Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Expand Messages
  • Robert Hubble
    An interesting day. I started the stripping run on 12 gallons of brown-sugar/cow molasses rum wash, with dunder. I knew I had about half a carboy (~2.5
    Message 1 of 5 , Mar 14, 2009
      An interesting day.  I started the stripping run on 12 gallons of brown-sugar/cow molasses rum wash, with dunder. I knew I had about half a carboy (~2.5 gallons) of similar low wines from a previous run, but I evidently didn't mark that carboy as rum.

      To verify that the unmarked carboy really was rum, I poured a small glass from the carboy and took it into the house, to taste at my leisure. While I hadn't measured it, this stuff must run ~70 proof, and it was *good*! Very smooth, and a big nice rum flavor - no weeny "white rum" stuff here. MY wife even loved it, and she's pretty cautious with straight boozes. I'd put these low wines up against any of the typical dark rums (considering the robust flavor), and I've still got a spirit run to do (after I finish today's beer-stripping, working as we speak). I'll bet I can age it to match Zaya rum.

      To the subject at hand, after one taste, I'm thinking *dark* rum, and I know that caramel coloring is normally used to darken rum. I'm a cook, but the caramels I've made in the past kinda spooked me, with really high temperatures, *nasty* burning splatters, and pans that are a bitch to clean, and I've never really done a dark caramel. No sweat, thought I, I'll go to my LHBS, get some caramel coloring, and I'll be home free. It turns out they don't sell the stuff. Still no sweat, and I went to Google, and my problem expanded.

      There's plain caramel color, caustic sulfite process (not sure how *that* works) caramel color, ammonia process caramel color, and sulfite ammonia process caramel color, classified I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Some of these are rated for compatability with various ethanol abv's, and not all are available in household quantities.

      Does anyone have any experience in this matter? I'm going to have some kickass rum, and I want it to look dark (and you'll notice I'm not mentioning the discussion where we were all told the reason a first-run rum must taste bad).

      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller



      Hotmail® is up to 70% faster. Now good news travels really fast. Find out more.
    • Link D'Antoni
      Z-Bob,   I ve had some charred oak that didn t impart much taste but was great for the coloring. It accomplish the desire result quit nicely.  One batch I
      Message 2 of 5 , Mar 14, 2009
        Z-Bob,

          I've had some charred oak that didn't impart much taste but was great for the coloring. It accomplish the desire result quit nicely.  One batch I added back store bought molasses to the end result before aging.  I think it was 1 tablespoon per gallon.  I LOVE dark rums.  The molasses didn't add as much color as the charred chips but did really inhance the flavor. 

         On another note.  I'm finally moving to a new (and improved) location which will keep me out of SWMBO's kitchen. I'll be able to get all my stuff out of storage.  I have 15 gallons of that 84.1 Brix molasses.  I've loosely figured that it will produce about 15 gallons or so of 84ish proof rum.  It'll be a month before I'll be set up.  Yes, I'll do it in batches. 

        Link

        --- On Sat, 3/14/09, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
        From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
        Subject: [Distillers]
        To: distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Date: Saturday, March 14, 2009, 4:54 PM

        An interesting day.  I started the stripping run on 12 gallons of brown-sugar/ cow molasses rum wash, with dunder. I knew I had about half a carboy (~2.5 gallons) of similar low wines from a previous run, but I evidently didn't mark that carboy as rum.

        To verify that the unmarked carboy really was rum, I poured a small glass from the carboy and took it into the house, to taste at my leisure. While I hadn't measured it, this stuff must run ~70 proof, and it was *good*! Very smooth, and a big nice rum flavor - no weeny "white rum" stuff here. MY wife even loved it, and she's pretty cautious with straight boozes. I'd put these low wines up against any of the typical dark rums (considering the robust flavor), and I've still got a spirit run to do (after I finish today's beer-stripping, working as we speak). I'll bet I can age it to match Zaya rum.

