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Commercial Gin Recipes

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  • Jim Creighton
    A while back, posted some commercial gin recipes. I took the liberty to convert them to grams measurement, using his formulas, in a spreadsheet, for
    Message 1 of 16 , Jan 27, 2009
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        A while back, <waljaco> posted some commercial gin recipes.
      I took the liberty to convert them to grams measurement, using his formulas, in a spreadsheet, for easy reading.
       
      I have uploaded the result in pdf format to the Files section.
       
      Cheers, Jim
    • peter442737
      Hi Jim Just been reading your file on the Commercial Gin Recipes. Can you explain further on how to use them. The ammount of ingredients to what quantity of
      Message 2 of 16 , Apr 25, 2009
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        Hi Jim
        Just been reading your file on the Commercial Gin Recipes. Can you explain further on how to use them. The ammount of ingredients to what quantity of product. Any further info will be very much appreciated.
        Regards
        Peter--- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Creighton" <jcreighton@...> wrote:
        >
        > A while back, <waljaco> posted some commercial gin recipes.
        > I took the liberty to convert them to grams measurement, using his formulas, in a spreadsheet, for easy reading.
        >
        > I have uploaded the result in pdf format to the Files section.
        >
        > Cheers, Jim
        >
      • waljaco
        If you mean gin recipes from contemporary commercial distilleries - I have not come across any. I did find published mid 19th century English recipes. These
        Message 3 of 16 , Apr 25, 2009
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          If you mean gin recipes from contemporary commercial distilleries - I have not come across any. I did find published mid 19th century English recipes. These might need to be modified to suit current taste and use.
          wal
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "peter442737" <peter.coleman20@...> wrote:
          >
          > Hi Jim
          > Just been reading your file on the Commercial Gin Recipes. Can you explain further on how to use them. The ammount of ingredients to what quantity of product. Any further info will be very much appreciated.
          > Regards
          > Peter--- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Jim Creighton" <jcreighton@> wrote:
          > >
          > > A while back, <waljaco> posted some commercial gin recipes.
          > > I took the liberty to convert them to grams measurement, using his formulas, in a spreadsheet, for easy reading.
          > >
          > > I have uploaded the result in pdf format to the Files section.
          > >
          > > Cheers, Jim
          > >
          >
        • Robert Hubble
          Peter, Here s an old post from Wal, with the 2 recipes I make appended to the file. Recipe number 1, with no angelica root, seems to be the 80% favorite. You
          Message 4 of 16 , Apr 25, 2009
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            Peter,

            Here's an old post from Wal, with the 2 recipes I make appended to the file. Recipe number 1, with no angelica root, seems to be the 80% favorite. You my also need to know that one grain = 1/7000 pounds. Sorry about the units, but they match my measuring gear.

            *****RECIPE FOLLOWS******
            WITH BOB'S GIN EXTRACT RECIPEs

            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:

            I have also found the botanicals used for the French Citadelle Gin.
            This 1771 recipe from Dunkirk has 19 botanicals which is the biggest
            number among current gins.

            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:

            >> Just found the botanicals for a Dutch gin - Van Gogh Gin.
            >> --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@h...> wrote:
            >
            >>> > Msg 13359 has commercial gin recipes mainly from the 19th

            century.

            >>> > This gives an idea of the botanicals and their quantity used.
            >>> > With the aim of formulating a standard model for gin botanical

            quantities for the homedistiller, here is a table of the botanicals
            used in 10 modern gins:

            >>> > 1)Tiger Gin
            >>> > 2)Gordon's Distilled London Dry Gin
            >>> > 3)Beefeater London Distilled Dry Gin
            >>> > 4)Plymouth Gin
            >>> > 5)Bombay Distilled London Dry Gin
            >>> > 6)Bombay Sapphire Distilled London Dry Gin
            >>> > 7)Mercury Gin
            >>> > 8)Juniper Green London Dry Gin
            >>> > 9)Van Gogh Gin (Holland)
            >>> >10)Citadelle Gin (France)
            >
            >>
            >> 
            >
            >>> > Botanicals used-------Gin Brand (see above)
            >>> > ---------------------1---2---3---4---5---6---7---8---9---10---
            >>> > Juniper-------------yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-
            >>> > Coriander-----------yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-
            >>> > Angelica root-------yes-----yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-
            >>> > Cassia--------------yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
            >>> > Cinnamon------------yes---------------------------------yes-
            >>> > Liquorice-----------yes-----yes-----yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
            >>> > Bitter almonds----------------------yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
            >>> > Grains of Paradise----------------------yes---------yes-yes-
            >>> > Cubeb berries---------------------------yes---------yes-yes-
            >>> > Bitter orange peel----------yes-----------------------------
            >>> > Sweet orange peel---yes---------yes---------yes---------yes-
            >>> > Lemon peel----------yes-----yes-yes-yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
            >>> > Ginger------------------yes---------------------------------
            >>> > Orris root----------yes---------yes-yes-yes-yes-----yes-yes-
            >>> > Cardamon------------yes---------yes---------------------yes-
            >>> > Nutmeg--------------yes-yes-----------------------------yes-
            >>> > Savory------------------------------------------yes-----yes-
            >>> > Calamus (sweet flag)----------------------------------------
            >>> > Chamomile---------------------------------------------------
            >>> > Violet root---------------------------------------------yes-
            >>> > Cumin---------------------------------------------------yes-
            >>> > Aniseed-------------------------------------------------yes-
            >>> > Fennel seed---------------------------------------------yes-


