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Re: Sour mash - non corn recipe?

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  • abbababbaccc
    Jim, Based on Ian s writing it seems that the most affecting factors are the low pH and yeast activity. As I understood it this converts about one third of the
    Message 1 of 40 , Jan 28, 2009
      Jim,

      Based on Ian's writing it seems that the most affecting factors are
      the low pH and yeast activity. As I understood it this converts about
      one third of the starches in one fermentation, which I believe forms
      basis for his recommendation of three cycles. Since most recipes I've
      seen have no amylase content and since amylases do not work well in
      room temperature their effect should be negligible. Actually it might
      be beneficial for the flavor to not have amylases present as that
      could slow down the starch conversion and get your grains to last
      more cycles.

      Anyway, as I see it the sour mash method is easy to implement when
      compared to lautering several individual grains mashes. It also gives
      you lot's of booze for little grains and the continuous nature
      ensures that you'll get your boiler full of low wines. In principle I
      like the idea, we'll see how it turns out. Too bad I haven't found
      any corn for good price, I'd really like to try the traditional
      version of this. And no, I'm not a purist in this case. If I were I'd
      stick to my single malt. I've even added dextrose in a case or two in
      the when the SG was too low.

      Cheers, Riku


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "jamesonbeam1" <jamesonbeam1@...>
      wrote:
      >
      >
      > Hey Riku,
      >
      > Been following this thread with great interest, however maybe its me
      > thats been living in the South here too long. Its is not only
      > starting to affect my speech and spelling (thanks Goose, Nameless
      and
      > all lol), but maybe my thinkin' as well...
      >
      > When people start speaking about different grains, microbes
      specific to
      > certain grains and how corn has to be used to have a proper "sour
      mash",
      > it just dont seem to make a hog's head difference or sense to me.
      >
      > Whether ya use Rye, Oats, Barley, Corn, Millet or whatever, the
      concept
      > of "Sour Mashing" as invented by ol' Dr. Crow (or his side kick Dr.
      > Amburgey depending on which Historian you believe), was invented
      and
      > used for several reasons.
      >
      > First, by using some of the left over trub and then adding old
      backset
      > to it, just like making sourdough bread, this would help with the
      > consistency in taste from batch to batch and also save costs (the
      ol'
      > timers being very frugal).
      >
      > Second, this helps increase the flavors of the new batch from the
      old
      > backset when added to the new batch. Thirdly, the early Kentucky
      and
      > Tennessee distillers used the local stream waters which where
      heavily
      > conditioned by the huge limestone rock deposits under the streams in
      > these states.. In order to reduce the pH levels of these soft
      waters,
      > they added the acidic backset from prior distillations since they
      didnt
      > have Acid Blend, citric acid or lemons readily available at that
      time...
      >
      > Its my opinion that if you stick to one or two types of grain and
      stay
      > with em using the sour mash method, then it should work out fine
      without
      > any dang corn.
      >
      > Frankly i like the idea of rolled rye and barley with some malted
      barley
      > for malt flavor or if your going to be a purist and mash it all
      grain
      > without sugar. But again to me sour mashing is just a method of
      saving
      > costs, maintaining consistancy and increasing flavors - sort a
      similar
      > to making rum with dunder.
      >
      > Maybe I aint thinking as deep as the rest of you all, but to be
      safe,
      > as Ken Mc. says:
      >
      > This is my opinion and if Im wrong I am sure I will be corrected
      [;)] .
      >
      > Vino es Veritas,
      >
      > Jim aka Waldo.
      >
      >
    • abbababbaccc
      The foaming was indeed not an issue and I did the strip run at 3kW. I ll comment on the quality once I have done the second run for collected low wines.
      Message 40 of 40 , Feb 3, 2009
        The foaming was indeed not an issue and I did the strip run at 3kW.
        I'll comment on the quality once I have done the second run for
        collected low wines.

        Speaking of wheat flour mashes, found 2 gallon jars full of that
        stuff with oakchips. I think it's time to dilute some and start
        sampling :)

        Cheers, Riku

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...>
        wrote:
        >
        > I'll have to see how much mash and backset I end up with. About one
        > third sounds good to me. Cornfeed had to be ordered (which I did as
        I
        > do like bourbon) so I ended up raiding the supermarket for some
        > grains. The mashbill became:
        >
        > 3kg precooked barley
        > 0.6 kg rolled rye
        > 3.6 kg sugar
        > Filled it up to 30 liters and pitched two packages of bakers yeast.
        > This is mimicking the UJSM recipe with a scotch tune.
        >
        > I found an electric blanket that's wrapped around the mash tun so
        > temperature shouldn't be an issue anymore. We'll see how it turns
        > out. I expect little to no foaming during distilation as all the
        > grains are gelatinized. When I did wheat flour mash with cooking
        > method the foaming was nonexistant - I was able to strip at 3kW. I
        > hope this to be the same.
        >
        > Slainte, Riku
        >
        >
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