        To the subject at hand, after one taste, I'm thinking *dark* rum, and I know that caramel coloring is normally used to darken rum. I'm a cook, but the caramels I've made in the past kinda spooked me, with really high temperatures, *nasty* burning splatters, and pans that are a bitch to clean, and I've never really done a dark caramel. No sweat, thought I, I'll go to my LHBS, get some caramel coloring, and I'll be home free. It turns out they don't sell the stuff. Still no sweat, and I went to Google, and my problem expanded.

        There's plain caramel color, caustic sulfite process (not sure how *that* works) caramel color, ammonia process caramel color, and sulfite ammonia process caramel color, classified I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Some of these are rated for compatability with various ethanol abv's, and not all are available in household quantities.

        Does anyone have any experience in this matter? I'm going to have some kickass rum, and I want it to look dark (and you'll notice I'm not mentioning the discussion where we were all told the reason a first-run rum must taste bad).

        Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller



        Hotmail® is up to 70% faster. Now good news travels really fast. Find out more.


      • Robert Hubble
        Hey, Link! And thanks for the response. I was planning on some oaking for part of the rum, along with oxygenating/evaporating, to try to duplicate some rum
        Message 3 of 5 , Mar 14, 2009
          Hey, Link!

          And thanks for the response.  I was planning on some oaking for part of the rum, along with oxygenating/evaporating, to try to duplicate some rum that my high-roller son introduced me to. Have you ever tried Zaya rum? A nicely aged liquor that happens to be rum, but I think mine will start with a better base flavor.

          I'd also like to try adding molasses, maybe in addition to spicing, which I also like. I just thought I'd try the traditional way, but I'm sure not locked in to it.

          I can't remember what the Brix rating was on my molasses, but I seem to recall it was close to 90. After using that to formulate my wash (a few years ago) I found out a lot that was non-fermentables.

          I'm really lucky; my wife is *very* supportive of my booze hobbies, even the legal ones. It gives us a chance to do lots of things together, like raising grapes and brewing beer.

          Retirement isn't what I planned for, but it's a pretty good fit.

          Good to hear from you.

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




          To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          From: link2d@...
          Date: Sat, 14 Mar 2009 15:18:19 -0700
          Subject: Re: [Distillers]

          Z-Bob,

            I've had some charred oak that didn't impart much taste but was great for the coloring. It accomplish the desire result quit nicely.  One batch I added back store bought molasses to the end result before aging.  I think it was 1 tablespoon per gallon.  I LOVE dark rums.  The molasses didn't add as much color as the charred chips but did really inhance the flavor. 

           On another note.  I'm finally moving to a new (and improved) location which will keep me out of SWMBO's kitchen. I'll be able to get all my stuff out of storage.  I have 15 gallons of that 84.1 Brix molasses.  I've loosely figured that it will produce about 15 gallons or so of 84ish proof rum.  It'll be a month before I'll be set up.  Yes, I'll do it in batches. 

          Link

          --- On Sat, 3/14/09, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@hotmail. com> wrote:
          From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@hotmail. com>
          Subject: [Distillers]
          To: distillers@yahoogro ups.com
          Date: Saturday, March 14, 2009, 4:54 PM

          An interesting day.  I started the stripping run on 12 gallons of brown-sugar/ cow molasses rum wash, with dunder. I knew I had about half a carboy (~2.5 gallons) of similar low wines from a previous run, but I evidently didn't mark that carboy as rum.

          To verify that the unmarked carboy really was rum, I poured a small glass from the carboy and took it into the house, to taste at my leisure. While I hadn't measured it, this stuff must run ~70 proof, and it was *good*! Very smooth, and a big nice rum flavor - no weeny "white rum" stuff here. MY wife even loved it, and she's pretty cautious with straight boozes. I'd put these low wines up against any of the typical dark rums (considering the robust flavor), and I've still got a spirit run to do (after I finish today's beer-stripping, working as we speak). I'll bet I can age it to match Zaya rum.

          To the subject at hand, after one taste, I'm thinking *dark* rum, and I know that caramel coloring is normally used to darken rum. I'm a cook, but the caramels I've made in the past kinda spooked me, with really high temperatures, *nasty* burning splatters, and pans that are a bitch to clean, and I've never really done a dark caramel. No sweat, thought I, I'll go to my LHBS, get some caramel coloring, and I'll be home free. It turns out they don't sell the stuff. Still no sweat, and I went to Google, and my problem expanded.