            >>> > The total amount of botanicals used is about 20-35 grams/litre.
            >>> > If we take the dominant botanical juniper as 'x', the proportions

             of the botanicals used is:

            >>> > x = juniper
            >>> > x/2 = coriander
            >>> > x/10 = angelica, cassia, cinnamon, liquorice, bitter almonds,
                         grains  of paradise, cubeb berries
            >
            >>> > x/100 = bitter & sweet orange peel, lemon peel, ginger, orris
                          root, cardamon, nutmeg, savory, calamus, chamomile,
                          fennel, aniseed, cumin, violet root.

            >>> > If we use x = 20g then x/2 = 10g, x/10 = 2g, x/100 = 0.2g (200mg)
            >>> > Some current gins do not have a pronounced juniper character as

            they are used for cocktails and are more of a flavored vodka - for
            this type of gin for 'x' use equal quantities for juniper &
            coriander  (i.e. x = 20g composed of 10g of juniper & 10g of
            coriander)

            >>> >
            >>> > The botanical are macerated in 45%abv neutral alcohol (usually

            for 24 hours), redistilled and then diluted to 42%abv which is an
            optimal strength for holding the flavour of the botanicals. Only the
            middle run (80-85%abv) is used to produce a high quality gin.
            Plymouth Gin also comes in a 57%abv 'Navy Strength' and which is also
            the British 100 proof strength.

            >>> > Bombay Sapphire Gin uses a Carterhead Still which contains a 

            botanicals basket through which the vapour passes, a technique which
            gives a lighter flavour.

            >>> > All gins include juniper and coriander as an ingredient along 

            with other botanicals. Typically a fine gin contains 6-10 botanicals,
            although the Dutch Damask Gin has 17, and the French Citadelle Gin
            has 19 - but this could be more for marketing reasons and has been
            criticised  for lacking direction.

            >>> > Some American gins mention chamomile as a botanical which would

            give a blue tinge to the gin.


            >>> > Botanical names:
            >>> > juniper - juniperis communis
            >>> > coriander - coriandrum sativum
            >>> > angelica - archangelica officinalis
            >>> > cassia - cinnamonum cassia
            >>> > cinnamon - cinnamonum zeylanicum
            >>> > liquorice - glycyrriza glabra
            >>> > bitter almond - prunus dulcis, amara
            >>> > grains of paradise - afromumum melegueta
            >>> > cubeb berries - piper cubeb
            >>> > bitter orange - citrus aurantium
            >>> > sweet orange - citrus sinensis
            >>> > lemon - citrus limon
            >>> > ginger - zinziber officinalis
            >>> > orris root - iris florentina
            >>> > cardamon - elletaria cardamomum
            >>> > nutmeg - myristica fragrans
            >>> > savory - satureja hortensis
            >>> > calamus - acorus calamus
            >>> > chamomile - matricaria chamomilla
            >>> > violet root - viola odorata
            >>> > cumin - cuminum cyminum
            >>> > aniseed - pimpinella anisum
            >>> > fennel - foeniculum vulgare
            >>> >
            >>> > The usual mash for English gin is 75% maize, 15% barley malt and

             10% other grains, although rectified spirit from molasses is also
            used.

            >>> > Dutch gin originally was made from 1/3 malted barley and 2/3 rye

            meal, although these days the proportions given is 1/3 malted barley,
            1/3 rye, 1/3 maize.

            >>> >
            >>> > Wal
            >>> > (Keep in mind the suggested formula has been based on published
            >>> > material and not on experience.)


            BOB'S GIN EXTRACT#1

            In quart jar, put:

            Juniper, 1 level cup, 80 grams
            Coriander, heaping half cup, 44 grams
            Cinnamon, 4 grams (62 grains)
            Pepper cracked, .3 grams (5 grains)
            Lemon peel, .8 grams (12 grains) ~1 1/4" strip
            Cardamom pods, .8 grams (5 pods)

            Cover with 40% abv "vodka".

