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Re: RUM DO (2)

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  • waljaco
    For a lower pH for rum fermentations sulphuric acid was used (as for Canadian whisky). See Muspratt. The description of dunder you quote is actually from FB
    Message 1 of 6 , Mar 23, 2009
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      For a lower pH for rum fermentations sulphuric acid was used (as for Canadian whisky). See Muspratt.

      The description of dunder you quote is actually from FB Wright (1907), one of several I have seen. Some suggest (erroneously) it even replaces yeast.
      For the 1848 article see -
      http://tinyurl.com/5a6g9c

      Here are some excerpts from an experiment by S. Maza-Gomez et al at Louisiana State University. (Increased ester production in rum distillates using Propionibacterium thoenii and Clostridium propionicum stillage fermentations)
      'Esters add a fruity-like aroma to rum. Yeast plays a central role in the aroma formation during rum fermentation, which is affected by bacterial contamination.'
      'Microbiologically acidifying the stillage and converting some acids into esters, incorporated into the final fermented mash for distilling will improve rum aromas and shorten ageing.'
      wal
      (It has been found in Java that using ragi or jiuqu will add useful ester-producing bacteria)

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
      >
      > A pH of 3.8-5.5 is OK for beer!
      > wal
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mavnkaf" <mavnkaf@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > The dunder is mainly to acidify the molasses wash. Not used everywhere. Good ale yeasts create esters. Distill to 70%abv, stop at 40%abv (similar to cognac), collect in 500ml containers and mix to your taste. Add oak chips & caramel. You could do an open fermentation to invite wild yeasts and fungi? Start off with a lighter style - this is in vogue.
      > > > wal
      > >
      > >
      > > Hi Wal, with due respect, I disagree about the acid. I do believe Harry has already mentioned that Dunder has little acid there fore it is not the reason why a brewer would add dunder to a molasses wash. Just remember, Dunder is NOT Backset!
      > >
      > > I would almost call it, "An other chance to save water AND add flavor process". Back in the 1800's they were much better at recycling than we are now days.
      > >
      > > ----------------------------------------
      > >
      > > "Properly recovered, cleared dunder has little acid. That's not to say it has none (in fact it's about pH 5.5-6), just that it's not really effective in reducing pH to levels below about 5.5
      > > _________________
      > > Slainte!
      > > regards Harry"
      > >
      > > ------------------------------------------
      > >
      > > And to quote youself, (a very good fine if I must say so),
      > >
      > > "Wal has found the perfect definition of Dunder from a Jamaican
      > > Planter/distiller ca. 1848"
      > >
      > >
      > > "Dunder, to be good, should be light, clear, and slightly
      > > bitter ; it should be quite free from acidity, and is always
      > > best when fresh."
      > >
      > > "Quote.. 'The Practical Sugar Planter' by Leonard Wray, 1848.
      > > Chapter 10,
      > > On The Distillation of Rum,"
      > >
      > > To be honest Wal, I'd bet my money on your first advice some while ago about adding flavor to Rum.
      > >
      > > Cheers
      > > Marc
      > >
      >
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