          There's plain caramel color, caustic sulfite process (not sure how *that* works) caramel color, ammonia process caramel color, and sulfite ammonia process caramel color, classified I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Some of these are rated for compatability with various ethanol abv's, and not all are available in household quantities.

          Does anyone have any experience in this matter? I'm going to have some kickass rum, and I want it to look dark (and you'll notice I'm not mentioning the discussion where we were all told the reason a first-run rum must taste bad).

          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




          Hotmail® is up to 70% faster. Now good news travels really fast. Find out more.



          Windows Live™ Contacts: Organize your contact list. Check it out.
        • Link D'Antoni
          Z-Bob,  No, I haven t tried Zaya rum.  I don t believe that I ve ever seen it.  I ll put in on my list.  The best my Google search showed is that it s
          Message 4 of 5 , Mar 16, 2009
            Z-Bob,

             No, I haven't tried Zaya rum.  I don't believe that I've ever seen it.  I'll put in on my list.  The best my Google search showed is that it's product of China?  A friend brought me a bottle of Sake' from China last month.  It tasted like... regurgitation (noun: an act of regurgitating: as the casting up of incompletely digested food).
             
              Yeah, my experience is that molasses washes ferment out about half.  I usually cut the molasses back to a 14% potential alcohol.  It usually ferments down to 7ish%. 
            Once I added sugar to increase another 7% to the wash for a lighter rum. This should have given a 14% wash, right.  That batch continued to fermented up to 17.5%.  Yes, I tried it again but only got the total 14%.  As mentioned earlier, I prefer darker rums anyway. 
             
             SWMBO won't follow full time for a few months after 'the move'.  That should give me time to get my washes and stripping runs done before the honey-dos set in. <sigh>

            Link

            --- On Sat, 3/14/09, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
            From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...>
            Subject: RE: [Distillers]
            To: distillers@yahoogroups.com
            Date: Saturday, March 14, 2009, 8:46 PM

            Hey, Link!

            And thanks for the response.  I was planning on some oaking for part of the rum, along with oxygenating/ evaporating, to try to duplicate some rum that my high-roller son introduced me to. Have you ever tried Zaya rum? A nicely aged liquor that happens to be rum, but I think mine will start with a better base flavor.

            I'd also like to try adding molasses, maybe in addition to spicing, which I also like. I just thought I'd try the traditional way, but I'm sure not locked in to it.

            I can't remember what the Brix rating was on my molasses, but I seem to recall it was close to 90. After using that to formulate my wash (a few years ago) I found out a lot that was non-fermentables.

            I'm really lucky; my wife is *very* supportive of my booze hobbies, even the legal ones. It gives us a chance to do lots of things together, like raising grapes and brewing beer.

            Retirement isn't what I planned for, but it's a pretty good fit.

            Good to hear from you.

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




            To: Distillers@yahoogro ups.com
            From: link2d@yahoo. com
            Date: Sat, 14 Mar 2009 15:18:19 -0700
            Subject: Re: [Distillers]

            Z-Bob,

              I've had some charred oak that didn't impart much taste but was great for the coloring. It accomplish the desire result quit nicely.  One batch I added back store bought molasses to the end result before aging.  I think it was 1 tablespoon per gallon.  I LOVE dark rums.  The molasses didn't add as much color as the charred chips but did really inhance the flavor. 

             On another note.  I'm finally moving to a new (and improved) location which will keep me out of SWMBO's kitchen. I'll be able to get all my stuff out of storage.  I have 15 gallons of that 84.1 Brix molasses.  I've loosely figured that it will produce about 15 gallons or so of 84ish proof rum.  It'll be a month before I'll be set up.  Yes, I'll do it in batches. 