            Let stand 10 days.  Distill in wee stovetop still until most of the flavor stops coming

            across (cinnamon flavor will be last).

            Use one part distillate to 8 parts neutral EtOH, or vodka.

            Plymouth version #2

            Juniper, 1 level cup, 80 grams
            Coriander, heaping half cup, 44 grams
            Angelica, 62 grains
            Orris root, 5 grains
            Pepper cracked, .3 grams (5 grains)
            Lemon peel, .8 grams (12 grains) ~1 1/4" strip
            Sweet orange peel, .8 grams (12 grains) ~1 1/4" strip
            Cardamom pods, .8 grams (5 pods)

            Use one part distillate to 10 parts neutral EtOH, or vodka.

            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




            To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
            From: peter.coleman20@...
            Date: Sat, 25 Apr 2009 19:47:29 +0000
            Subject: [Distillers] Re: Commercial Gin Recipes



            Hi Jim
            Just been reading your file on the Commercial Gin Recipes. Can you explain further on how to use them. The ammount of ingredients to what quantity of product. Any further info will be very much appreciated.
            Regards
            Peter--- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "Jim Creighton" <jcreighton@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > A while back, <waljaco> posted some commercial gin recipes.
            > I took the liberty to convert them to grams measurement, using his formulas, in a spreadsheet, for easy reading.
            >
            > I have uploaded the result in pdf format to the Files section.
            >
            > Cheers, Jim
            >




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          • blueeyedpilot69
            Bob, You mention the basket in the carterhead still. To duplicate this process I was considering placing the botanicals in a hop bag and loosely packing that
            Message 5 of 16 , Apr 26, 2009
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              Bob,
              You mention the basket in the carterhead still. To duplicate this process I was considering placing the botanicals in a hop bag and loosely packing that into the column. As always, any and all opinions appreciated.

              Dale

              Messaged edited...Dale try and cut the old stuff from your messages when posting...Cheers Ken Mc Moderator
            • Robert Hubble
              Dale, That must have been the part of that posting that was Wal s famous gin posting. I ve never used the carterhead configuration, after seeing that many, if
              Message 6 of 16 , Apr 26, 2009
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                Dale,

                That must have been the part of that posting that was Wal's famous gin posting. I've never used the carterhead configuration, after seeing that many, if not most, gin distillers just dump their botanicals in the boiler, wait some time, and then start their run.

                I approximate that process by steeping the recipe of botanicals I listed in about a liter of 50% for about a week, and then running it through my coffeepot still (with botanicals still in the wash) until there's no more flavor coming across. *Then* I mix that concentrate with neutral to get my gin.

                Works like a charm, and closely follows major gin distillers principles.

                However, I don't see why your hop bag wouldn't work.

                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




                To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                From: blueeyedpilot69@...
                Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 01:08:17 +0000
                Subject: [Distillers] Re: Commercial Gin Recipes



                Bob,
                You mention the basket in the carterhead still. To duplicate this process I was considering placing the botanicals in a hop bag and loosely packing that into the column. As always, any and all opinions appreciated.

                Dale

                Messaged edited...Dale try and cut the old stuff from your messages when posting...Cheers Ken Mc Moderator



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              • Harry
                ... I don t think that s a wise idea. There s potential there for a column blockage when the botanicals cook (steam remember) and render down into a mushy
                Message 7 of 16 , Apr 27, 2009
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                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "blueeyedpilot69" <blueeyedpilot69@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > Bob,
                  > You mention the basket in the carterhead still. To duplicate this process I was considering placing the botanicals in a hop bag and loosely packing that into the column. As always, any and all opinions appreciated.
                  >
                  > Dale


                  I don't think that's a wise idea. There's potential there for a column blockage when the botanicals cook (steam remember) and render down into a mushy mass. They'll form a wad or plug. You need a rigid porous framework (basket) to hold the mass and allow steam to penetrate effectively without shooting the thing out the top of your still.
                  Personally I think botanicals in a muslin bag inside your boiler is equally as effective. They never get scorched and there's no flirting with danger. My 2 pesos.


                  Slainte!
                  regards Harry
                • blueeyedpilot69
                  Harry ... Thanks for the input. I can see your point with the bag possibly creating a plug. The reason that I like the idea of the carterhead design is to
                  Message 8 of 16 , Apr 27, 2009
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                    Harry ...

