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Re: A Rum Do

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  • anthonyathawes
    I got half a dozen right away this morning. Cost 32P per 500 cc per one. They even import spheres for £250 from India. I don t see much would happen if they
    Message 1 of 26 , Mar 6, 2009
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      I got half a dozen right away this morning. Cost 32P per 500 cc per one. They even import spheres for £250 from India. I don't see much would happen if they touched the element though - perhaps a precaution. Tony

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@...> wrote:
      >
      > Goodness only knows where I should get granite round here! I don't like the idea of house bricks as they look absorbent.
      >
      > I feel inclined to take up the suggestion to put in a couple of gallons of Dunder first. This should take the level above the element as well as, hopefully, putting in a lot of flavour which it's lacking at the moment. Failing this,any discrepancy could be made up with ordinary water.
      >
      > As a last ditch stand, I drown rum in Coca Cola, and the spirit pleasantly dilutes it. At least it is smoother after a couple of weeks waiting.
      >
      > As a matter of interest, I think it might be worth putting in a small electric motor and propeller to stir the mix around.
      >
      > Tony
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Eric Yendall <eric_yendall@> wrote:
      > >
      > >
      > > Put a few clean granite or similar rocks on the bottom. Works like a charm for me. Just don't let them touch the element.
      > >
      > > Eric
      > >
      >
    • anthonyathawes
      Having got thus far, I want to know why! Tony
      Message 2 of 26 , Mar 6, 2009
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        Having got thus far, I want to know why! Tony

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
        >
        > Too much analysis on your part is leading to paralysis!
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@> wrote:
        > >
        > > I'm sorry - but could you clear up what this means?
        > >
        > > Should I put the Dunder out in the garden with a cloth over it,and, if so, for how long? Would the British atmosphere work? Or, as in my earlier case, does the Dunder already have the active ingredient in it and go to work immediately?
        > >
        > > Or, what do you put in to simulate the same effect? What do the big boys do?
        > >
        > > Tony
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > "Hoever it is the high level of bacterial contamination in these (spontaneous) fermentations that produces many of the desirable congeners such as acids and esters."
        > > > "Dunder is old stillage that has been stored in open tanks to allow development of a strong bacterial flora.
        > > > To attempt a more controlled fermentation in production of heavy rums, a pure culture of yeast may be used together with a pure bacterial culture.
        > > > A pure culture of bacteria such as Clostridium saccharobutyricum may be added after 6-12 hrs of the yeast fermentation."
        > > > (Feedstocks, fermentation and distillation for production of heavy and light rums, JE Murtagh)
        > > > The more you read the more you know - so read, read, read.
        > > > wal
        > > >
        > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@> wrote:
        > > > >
        > > > > Well, this has been a most interesting chase! A year ago, I produced a half full winchester that had the the most ugly mould on the surface. It was so awful I ditched it. Shortly afterwards I was told I'd got rid of the best bit. Too late! Goodness knows what an open tankful in Jamaica would look like! Tony
        > > > >
        > > > >
        > > > > -- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
        > > > > >
        > > > > > In Jamaica dunder is stored in open tanks. Rum distillers sometimes also add a suitable mould to the fermsnt to create esters.
        > > > > > wal
        > > > > >
        > > > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@> wrote:
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > I have 2 one gallon winchesters of Dunder full to the bungs. Will this generate fungi, or should there be an air gap of say 2"? Tony
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > > > - In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > You are concerned about flavour. The raw materials provide only some of the flavour. Yeasts and fungi produce wonderful esters then the added caramel syrup and toasted oak (chips). The esters in dunder should be produced by fungi before use.
        > > > > > > > wal
        > > > > > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@> wrote:
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > Goodness only knows where I should get granite round here! I don't like the idea of house bricks as they look absorbent.
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > I feel inclined to take up the suggestion to put in a couple of gallons of Dunder first. This should take the level above the element as well as, hopefully, putting in a lot of flavour which it's lacking at the moment. Failing this,any discrepancy could be made up with ordinary water.
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > As a last ditch stand, I drown rum in Coca Cola, and the spirit pleasantly dilutes it. At least it is smoother after a couple of weeks waiting.
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > As a matter of interest, I think it might be worth putting in a small electric motor and propeller to stir the mix around.
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > Tony
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Eric Yendall <eric_yendall@> wrote:
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > Put a few clean granite or similar rocks on the bottom. Works like a charm for me. Just don't let them touch the element.
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > > > Eric
        > > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > > >
        > > > > > > >
        > > > > > >
        > > > > >
        > > > >
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • waljaco
        It s all been done for you - just look it up. wal
        Message 3 of 26 , Mar 6, 2009
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          It's all been done for you - just look it up.

