'off'.
                              The wide neck bottle nearly eliminates this situation and also makes it easy to wipe inside the neck, say with a cotton ball and a bit of spirit, as you put the bottle away
                              (INTO THE REFRIGERATOR ?)
                              after the serving session.
                              Simple.

                              And the smaller bottles would be ideal, 250 ml?
                              You have reduced your after-opening keeping problems to one-third right there, and possibly even eliminated them.

                              As for shelf life before opening, Harry suggested using that 'long-life' cream, IIRC. Might eliminate the lumps? And should improve the keeping qualities in general.

                              And by the way, no-one appears to have suggested this but it seems to make sense; suppose you have everything in the bottle EXCEPT THE CREAM, and make a bit of a production of adding the cream as you serve?
                              Blend it in or swirl it through, pour it on top or whatever.
                              It should work for any cream liqueur.
                              No keeping problems.
                              Call this one 'Geoff's Essence of Irish Cream'.

                              I haven't tried the cream liqueurs yet but I am looking forward to it.
                              The limoncello is really nice to drink though not as delicate as the traditional one (maybe next time) and I am going to make Amaretto with apricot kernels when I have enough good spirit. Soon. I've cracked all the stones.

                              Regards,

                              The Baker

                              P.S. If 'Coffee Mate' is that artificial 'whitener' stuff it sounds horrible! G.

                              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
                              >
                              > Hi Harry,
                              > Now as you know I've made your recipe of Baileys which is brilliant and HWMBO thinks it great as do I. A few years back when I first started making it I started a thread about the shelf life but never really got any satisfactory answers.
                              > Nice though it was I sort of lost interest in making it because of the short shelf life. There was a lot of suggestions as to what to do but it more or less boiled down to make and consume within X amount of days because the fresh cream would only last so long before it would go congealed and lumpy.
                              > I have always had the Baileys recipe in the back of my mind thinking about a possible solution but until recently it has always just stayed there lurking. Now some one a few posts back suggested using "Coffee Mate" as a cream substitute in cream liqueurs
                              > And the Baileys question jumped forward at me again. My reasoning being that when "Coffee Mate" is a dry product it has a long shelf life and when rehydrated with water and mixed say to a 20 % Abv instead of the 17 % Abv for the commercial Baileys. The higher 20 % Abv would be more than capable of keep the rehydrated "Coffee Mate" from going off. Yes/no?
                              > Gawd knows what it would taste like with "Coffee Mate". But your thoughts or anyone else's thoughts for that matter would be appreciated as to the do-ability of this idea before I go ahead and maybe waste 500ml of good sippin' whiskey when some one might already have tried it.
                              > Geoff
                              >
                            • gnikomson2000
                              ... Biggest problem there is...........if you add the cream to the alcohol, it will curdle. If you add the alcohol to the cream (slowly & stir in), it s fine.
                              Message 14 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Geoff" <gff_stwrt@...> wrote:
                                >
                                >
                                >
                                > And by the way, no-one appears to have suggested this but it seems to make sense; suppose you have everything in the bottle EXCEPT THE CREAM, and make a bit of a production of adding the cream as you serve?
                                > Blend it in or swirl it through, pour it on top or whatever.
                                > It should work for any cream liqueur.
                                > No keeping problems.
                                > Call this one 'Geoff's Essence of Irish Cream'.



                                Biggest problem there is...........if you add the cream to the alcohol, it will curdle. If you add the alcohol to the cream (slowly & stir in), it's fine.

                                Reason is that a small amount of dairy (the first drops or spoonsful) in a large amount of alcohol will sour the dairy as it's added. Similar thing happens to your stomach when you've got lots of acid (hydrochloric) and you swallow milk. You throw up leathery curdled lumps.
                                Conversely, adding small amounts of alcohol (Baileys is 17% v/v total) to larger amounts of dairy as the base, avoids this 'souring' shock.

                                Slainte!
                                regards Harry
                              • UMRYKADIN
                                Jambo to all, Quite an interesting topic here, I would suggest honey blended with the condensed milk and 60% ABV alcohol in a blender. Honey and alcohol are
                                Message 15 of 17 , Nov 2, 2009
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                                  Jambo to all,

                                  Quite an interesting topic here, I would suggest honey blended with the condensed milk and 60% ABV alcohol in a blender. Honey and alcohol are good preservatives, however the aesthetic appeal hopefully would not be compromised when the ingredients separate after a few hours of refrigeration: Experimentation would give us better results.

                                  Best Regards,

                                  Christopher






                                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gnikomson2000" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Geoff" <gff_stwrt@> wrote:
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > >
                                  > > And by the way, no-one appears to have suggested this but it seems to make sense; suppose you have everything in the bottle EXCEPT THE CREAM, and make a bit of a production of adding the cream as you serve?
                                  > > Blend it in or swirl it through, pour it on top or whatever.
                                  > > It should work for any cream liqueur.
                                  > > No keeping problems.
                                  > > Call this one 'Geoff's Essence of Irish Cream'.
                                  >
                                  >
                                  >
                                  > Biggest problem there is...........if you add the cream to the alcohol, it will curdle. If you add the alcohol to the cream (slowly & stir in), it's fine.
                                  >
                                  > Reason is that a small amount of dairy (the first drops or spoonsful) in a large amount of alcohol will sour the dairy as it's added. Similar thing happens to your stomach when you've got lots of acid (hydrochloric) and you swallow milk. You throw up leathery curdled lumps.
                                  > Conversely, adding small amounts of alcohol (Baileys is 17% v/v total) to larger amounts of dairy as the base, avoids this 'souring' shock.
                                  >
                                  > Slainte!
                                  > regards Harry
                                  >
                                • Geoff
                                  Thanks, Harry, It definitely sounds like a possibility then, so long as you add the alcohol carefully to the cream. Regards, The Baker
                                  Message 16 of 17 , Nov 3, 2009
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                                    Thanks, Harry,
                                    It definitely sounds like a possibility then, so long as you add the alcohol carefully to the cream.

                                    Regards,

                                    The Baker

                                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gnikomson2000" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Geoff" <gff_stwrt@> wrote:
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > >
                                    > > And by the way, no-one appears to have suggested this but it seems to make sense; suppose you have everything in the bottle EXCEPT THE CREAM, and make a bit of a production of adding the cream as you serve?
                                    > > Blend it in or swirl it through, pour it on top or whatever.
                                    > > It should work for any cream liqueur.
                                    > > No keeping problems.
                                    > > Call this one 'Geoff's Essence of Irish Cream'.
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > Biggest problem there is...........if you add the cream to the alcohol, it will curdle. If you add the alcohol to the cream (slowly & stir in), it's fine.
                                    >
                                    > Reason is that a small amount of dairy (the first drops or spoonsful) in a large amount of alcohol will sour the dairy as it's added. Similar thing happens to your stomach when you've got lots of acid (hydrochloric) and you swallow milk. You throw up leathery curdled lumps.
                                    > Conversely, adding small amounts of alcohol (Baileys is 17% v/v total) to larger amounts of dairy as the base, avoids this 'souring' shock.
                                    >
                                    > Slainte!
                                    > regards Harry
                                    >
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