                    Thanks for the input. I can see your point with the bag possibly creating a plug. The reason that I like the idea of the carterhead design is to get the very light and flowery part of the infusion. I will give both a try and possibly run the botanicals in the column in some type of metal basket, and VERY closely monitor the head pressure.


                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                    >
                    > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "blueeyedpilot69" <blueeyedpilot69@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Bob,
                    > > You mention the basket in the carterhead still. To duplicate this process I was considering placing the botanicals in a hop bag and loosely packing that into the column. As always, any and all opinions appreciated.
                    > >
                    > > Dale
                    >
                    >
                    > I don't think that's a wise idea. There's potential there for a column blockage when the botanicals cook (steam remember) and render down into a mushy mass. They'll form a wad or plug. You need a rigid porous framework (basket) to hold the mass and allow steam to penetrate effectively without shooting the thing out the top of your still.
                    > Personally I think botanicals in a muslin bag inside your boiler is equally as effective. They never get scorched and there's no flirting with danger. My 2 pesos.
                    >
                    >
                    > Slainte!
                    > regards Harry
                    >
                  • waljaco
                    The botanicals are not placed in a Carterhead column but in a separate unit which resembles a thumper. Placing them in the head apace of the boiler would be
                    Message 9 of 16 , Apr 27, 2009
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                      The botanicals are not placed in a Carterhead column but in a separate unit which resembles a thumper. Placing them in the head apace of the boiler would be similar. Personally I think macerating and redistilling is more efficient way to extract essential oils.
                      wal
                      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                      >
                      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "blueeyedpilot69" <blueeyedpilot69@> wrote:
                      > >
                      > > Bob,
                      > > You mention the basket in the carterhead still. To duplicate this process I was considering placing the botanicals in a hop bag and loosely packing that into the column. As always, any and all opinions appreciated.
                      > >
                      > > Dale
                      >
                      >
                      > I don't think that's a wise idea. There's potential there for a column blockage when the botanicals cook (steam remember) and render down into a mushy mass. They'll form a wad or plug. You need a rigid porous framework (basket) to hold the mass and allow steam to penetrate effectively without shooting the thing out the top of your still.
                      > Personally I think botanicals in a muslin bag inside your boiler is equally as effective. They never get scorched and there's no flirting with danger. My 2 pesos.
                      >
                      >
                      > Slainte!
                      > regards Harry
                      >
                    • blueeyedpilot69
                      Thanks Wal.... Not that concerned with the most efficient method. Wanting a method that will provide a somewhat softer botanical aspect. Will keep everyone
                      Message 10 of 16 , Apr 27, 2009
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                        Thanks Wal....
                        Not that concerned with the most efficient method. Wanting a method that will provide a somewhat softer botanical aspect. Will keep everyone posted on results.

                        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > The botanicals are not placed in a Carterhead column but in a separate unit which resembles a thumper. Placing them in the head apace of the boiler would be similar. Personally I think macerating and redistilling is more efficient way to extract essential oils.
                        > wal
                        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
                        > >
                        > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "blueeyedpilot69" <blueeyedpilot69@> wrote:
                        > > >
                        > > > Bob,
                        > > > You mention the basket in the carterhead still. To duplicate this process I was considering placing the botanicals in a hop bag and loosely packing that into the column. As always, any and all opinions appreciated.
                        > > >
                        > > > Dale
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > I don't think that's a wise idea. There's potential there for a column blockage when the botanicals cook (steam remember) and render down into a mushy mass. They'll form a wad or plug. You need a rigid porous framework (basket) to hold the mass and allow steam to penetrate effectively without shooting the thing out the top of your still.
                        > > Personally I think botanicals in a muslin bag inside your boiler is equally as effective. They never get scorched and there's no flirting with danger. My 2 pesos.
                        > >
                        > >
                        > > Slainte!
                        > > regards Harry
                        > >
                        >
                      • Zapata Vive
                        I ve thought about doing this myself, although I admittedly haven t yet. But I ve figured out lots of ways to suspend the botanicals in the headspace of the
                        Message 11 of 16 , Apr 27, 2009
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                          I've thought about doing this myself, although I admittedly haven't yet.  But I've figured out lots of ways to suspend the botanicals in the headspace of the boiler.  From stainless steamer baskets hanging from the bolts that hold my flange on to mesh bags hung from string that runs straight through the column.
                           
                          Seems WAY safer to not put them in the column at all.
                           
                          IF you really wanted to put them in the column, perhaps you could use a length of tube smaller than your column, say 1.5" inch in a 2" column.  Perforate the heck out of this inner tube and use it to hold your botanicals while allowing plenty of safety.
                           
