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Re: anyone have a recipe for poitin?

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  • waljaco
    Confiscated mashes do not mention potatoes - potatoes do not give a great yield. Originally sacks of barley were soaked in bog water and poitin was an unaged
    Message 1 of 10 , Oct 25, 2008
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      Confiscated mashes do not mention potatoes - potatoes do not give a
      great yield.
      Originally sacks of barley were soaked in bog water and poitin was an
      unaged malt whiskey. Later, treacle etc. were used.
      wal
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <mauger81@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Looking for a grain bill for some traditional Irish moonshine. I've
      > > searched but most of the links in older messages are broken. I've
      got
      > > a friend with a three tier brew tree and lots of all-grain experience
      > > so I think I might enlist his help.
      > >
      >
      > Actually there are too many recipes in existence to define a true
      > poitin. Some use potatoes as their main ingredient and some (most?)
      > add sugar to boost the SG. If you want to go traditional I'd suggest
      > all malted barley or malted barley (10-20%) + some other grain
      > (unmalted barley, rye, oat or even wheat). All malt is the simplest
      > and traditionally the methods of mashing were not very complex.
      > Economy was also quite vital, so assuming enough knowledge about
      > mashing technology malt + cheap grain was the other way to go.
      >
      > Cheers, Riku
      >
    • Matt
      Wow thanks JP, thats pretty interesting. Thanks everyone else for the input as well. So it sounds like traditional equated to anything fermentable and
      Message 2 of 10 , Oct 27, 2008
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        Wow thanks JP, thats pretty interesting. Thanks everyone else for the
        input as well. So it sounds like "traditional" equated to "anything
        fermentable and cheap/free/on-hand". I can get on board with that.
        Maybe I'll try a 50/25/25 barley, oats and rye and see how it goes.
        As far as the oats, can you use regular rolled oats (Quaker oatmeal
        style), or is there something different my LHBS would sell as an
        adjunct?


        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mtnwalker2" <mtnwalker2@...>
        wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hello Matt,
        >
        > Its been a long time since I posted the results I had trying ot make
        > poitin. Here's a synopsis.
        >
        > First, I did a full mash of rolled oats, using just packeged
        enzymes.
        > Conversion was fair, but disaster awaited, as no way could i
        > efficiently sepperate the gruel from the wash after fermentation.
        >
        > Next, i obtained a 50# bag of oat berries, and did 3 different
        > batches simultainiously. I ran the berries through my grain crusher
        > to the consistancy of crushed barly malt. First batch, i did as a
        > full mash conversion and fermented on the grain. Second batch, using
        > some of the first mash conversion grains, i did as a sweet (sugar
        > added) ferment, and finally the third i treated exactly like an UJSM
        > wash. Each was 25L and i carefully and slowly pot stilled?? with a
        > short packed column with only a very little touch of reflux. It is
        an
        > exceptional whisky white. Many have said it is the best whishy I
        have
        > ever made, and better than any they had bought.
        > Surprisingly, all 3 were almost undetectable from each other.
        >
        > Then, I had a friend visit from CA who had spent almost 2 years in
        > Irland as a barkeep in a small village. He is the kind of person who
        > makes friends immediately, and wins trust easily. It took him over a
        > year asking gently for a taste of local poitin, before one morning
        he
        > found several bottles laid on his doorstep. No card or word. There
        > were several therafter. He never knew who.
        >
        > Anyway, he said my oat whisky was the closest he had ever tasted to
        > those bottles, though mine was much milder and smoother. (single run
        > with some reflux)! He honestly, liked mine better!!!!
        >
        > This makes a great drink, neat or with a splash of spring water.
        Easy
        > to do, and then you could add other grains to your taste.
        >
        > I used whiskey yeast with AG for all ferments, on the grain.
        >
        > From other posts, doesn't sound like true poitin, but its good and
        > was very close to what my friend had delivered. Maybe a starting
        > point?
        >
        > All my best, JP The Mountain Walker
        >
        >
        >
      • waljaco
        Traditional does not equate with anything fermentable. Tradition evolves - Poitin mashes evolved due to economic change. e.g. Guiness Brewery took most of the
        Message 3 of 10 , Oct 27, 2008
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          Traditional does not equate with anything fermentable. Tradition
          evolves -
          Poitin mashes evolved due to economic change. e.g. Guiness Brewery
          took most of the malted barley as an example so alternatives were
          used. The addition of unmalted grain and sugar for example.
          Try a traditional Donegal 'pracas' mix of barley and oats.
          Grains give 4 times the alcohol yield compared to potatoes
          (tatters).
          wal
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <mauger81@...> wrote:
          >
          > Wow thanks JP, thats pretty interesting. Thanks everyone else for
          the
          > input as well. So it sounds like "traditional" equated
          to "anything
          > fermentable and cheap/free/on-hand". I can get on board with
          that.
          > Maybe I'll try a 50/25/25 barley, oats and rye and see how it
          goes.
          > As far as the oats, can you use regular rolled oats (Quaker oatmeal
          > style), or is there something different my LHBS would sell as an
          > adjunct?
          >
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "mtnwalker2" <mtnwalker2@>
          > wrote:
          > >
          > >
          > > Hello Matt,
          > >
          > > Its been a long time since I posted the results I had trying ot
          make
          > > poitin. Here's a synopsis.
          > >
          > > First, I did a full mash of rolled oats, using just packeged
          > enzymes.
          > > Conversion was fair, but disaster awaited, as no way could i
          > > efficiently sepperate the gruel from the wash after fermentation.
          > >
          > > Next, i obtained a 50# bag of oat berries, and did 3 different
          > > batches simultainiously. I ran the berries through my grain
          crusher
          > > to the consistancy of crushed barly malt. First batch, i did as a
          > > full mash conversion and fermented on the grain. Second batch,
          using
          > > some of the first mash conversion grains, i did as a sweet (sugar
          > > added) ferment, and finally the third i treated exactly like an
          UJSM
          > > wash. Each was 25L and i carefully and slowly pot stilled?? with
          a
          > > short packed column with only a very little touch of reflux. It
          is
          > an
          > > exceptional whisky white. Many have said it is the best whishy I
          > have
          > > ever made, and better than any they had bought.
          > > Surprisingly, all 3 were almost undetectable from each other.
          > >
          > > Then, I had a friend visit from CA who had spent almost 2 years
          in
          > > Irland as a barkeep in a small village. He is the kind of person
          who
          > > makes friends immediately, and wins trust easily. It took him
          over a
          > > year asking gently for a taste of local poitin, before one
          morning
          > he
          > > found several bottles laid on his doorstep. No card or word.
          There
          > > were several therafter. He never knew who.
          > >
          > > Anyway, he said my oat whisky was the closest he had ever tasted
          to
          > > those bottles, though mine was much milder and smoother. (single
          run
          > > with some reflux)! He honestly, liked mine better!!!!
          > >
          > > This makes a great drink, neat or with a splash of spring water.
          > Easy
          > > to do, and then you could add other grains to your taste.
          > >
          > > I used whiskey yeast with AG for all ferments, on the grain.
          > >
          > > From other posts, doesn't sound like true poitin, but its good
          and
          > > was very close to what my friend had delivered. Maybe a starting
          > > point?
          > >
          > > All my best, JP The Mountain Walker
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
        • mstehelin
          Would Dried potatoes give a good yield if properly mashed? ... I ve ... experience
          Message 4 of 10 , Oct 27, 2008
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            Would Dried potatoes give a good yield if properly mashed?



