Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.
 

Re: Flow drilling

Expand Messages
  • jamesonbeam1
    Hi Zap, I deleted your first message, but still no picts came thru. You need to send it using the Rich-Text Editor (Beta)
    Message 1 of 2 , Jan 19, 2009

      Hi Zap,

      I deleted your first message, but still no picts came thru.  You need to send it using the Rich-Text Editor (Beta) located above the reply window or new message window.  This will allow you to insert picts in HTML format.

      The other way to do it is upload your pictures into the photo section on the left then copy the link to them - That is the usual way most members here do it.

      First click on "Create Album" and follow the instructions from there.  Then you can upload your pictures and copy the link and put it in your posting like this:

      http://groups.yahoo.com/group/new_distillers/photos/album/480722477/pic/1119033921/view?picmode=&mode=tn&order=ordinal&start=1&count=20&dir=asc

      using the Rich Text Editor, or just copy and paste it to the posting like this:

      pic+drawing+recipe+instruction

      Try it again.

      Vino es Veritas,

      Jim aka Waldo  (wow, finally did some moderator stuff :)).

      Note. If you want I can set up your photo album.

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Zapata Vive" <zapatavive@...> wrote:
      >
      > (if ya'll get the messages as email, please delete the last message, and if you want to save the pics, save these, not those, thanks all)
      >
      > So a while back I mentioned I finally figured out flow drilling. Here are some shots I've made recently. As a reminder, by far the most useful thing I've found for flow drilling is a typical countersink drill bit, shown in two of the pictures. I tried wood chucks, headless nails, bolts, pipe, backwards drill bits, all sorts of stuff. Nothing really worked like I thought it should until I tried the counters sink bits.
      >
      > Here is a hole made in scrap (flattened 2" pipe). I used a 5/8 inch bit (shown), and it perfectly fits 1/2" nominal pipe. On the left is the flow hole, on the right is a standard 5/8" bit.
      >
      >
      >
      > Here is a 1/4" hole I made with a 1/4" counter sink bit, not the big bit pictured.
      >
      >
      >
      > And here I put it to use and fashioned a funnel for my parrot's beak. I started with a standard 1" end cap. Annealed it with heat. Used a variety of implements to beat it into a loose cone shape, drilled a small pilot hole, then used the 1/4" countersink bit to flow drill the bottom. I think this turned out great, although I learned that a pilot hole will make the "collar" shorter. In the future I'll use a regular bit to drill about half way through, not making a full pilot hole. I think this would have made the collar a little longer like in the scrap above.
      >
      >
      >
      > And just a note, the big hole I did in a drill press, but both the 1/4" holes I did just with a power drill on the bench. Drill press is nice, but not necessary if your hand is steady, your shoulder strong, and your work doesn't move. Another tip, heat your work up with a torch, makes the flow drilling go faster so you don't have to do all the heating with the bit. Oh, and the work really will get hot, got hot enough to make my leather gloves smoke and set the saw dust on fire. Use heavy gloves or have your work clamped down somewhere. It takes a while, probably about 10 minutes for the first hole, then maybe 5 min or less for subsequent holes as your work will already be hot.
      >
      > Thanks to whoever put that file up as it was the first I'd heard about flow drilling, and now I'm absolutely in love with the idea. I just really want to find a 1 1/8 counter sink to make holes for 1" pipe, but I don't think they make them that big. If anybody has any ideas on what would make good large flow bits, please share!
      >

    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.