                          ----- Original Message -----
                          Sent: Monday, April 27, 2009 12:31 PM
                          Subject: [Distillers] Re: Commercial Gin Recipes

                          Thanks Wal....
                          Not that concerned with the most efficient method. Wanting a method that will provide a somewhat softer botanical aspect. Will keep everyone posted on results.

                          --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@... > wrote:
                          >
                          > The botanicals are not placed in a Carterhead column but in a separate unit which resembles a thumper. Placing them in the head apace of the boiler would be similar. Personally I think macerating and redistilling is more efficient way to extract essential oils.
                          > wal
                          > --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@ > wrote:
                          > >
                          > > --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "blueeyedpilot69" <blueeyedpilot69@ > wrote:
                          > > >
                          > > > Bob,
                          > > > You mention the basket in the carterhead still. To duplicate this process I was considering placing the botanicals in a hop bag and loosely packing that into the column. As always, any and all opinions appreciated.
                          > > >
                          > > > Dale
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > I don't think that's a wise idea. There's potential there for a column blockage when the botanicals cook (steam remember) and render down into a mushy mass. They'll form a wad or plug. You need a rigid porous framework (basket) to hold the mass and allow steam to penetrate effectively without shooting the thing out the top of your still.
                          > > Personally I think botanicals in a muslin bag inside your boiler is equally as effective. They never get scorched and there's no flirting with danger. My 2 pesos.
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Slainte!
                          > > regards Harry
                          > >
                          >

                        • Robert Hubble
                          Wal, I agree completely, and the quality is excellent. I ve done it that way many times. Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com From:
                          Message 12 of 16 , Apr 27, 2009
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                            Wal,

                            I agree completely, and the quality is excellent. I've done it that way many times.

                            Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




                            To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                            From: waljaco@...
                            Date: Mon, 27 Apr 2009 14:34:00 +0000
                            Subject: [Distillers] Re: Commercial Gin Recipes



                            The botanicals are not placed in a Carterhead column but in a separate unit which resembles a thumper. Placing them in the head apace of the boiler would be similar. Personally I think macerating and redistilling is more efficient way to extract essential oils.
                            wal
                            --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@ ...> wrote:
                            >
                            > --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "blueeyedpilot69" <blueeyedpilot69@ > wrote:
                            > >
                            ----snip----


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                          • KM Services
                            There is an interesting video on you tube about beefeater gin production which is worth a watch http://tinyurl.com/dg3m3z Ken Mc
                            Message 13 of 16 , Apr 27, 2009
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                              There is an interesting video on “you tube “about beefeater gin production which is worth a watch http://tinyurl.com/dg3m3z

                               

                              Ken Mc

                               

                               

                            • rye_junkie1
                              ... Personally I think macerating and redistilling is more efficient way to extract essential oils. ... Wal, I agree completely, and the quality is excellent.
                              Message 14 of 16 , Apr 29, 2009
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                                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:

                                Personally I think macerating and redistilling is more efficient way to extract essential oils.
                                > wal


                                Wal,

                                I agree completely, and the quality is excellent. I've done it that way many times.

                                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


                                I go this route myself. I really want to try the "thumper" method one day and also want to give Z Bobs #1 essence a go but right now I have made about 10 liters from the "basic Gin recipe" Wal posted a few months back. I omitted the angelica and replaced it with 50/50 juniper/cardamom. It makes a very nice, strong flavored Gin. I steep it 4L at a time at 50% for 3 days. Cut it to 30%, dump it ALL in the pot and distill it to 208F. I would take it over Bombay sapphire or rangpur lime any day. You really dont have to distill it. I have been in a pinch for a gin and tonic and just run a few oz through a coffee filter. It just looks more appealing in the clear distilled form.

                                Mason
                              • ethohmakr
                                There are some experiments over on AD and HD using a thumper for gin. Overnight maceration and then botanicals and neutral in the thumper, water in the
                                Message 15 of 16 , May 23, 2009
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                                  There are some experiments over on AD and HD using a thumper for gin. Overnight maceration and then botanicals and neutral in the thumper, water in the boiler.

                                  It's interesting because the flavors come over separately. This allows making flavor cuts, blending and evaluation to refine the recipe.
                                • rye_junkie1
                                  ... Links? Mason
                                  Message 16 of 16 , May 23, 2009
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                                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "ethohmakr" <ethohmakr@...> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > There are some experiments over on AD and HD using a thumper for gin. Overnight maceration and then botanicals and neutral in the thumper, water in the boiler.
                                    >
                                    > It's interesting because the flavors come over separately. This allows making flavor cuts, blending and evaluation to refine the recipe.
                                    >

                                    Links?

                                    Mason
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