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Re: rum before aging

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  • mike karnowski
    ... luckily it s available in dry yeast form from White Labs: Danstil EDV 493 Active dried yeast which was isolated and selected by INRA Guadeloupe on cane
    Message 1 of 37 , Nov 15, 2008
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      >Some time ago I asked my molasses suppler if I could get unwashed
      >sugar cane stalks so I could try to propagate the sugar cane yeast
      >but I live too far from the areas that grow it, but was good to hear
      >that you liked it. I might have to try harder to get it now that I
      >know its tasty as well.

      luckily it's available in dry yeast form from White Labs:
      Danstil EDV 493
      Active dried yeast which was isolated and selected by INRA Guadeloupe on cane molasses. For use in beverage fermentations. Available in 400 gram package.

      >Like I have mentioned previously about
      >bottling the dunder is it give the dunder time to settle out any
      >sediments like yeast that had not settled out the fermented wash.
      >Did you have a centrifuge where worked? I would love one but can't
      >afford one so time is cheaper.

      Well, we had a 1800 gallon pot still that we would load the wash into along with around 400 gallons of dunder. After the stripping run we would let the still cool overnight then pump off 400 gallons of dunder for the next run. We pumped it off from an outlet several feet from the bottom of the pot so no sediment. Cleaning out the pot still was quite a chore, there would be big chunks of cooked molasses solids the consistency of brownies, we would have to climb inside and hand out big sheets of this stuff. We called it Elvis' Colon. :^}

      >Clarifying the molasses with hot water just drops any crap and sludge
      >in the molasses, for me I get mainly get a sand like grit and metal
      >filings. If your getting high quality molasses or high test
      >molasses.

      we used only grade A molasses for human consumption, fresh from local sugar cane, really yummy stuff. After we diluted it with hot water to make it easier to transfer I would see the a tiny bit of the "metal shavings" at the bottom of the mixer you talk about, they would just stay at the bottom and not get sucked out into the fermenter.

      >One last thing Mike, can you please explain the paragraph below, I
      >don't know what you mean about your method of cuts, but I would like
      >to understand what you are saying.

      "> Also the redistillation of heads and tails and adding the center
      cut back to the spirt run is as important if not more than dunder.
      The best rum we ever made there was 50% center cut of a heads and
      tails redistillation and 50% rum made with the wild sugar cane yeast.
      A year and a half in a small barrel and it is phenomenal."

      We would save all the heads and tails from the spirit runs, then once every several weeks we would take all the heads and tails (about 100 gallons), dilute them down a bit (to around 100 proof) then redistill them, discarding the heads and tails of this run. The hearts of this run are VERY intense flavored but need years of aging to become palatable. Normally we would just blend it back into future spirit runs but occasionally we would add a large amount into a barrel with another rum specifically for long term aging. None of that is available to the public yet, maybe in a few years.

      Hope this helps. -m
    • mike karnowski
      ... luckily it s available in dry yeast form from White Labs: Danstil EDV 493 Active dried yeast which was isolated and selected by INRA Guadeloupe on cane
      Message 37 of 37 , Nov 15, 2008
      • 0 Attachment
        >Some time ago I asked my molasses suppler if I could get unwashed
        >sugar cane stalks so I could try to propagate the sugar cane yeast
        >but I live too far from the areas that grow it, but was good to hear
        >that you liked it. I might have to try harder to get it now that I
        >know its tasty as well.

        luckily it's available in dry yeast form from White Labs:
        Danstil EDV 493
        Active dried yeast which was isolated and selected by INRA Guadeloupe on cane molasses. For use in beverage fermentations. Available in 400 gram package.

        >Like I have mentioned previously about
        >bottling the dunder is it give the dunder time to settle out any
        >sediments like yeast that had not settled out the fermented wash.
        >Did you have a centrifuge where worked? I would love one but can't
        >afford one so time is cheaper.

        Well, we had a 1800 gallon pot still that we would load the wash into along with around 400 gallons of dunder. After the stripping run we would let the still cool overnight then pump off 400 gallons of dunder for the next run. We pumped it off from an outlet several feet from the bottom of the pot so no sediment. Cleaning out the pot still was quite a chore, there would be big chunks of cooked molasses solids the consistency of brownies, we would have to climb inside and hand out big sheets of this stuff. We called it Elvis' Colon. :^}

        >Clarifying the molasses with hot water just drops any crap and sludge
        >in the molasses, for me I get mainly get a sand like grit and metal
        >filings. If your getting high quality molasses or high test
        >molasses.

        we used only grade A molasses for human consumption, fresh from local sugar cane, really yummy stuff. After we diluted it with hot water to make it easier to transfer I would see the a tiny bit of the "metal shavings" at the bottom of the mixer you talk about, they would just stay at the bottom and not get sucked out into the fermenter.

        >One last thing Mike, can you please explain the paragraph below, I
        >don't know what you mean about your method of cuts, but I would like
        >to understand what you are saying.

        "> Also the redistillation of heads and tails and adding the center
        cut back to the spirt run is as important if not more than dunder.
        The best rum we ever made there was 50% center cut of a heads and
        tails redistillation and 50% rum made with the wild sugar cane yeast.
        A year and a half in a small barrel and it is phenomenal."

        We would save all the heads and tails from the spirit runs, then once every several weeks we would take all the heads and tails (about 100 gallons), dilute them down a bit (to around 100 proof) then redistill them, discarding the heads and tails of this run. The hearts of this run are VERY intense flavored but need years of aging to become palatable. Normally we would just blend it back into future spirit runs but occasionally we would add a large amount into a barrel with another rum specifically for long term aging. None of that is available to the public yet, maybe in a few years.

        Hope this helps. -m
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