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Re: Limoncello

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  • ortholaan
    Hi Paul. Before taking the peal off, scrub the fruit (mandarins, lemon or oranges are all alike) with hot water and sodiumcarbonate. This will solve the
    Message 1 of 55 , Oct 13, 2009
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      Hi Paul.

      Before taking the peal off, scrub the fruit (mandarins, lemon or oranges are all alike) with hot water and sodiumcarbonate.
      This will solve the waxlayer of the peal and the finished product will be much easier to clear and more pure of taste.

      Gr, Ko.



      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Paul Smith <praxis178@...> wrote:
      >
      > Ok, this is going from memory (I moved house twice since I started and have lost the actual recipe)....
      >  
      > This is for 2L...
      >  
      > Take the peal* of three mandarins and soak in ~500ml of 190proof spirit (either grain or fruit, I used grape) for 2-3weeks you'll know it's ready when the colour is all gone, don't do like I did and move house and forget which box the jar was in for 3.... years! I don't think the extra time did it any favours! *NO PITH!!!!
      >  
      > After you get rid of the peal add a further 500ml of 190 spirit to the flavour and leave for a week or so (don't know if this is really important, but I did anyway), at this point you can dilute it down to 40% ABV and sweeten to taste (I added 250g of white sugar as syrop), the final ABV "should" be ~37%, but with mine because it was like milk I added some extra spirit to clear it up some, but gave up when I estimate I hit 50%ABV.
      >  
      > Incidentally although it was cloudy this morning, it isn't now and all I can put it down to is that today it got to 32C in the living room.... A white wax like crust has formed in the surface of the liquere so the change might be permament, time will tell I guess. Still tastes very mandariny, maybe a bit smoother, but that could just be time in bottle speaking.
      >  
      > P.
      >
      > --- On Tue, 13/10/09, Mark Wabster <ozwab2001@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Mark Wabster <ozwab2001@...>
      > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: Limoncello
      > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > Received: Tuesday, 13 October, 2009, 4:12 AM
      >
      >
      >  
      >
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      > Paul,
      >
      > I'd love to have that mandarin liqueur recipe if you'd care to share it.
      >
      > We make a great limoncello to our tastes and I'd like to see the process for the mandarin one,
      >
      > Cheerz Ozwab.
      >
      > --- On Tue, 13/10/09, Paul Smith <praxis178@yahoo. com.au> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: Paul Smith <praxis178@yahoo. com.au>
      > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: Limoncello
      > To: Distillers@yahoogro ups.com
      > Received: Tuesday, 13 October, 2009, 10:32 AM
      >
      >
      >  
      >
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      >
      > Putting aside that I know a guy who was on the Eldridge at the time of the "event" your cloudy Limoncello won't clear with time it's the oils from the lemon that are causing the haze.
      >  
      > If you were to raise the ABV to ~40% I bet it would clear though, I have some mandarin liquere made to a VERY old recipe that is hazy too, but at 50%ABV! So you can imagine just how tasty it is. <grin> Actually we only use in mixed drinks as it's just a tad too "flavourful" for modern tastes....
      >  
      > P.
      >
      > --- On Mon, 12/10/09, burrows206 <jeffrey.burrows@ orange.fr> wrote:
      >
      >
      > From: burrows206 <jeffrey.burrows@ orange.fr>
      > Subject: [Distillers] Re: Limoncello
      > To: Distillers@yahoogro ups.com
      > Received: Monday, 12 October, 2009, 8:52 PM
      >
      >
      >  
      >
      >
      >
      > Hi MW,
      > I believe "Ooselay ipslay inksay ipsshaythe" loosely translated is "I believe the concept of movable shadows is classified information. " And you being in the "other" in the Shetland Isles Shadow Cabinet must be Pinky I presume, with such classified isles code speak from the above opening line hee hee.
      > But if you were to know the whole truth I believe someone "the brain" maybe would take you out cause you'd know the truth about who really topped JFK or what really happened on the USS Eldridge in July 1943 and grand "world domination" plan that succeeds in the next exciting episode next week but hey that's above top secret.
      > You see what takes place Harry when I only wanted to know about alcohol and water freezing points of heavy water.
      > Anyway getting back to the subject of Limoncello. I diluted it to 35 % Abv with mineral water and it seems to have gone cloudy but it still tastes fine I know it will get better.
      > Will it settle out clear. Will the lower temperature, if I put it in the freezer maybe facilitate a better mix of mineral water, lemon and the 95 % Alcohol make it go clear until such times as it warms back up to ambient room temperature?
      > Geoff
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups..com, M W <rd232d@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Geoff,
      > >
      > > Ooselay ipslay inksay ipsshay!
      > >
      > > Ixnay on mentioning the esearchnay!
      > >
      > > LOL
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
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    • waljaco
      Actually honey sweetness is equivalent to sucrose. Flower nectar is usually mostly diluted sucrose which is converted by bees to mainly glucose and fructose
      Message 55 of 55 , Jan 24, 2014
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        Actually honey sweetness is equivalent to sucrose.
        Flower nectar is usually mostly diluted sucrose which is converted by bees to mainly glucose and fructose and then concentrated by fanning to about 80% sugar content.

        http://food.oregonstate.edu/learn/faq/faq_sugar53.html

        wal
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