            Link

            --- On Sat, 3/14/09, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@hotmail. com> wrote:
            From: Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@hotmail. com>
            Subject: [Distillers]
            To: distillers@yahoogro ups.com
            Date: Saturday, March 14, 2009, 4:54 PM

            An interesting day.  I started the stripping run on 12 gallons of brown-sugar/ cow molasses rum wash, with dunder. I knew I had about half a carboy (~2.5 gallons) of similar low wines from a previous run, but I evidently didn't mark that carboy as rum.

            To verify that the unmarked carboy really was rum, I poured a small glass from the carboy and took it into the house, to taste at my leisure. While I hadn't measured it, this stuff must run ~70 proof, and it was *good*! Very smooth, and a big nice rum flavor - no weeny "white rum" stuff here. MY wife even loved it, and she's pretty cautious with straight boozes. I'd put these low wines up against any of the typical dark rums (considering the robust flavor), and I've still got a spirit run to do (after I finish today's beer-stripping, working as we speak). I'll bet I can age it to match Zaya rum.

            To the subject at hand, after one taste, I'm thinking *dark* rum, and I know that caramel coloring is normally used to darken rum. I'm a cook, but the caramels I've made in the past kinda spooked me, with really high temperatures, *nasty* burning splatters, and pans that are a bitch to clean, and I've never really done a dark caramel. No sweat, thought I, I'll go to my LHBS, get some caramel coloring, and I'll be home free. It turns out they don't sell the stuff. Still no sweat, and I went to Google, and my problem expanded.

            There's plain caramel color, caustic sulfite process (not sure how *that* works) caramel color, ammonia process caramel color, and sulfite ammonia process caramel color, classified I, II, III, and IV, respectively. Some of these are rated for compatability with various ethanol abv's, and not all are available in household quantities.

            Does anyone have any experience in this matter? I'm going to have some kickass rum, and I want it to look dark (and you'll notice I'm not mentioning the discussion where we were all told the reason a first-run rum must taste bad).

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




            Hotmail® is up to 70% faster. Now good news travels really fast. Find out more.



            Windows Live™ Contacts: Organize your contact list. Check it out.

          • Robert Hubble
            Hi Link, The Zaya I m talking about is Gran Reserva Zaya - 12 year old from Trinidad, and is *very* light in that puke note you mention (lol). It s probably
            Message 5 of 5 , Mar 16, 2009
              Hi Link,

              The Zaya I'm talking about is "Gran Reserva Zaya - 12 year old"  from Trinidad, and is *very* light in that puke note you mention (lol). It's probably the best simple *aged* rum I've tasted, and sips like a great Scotch whisky, but not as complex.

              The rum recipe I've had such good luck with is 10 pounds of brown sugar (C&H) and 4 cups of cow molasses with 5.5 gallons of water. A bit of yeast nutrient (it's pretty slow otherwise) and EC1118, and that's it.  Anymore, I don't even try to use a hydrometer with rum washes.

              A very nice robust rum flavor. I can't wait to try all the variants (spiced, caramel-colored, simple aged, maybe cut with neutral to make a white mixing rum).

              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




              To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
              From: link2d@...
              Date: Mon, 16 Mar 2009 11:36:30 -0700
              Subject: RE: [Distillers]

              Z-Bob,

               No, I haven't tried Zaya rum.  I don't believe that I've ever seen it.  I'll put in on my list.  The best my Google search showed is that it's product of China?  A friend brought me a bottle of Sake' from China last month.  It tasted like... regurgitation (noun: an act of regurgitating: as the casting up of incompletely digested food).
               
                Yeah, my experience is that molasses washes ferment out about half.  I usually cut the molasses back to a 14% potential alcohol.  It usually ferments down to 7ish%. 
              Once I added sugar to increase another 7% to the wash for a lighter rum. This should have given a 14% wash, right.  That batch continued to fermented up to 17.5%.  Yes, I tried it again but only got the total 14%.  As mentioned earlier, I prefer darker rums anyway. 
               
               SWMBO won't follow full time for a few months after 'the move'.  That should give me time to get my washes and stripping runs done before the honey-dos set in. <sigh>

              Link

              --- On Sat, 3/14/09, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@hotmail. com> wrote:
              ----snip----



              Hotmail® is up to 70% faster. Now good news travels really fast. Find out more.
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.