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Re: RUM DO 3 (lumpy black hairy bits)

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  • waljaco
    Rafael Arroyo suggests introducing Clostridium saccharobutyricum into the fermenter. The bacteria was found in and isolated from sugar cane bagasse. The acids
    Message 1 of 16 , Mar 25, 2009
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      Rafael Arroyo suggests introducing Clostridium saccharobutyricum into the fermenter.
      The bacteria was found in and isolated from sugar cane bagasse.
      The acids produced by this bacteria form esters with the usual alcohols in yeast fermenting media, particularly butyric acid eaters.
      Sabina Maza-Gomez added Propionibacterium thoenii and Clostridium propionicum to rum stillage.

      wal

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "burrows206" <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hi Harry,
      > When you have a good fungal growth at the height of summer in UK (such as it is). Is the local variant of fungal infection (remember it's dunder we're talking about guys not the local night life) distributed throughout the entire batch of dunder,(top to bottom, front to back) in the same way that ethanol is distributed throughout the entire wash.
      > Assuming this is so, the showy grotesque hairy growth on top of the dunder is really the showroom for the fungi. This is where I think a lot of people are having the problem in today's modern hygienic society.
      > Upon opening the lid they are confronted with something that looks like "it" would just need the electric heart "jump leads" to bring "it" into moving life again. The first impulse is get "it" down the drain and fast. I can't smell a thing but I'm sure the smell might not be that pleasant either. When you've got yourself past this initial reaction, and you've talked yourself into using "it" for the rum wash.
      > Do you mix the whole lot up or just siphon from the middle?(in order to keep out the lumpy bits. (making sure HWMBO is out of the area/ town ) can you imagine her reaction. "And you think I'm going to drink that you gotta be joking".
      > Lumpy hairy bits or not that is the question?
      > Geoff
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
      > >
      > > > Do not use alcotec yeast - either ale or baker's for ester formation.
      > > > Bacteria? Sorry you need to experiment locally.
      > > > wal
      > >
      > >
      > > The 'correct' yeasts and 'correct' bacteria for true traditional rums are derived from the sugar cane stalk itself. The grey powder you see on the mature stalk is wild yeasts that have adapted (mutated) to feeding off cane as a preference. The symbiotic bacteria can be cultivated from the crushed stalks (bagasse). I think I remember Arroyo writing about that but I could be wrong.
      > >
      > > Again you're SOL in a country that doesn't grow cane.
      > >
      > >
      > > Slainte!
      > > regards Harry
      > >
      >
    • waljaco
      Some rums are made using only natural fermentation...... .....Other rums are fermented using selected and cultured strains of yeast... wal
      Message 2 of 16 , Mar 25, 2009
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        "Some rums are made using only natural fermentation......
        .....Other rums are fermented using selected and cultured strains of yeast..."
        wal
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
        >
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
        >
        > > Do not use alcotec yeast - either ale or baker's for ester formation.
        > > Bacteria? Sorry you need to experiment locally.
        > > wal
        >
        >
        > The 'correct' yeasts and 'correct' bacteria for true traditional rums are derived from the sugar cane stalk itself. The grey powder you see on the mature stalk is wild yeasts that have adapted (mutated) to feeding off cane as a preference. The symbiotic bacteria can be cultivated from the crushed stalks (bagasse). I think I remember Arroyo writing about that but I could be wrong.
        >
        > Again you're SOL in a country that doesn't grow cane.
        >
        >
        > Slainte!
        > regards Harry
        >
      • Trid
        ... You know...that statement is just the icing on the cake when I first misread the subject line as lumpy black Harry bits. Trid -too early to be awake
        Message 3 of 16 , Mar 25, 2009
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          --- On Tue, 3/24/09, burrows206 <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Harry,
          > When you have a good fungal growth at the height of summer
          > in UK (such as it is). Is the local variant of fungal
          > infection (remember it's dunder we're talking about
          > guys not the local night life)

          You know...that statement is just the icing on the cake when I first misread the subject line as "lumpy black Harry bits."

          Trid
          -too early to be awake today
        • dearknarl
          Geoff, Most of the time with my infected dunder, the solid bits either float or sink, and draining from near the bottom of the bucket with a sediment reducing
          Message 4 of 16 , Mar 25, 2009
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            Geoff,

            Most of the time with my infected dunder, the solid bits either float
            or sink, and draining from near the bottom of the bucket with a
            sediment reducing tap and stopping before the floaties works fine.

