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Re: RUM DO 4. Well! Well1

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  • anthonyathawes
    Thank you for this, Harry. Knowing that yeast doesn t like to go much above 25 C has always made me wonder, though some advocate re-hydration of the yeast at
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 28 4:59 AM
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      Thank you for this, Harry.

      Knowing that yeast doesn't like to go much above 25 C has always made me wonder, though some advocate re-hydration of the yeast at 32 C before fermentation.

      I have tried to remember what happened, two years ago, when a green and white mold developed on some Dunder left outside. Unfortunately it was so ugly I ditched it, but I'm pretty sure it had been taken up to 98 C during fermentation, and then just left. As you say, any yeast would have been killed off, so perhaps it just went off like old meat. Conceivably, rotten though it was, perhaps it was a useful addition to Rum? Any opinions, please!

      Tony

      -- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@...> wrote:
      >
      > Well! Well! Well! Harry, I do believe you've hit the nail on the head! Why has it taken two years to find out the truth about treating Dunder to a temperature of 25 to 33 C? I had ploughed along making beer very successfully at 21 C and never drempt (or read) that Dunder neaded tropical conditions to generate further activity in Dunder. People all over Great Britain will be grateful for this revelation if there are any potential Rum makers out there - I've never heard from any.....
      >
      > Alex Costello, who just about lives on Devil's Island (Isle de Diable), nearly got there, but probably forgot that we have a generally cool climate and are unlikely to throw Dunder into an open pit to fester. God knows what other foreign bodies get in - sounds like our cider making! As a matter of interest, I had three half-filled Dunder Winchesters crack in the garden this Christmas due to ice.
      >
      > Back in 2007, due to a little hot weather a foul foam developed on some Dunder I'd left outside. It was so awful I threw it out. Sven (who I thought lived in Norway, commented that I'd thrown away the best bit - but not why!).
      >
      > So how should the mold be treated. My inclination is to shake it all up and put it all in the next fermentation: it should either be pure Dunder or the now effervescent, newly formed yeast derivative, so no harm should come. (Pinions please).
      >
      > I guess some Rum makers have laughed their socks off at my ignorance, though someone might have noticed that my email address is bt.internet.com, the bt standing for British Telecom, and that Oxfordshire is not a crocodile infested swamp basking uner a tropical sky.
      >
      > I really don't know if there are any English Rum makers about here - if there are, they keep a low profile. Customs and Excise are hardly interested in penny packets of amateurish rum and I imagine that goes for the rest of the World.
      >
      > To finalise, thank you very much for your help Harry - I was getting near to throwing in the sponge for something easier.. What I did make, though not being Rum, has turned out quite pleasantly, and is steadily going down with copious drafts of Diet Coca Cola. By the way, the Caramel made with sugar, lemon juice and water gained from the web, was very successful and well-worth adding for colour, but don't over-do it.
      >
      > Tony
      >
    • castillo.alex2008
      Hey Tony This days I haven´t been answering too many questions or doing much comments but I´ll take a chance this time. As I´ve seen you´ve been very
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 28 8:43 PM
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        Hey Tony

        This days I haven´t been answering too many questions or doing much comments but I´ll take a chance this time. As I´ve seen you´ve been very interested in getting an excellent rum, but it seems to me that you have failed in getting what you want. Sometimes getting things simple is the best way to achieve your goals. I suggest you forget about complex ways of getting extraordinary fancy flavors that, according to you evoke the best rums you´ve ever had. Just get 10 pounds of brown sugar, 1 liter of the best blackstrap molasses you can get, 1/4 cup of DAP as a source of nitrogen and 1/4 cup of an ester producing yeast (do get DANSTIL 493 EDV by Lallemand via Whitelabs in USA, it´ll cost you some bucks but worths every penny), Single Distill, Keeping lots of heads and tails, add honey, raisins, dilute to 65% ABV and age as much as you can (more than 6 months) and you´ll get a good rum. Let´s face it, it won´t be neither Bacardi 8 years nor Barceló Imperial, but will be a good rum you´ll be proud of and forget about aging dunder and asking for complex methods for getting "the rum of your dreams". The best way to spell the perfection you´re looking for is this: P A R A L Y S I S; which is what your getting.

        P.D. I don´t live at or near to any "Devil´s Island" in fact this is an island but is one loved by God.


        Prepare your rum and be happy. (As I prepare my whisky knowing is not Diageo´s Johnnie Walker blue label)

        Alex
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