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Re: Boiling Trub

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  • Harry
    ... suggested ... this ... seen/read ... The nutrients we are trying to recover are locked inside the yeast cells in the trub. During fermentation, the yeast
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 16, 2008
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "zap_1961" <scottkstanley@...> wrote:
      >
      > A reply to another post today had me asking myself why is it
      suggested
      > to boil the Trub before adding some into the next wash. I assume you
      > are trying to kill off any nasties, but at the same time, doesn't
      this
      > actually kill off the nutrients as is the usual reason I have
      seen/read
      > to add the Trub?
      >
      > Maybe it's needed for the non-organic nutrients (mineral/chemical)
      > instead of bio material?
      >
      > Maybe the reason is for consistency or flavor?
      >
      > Scott
      >


      The nutrients we are trying to recover are locked inside the yeast
      cells in the trub.

      During fermentation, the yeast metabolism process takes up vitamins &
      minerals for sustenance, just as all living organisms do. When the
      ferment is done, the yeast go dormant as a way of surviving.

      So, we have billions of little packages of nutrients (dormant & active
      yeast cells). This brings up the question of how to get those spent
      little packets to release their payload (nutrients) into a new wash
      where there's new yeast that need the nutrients for growth.

      Answer: BOIL the trub. This splits the old yeast cells and they spill
      their contents, the nutrients. We now have an environment rich in all
      the things new yeast needs to grow and multiply, which it has to do
      before it can make our alcohol.

      Why not just continue with the old yeast (not boiled)? Well in sour-
      mashing and back-slopping we do, but yeasts, just like humans, grow old
      and no longer perform work well. After several generations they quit
      working. Some even mutate into yeasts that make undesirable by-
      products. Much the same reason that old humans that produce offspring
      have a higher rate of degeneration in their children.

      So after several generations of backsetting, we need to introduce fresh
      vigorous yeast (which is really 1st generation offspring of a desirable
      source yeast, grown for market).

      Life is a complicated businness, ain't it?


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
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