            But one batch of infected dunder I got was VERY different. It had huge
            lumpy bits that neither floated or sunk, they just drifted around. I
            used a slotted spoon to get out the really big bits, so they would
            stop blocking the tap. That batch smelled a bit like soy sauce, which
            luckily didn't distill over. Still made ok rum :-P

            cheers,
            knarl.

            On 3/25/09, burrows206 <jeffrey.burrows@...> wrote:
            > Hi Harry,
            > When you have a good fungal growth at the height of summer in UK (such as
            > it is). Is the local variant of fungal infection (remember it's dunder
            > we're talking about guys not the local night life) distributed throughout
            > the entire batch of dunder,(top to bottom, front to back) in the same way
            > that ethanol is distributed throughout the entire wash.
            > Assuming this is so, the showy grotesque hairy growth on top of the
            > dunder is really the showroom for the fungi. This is where I think a lot of
            > people are having the problem in today's modern hygienic society.
            > Upon opening the lid they are confronted with something that looks like
            > "it" would just need the electric heart "jump leads" to bring "it" into
            > moving life again. The first impulse is get "it" down the drain and fast.
            > I can't smell a thing but I'm sure the smell might not be that pleasant
            > either. When you've got yourself past this initial reaction, and you've
            > talked yourself into using "it" for the rum wash.
            > Do you mix the whole lot up or just siphon from the middle?(in order to
            > keep out the lumpy bits. (making sure HWMBO is out of the area/ town ) can
            > you imagine her reaction. "And you think I'm going to drink that you gotta
            > be joking".
            > Lumpy hairy bits or not that is the question?
            > Geoff
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
            >>
            >> --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
            >>
            >> > Do not use alcotec yeast - either ale or baker's for ester formation.
            >> > Bacteria? Sorry you need to experiment locally.
            >> > wal
            >>
            >>
            >> The 'correct' yeasts and 'correct' bacteria for true traditional rums are
            >> derived from the sugar cane stalk itself. The grey powder you see on the
            >> mature stalk is wild yeasts that have adapted (mutated) to feeding off
            >> cane as a preference. The symbiotic bacteria can be cultivated from the
            >> crushed stalks (bagasse). I think I remember Arroyo writing about that
            >> but I could be wrong.
            >>
            >> Again you're SOL in a country that doesn't grow cane.
            >>
            >>
            >> Slainte!
            >> regards Harry
            >>
            >
            >
            >
          • someperson246@ymail.com
            Newbie here -- I m still in the process of gathering stuff to build my pot still, but reading the forum with interest. The notes about sugarcane supporting
            Message 5 of 16 , Mar 26, 2009
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              Newbie here -- I'm still in the process of gathering stuff to build my pot still, but reading the forum with interest.

              The notes about sugarcane supporting certain bacterial and yeast flora have got me a-thunkin...

              A local grocery store has 6 foot long stalks of sugar cane. No idea what's been done to them, they're just sitting out at the end of the aisle next to various yams and tubers and such.

              When I finally get around to fermenting, I wonder if hacking a few discs out of the sugarcane stalk might be a way to get things going with whatever things are growing on it.

              Thoughts? ('Course, the simple answer would be try it and find out, I suppose).
            • waljaco
              In Belize they slice the canes thinly vertically and add it to the mash to ferment. The wash and sliced cane is then put in a pot and distilled. Alcohol and
              Message 6 of 16 , Mar 26, 2009
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                In Belize they slice the canes thinly vertically and add it to the mash to ferment. The wash and sliced cane is then put in a pot and distilled. Alcohol and esters locked in the slices is extracted.
                wal
                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "someperson246@..." <someperson246@...> wrote:
                >
                > Newbie here -- I'm still in the process of gathering stuff to build my pot still, but reading the forum with interest.
                >
                > The notes about sugarcane supporting certain bacterial and yeast flora have got me a-thunkin...
                >
                > A local grocery store has 6 foot long stalks of sugar cane. No idea what's been done to them, they're just sitting out at the end of the aisle next to various yams and tubers and such.
                >
                > When I finally get around to fermenting, I wonder if hacking a few discs out of the sugarcane stalk might be a way to get things going with whatever things are growing on it.
                >
                > Thoughts? ('Course, the simple answer would be try it and find out, I suppose).
                >
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