          wal
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@...> wrote:
          >
          > Having got thus far, I want to know why! Tony
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
          > >
          > > Too much analysis on your part is leading to paralysis!
          > > wal
          > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@> wrote:
          > > >
          > > > I'm sorry - but could you clear up what this means?
          > > >
          > > > Should I put the Dunder out in the garden with a cloth over it,and, if so, for how long? Would the British atmosphere work? Or, as in my earlier case, does the Dunder already have the active ingredient in it and go to work immediately?
          > > >
          > > > Or, what do you put in to simulate the same effect? What do the big boys do?
          > > >
          > > > Tony
          > > >
          > > >
          > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
          > > > >
          > > > > "Hoever it is the high level of bacterial contamination in these (spontaneous) fermentations that produces many of the desirable congeners such as acids and esters."
          > > > > "Dunder is old stillage that has been stored in open tanks to allow development of a strong bacterial flora.
          > > > > To attempt a more controlled fermentation in production of heavy rums, a pure culture of yeast may be used together with a pure bacterial culture.
          > > > > A pure culture of bacteria such as Clostridium saccharobutyricum may be added after 6-12 hrs of the yeast fermentation."
          > > > > (Feedstocks, fermentation and distillation for production of heavy and light rums, JE Murtagh)
          > > > > The more you read the more you know - so read, read, read.
          > > > > wal
          > > > >
          > > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@> wrote:
          > > > > >
          > > > > > Well, this has been a most interesting chase! A year ago, I produced a half full winchester that had the the most ugly mould on the surface. It was so awful I ditched it. Shortly afterwards I was told I'd got rid of the best bit. Too late! Goodness knows what an open tankful in Jamaica would look like! Tony
          > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > > > -- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > In Jamaica dunder is stored in open tanks. Rum distillers sometimes also add a suitable mould to the fermsnt to create esters.
          > > > > > > wal
          > > > > > >
          > > > > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@> wrote:
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > I have 2 one gallon winchesters of Dunder full to the bungs. Will this generate fungi, or should there be an air gap of say 2"? Tony
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > - In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > You are concerned about flavour. The raw materials provide only some of the flavour. Yeasts and fungi produce wonderful esters then the added caramel syrup and toasted oak (chips). The esters in dunder should be produced by fungi before use.
          > > > > > > > > wal
          > > > > > > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "anthonyathawes" <anthony.athawes@> wrote:
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > Goodness only knows where I should get granite round here! I don't like the idea of house bricks as they look absorbent.
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > I feel inclined to take up the suggestion to put in a couple of gallons of Dunder first. This should take the level above the element as well as, hopefully, putting in a lot of flavour which it's lacking at the moment. Failing this,any discrepancy could be made up with ordinary water.
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > As a last ditch stand, I drown rum in Coca Cola, and the spirit pleasantly dilutes it. At least it is smoother after a couple of weeks waiting.
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > As a matter of interest, I think it might be worth putting in a small electric motor and propeller to stir the mix around.
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > Tony
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Eric Yendall <eric_yendall@> wrote:
          > > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > > Put a few clean granite or similar rocks on the bottom. Works like a charm for me. Just don't let them touch the element.
          > > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > > > Eric
          > > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > > >
          > > > > > > >
          > > > > > >
          > > > > >
          > > > >
          > > >
          > >
          >
        • Anthony Athawes
          I got some 6 small blocks yesterday - 32 pence per half litre. Seemed a lot for a piece of the Earth! ... From: martin martins To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Message 4 of 26 , Mar 6, 2009
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            I got some 6 small blocks yesterday - 32 pence per half litre. Seemed a lot for a piece of the Earth!
            ----- Original Message -----
            Sent: Thursday, March 05, 2009 5:26 PM
            Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: A Rum Do

            >Goodness only knows where I should get granite round here! I don't like the idea of house bricks as they look absorbent

            Garden centres, Wilco, fish supply stores. Don't use bricks, they are made of clay and goodness knows what :)

            >As a last ditch stand, I drown rum in Coca Cola, and the spirit pleasantly dilutes it. At least it is smoother after a couple of weeks waiting.

            It'll improve the coke anyway, seems a shocking waste of rum though.


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