            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
            >
            > Confiscated mashes do not mention potatoes - potatoes do not give a
            > great yield.
            > Originally sacks of barley were soaked in bog water and poitin was an
            > unaged malt whiskey. Later, treacle etc. were used.
            > wal
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@>
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <mauger81@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Looking for a grain bill for some traditional Irish moonshine.
            I've
            > > > searched but most of the links in older messages are broken. I've
            > got
            > > > a friend with a three tier brew tree and lots of all-grain
            experience
            > > > so I think I might enlist his help.
            > > >
            > >
            > > Actually there are too many recipes in existence to define a true
            > > poitin. Some use potatoes as their main ingredient and some (most?)
            > > add sugar to boost the SG. If you want to go traditional I'd suggest
            > > all malted barley or malted barley (10-20%) + some other grain
            > > (unmalted barley, rye, oat or even wheat). All malt is the simplest
            > > and traditionally the methods of mashing were not very complex.
            > > Economy was also quite vital, so assuming enough knowledge about
            > > mashing technology malt + cheap grain was the other way to go.
            > >
            > > Cheers, Riku
            > >
            >
          • Derek Hamlet
            ... Potatoes are potatoes. They are mainly starch. Mashing won t do much. You need some enzymes to convert the starch to sugars. Just using potatoes won t
            Message 5 of 10 , Oct 27, 2008
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              At 01:02 PM 10/27/2008, you wrote:

              >Would Dried potatoes give a good yield if properly mashed?

              Potatoes are potatoes. They are mainly starch. Mashing won't do
              much. You need some enzymes to convert the starch to sugars.
              Just using potatoes won't give you much sugar for the yeast to work on.



              Derek
            • mtnwalker2
              Matt, Rolled oats, ie flaked oats, is what i used for the first try. Some have said that with a perfect mash conversion they would liquify. Mine never did, and
              Message 6 of 10 , Oct 28, 2008
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                Matt,

                Rolled oats, ie flaked oats, is what i used for the first try. Some
                have said that with a perfect mash conversion they would liquify. Mine
                never did, and it was still like seperateing the wort from oatmeal. The
                grains, with husks, or just the berries crushed worked great.

                I also just read on a beer brewing site, that there is now a malt
                extract for malted oats- not sure if it was DME or LME? That would be
                easist!

                Let us know the results-Please!

                JP

                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Matt" <mauger81@...> wrote:
                >
                > Wow thanks JP, thats pretty interesting. Thanks everyone else for
                the
                > input as well. So it sounds like "traditional" equated to "anything
                > fermentable and cheap/free/on-hand". I can get on board with that.
                > Maybe I'll try a 50/25/25 barley, oats and rye and see how it goes.
                > As far as the oats, can you use regular rolled oats (Quaker oatmeal
                > style), or is there something different my LHBS would sell as an
                > adjunct?
                >
                >
                >
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