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Re: Potato vodka, am I doing right?

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  • Vini
    Derek, in Sweden potatoe vodka has a tradition! When this new crop where introduced here in 17-18th century not many started growing it until they found out
    Message 1 of 8 , Oct 26, 2008
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      Derek, in Sweden potatoe vodka has a tradition! When this new crop
      where introduced here in 17-18th century not many started growing it
      until they found out that you could make spirits out of it. Today
      there are no potatoe based distilleries in Sweden, you have to go to
      Poland and let them make the vodka - or do it yourself :)

      You are quite right in that potatoes don't contain any sugar but
      neither do cereals like barley, wheat, corn etc. And it's a lot of
      work to convert the starch into fermentable sugar.

      Then why would I and others try to make vodka from plugs? Or from
      barley, corn, rye etc?

      The simple answer is taste! In the Grappa-like Karlsson's vodka you
      can feel the potatoe smell and taste and i whant to emulate this drink.

      Sugar based vodka is relatively easy to make perfect and has its
      purpose. Potatoe vodka and whisky, bourbon, rum are more complicated
      but some still try to do them.

      Taste and not simple alcohol is why I bother!

      /Vini


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Derek Hamlet <derekhamlet@...> wrote:
      >
      > This subject of "potato" vodka comes up on a fairly regular basis.
      > The answers are almost all the same and yet folks persist.
      > Can someone enlighten me.
      > Somehow, we have been lulled into believing that
      > there is a tradition out there of potato vodka.
      > There is not.
      > Potatoes for the most part contain very little
      > residual sugar and tons of starch.
      > That means in their natural state, there is
      > little for yeast to turn into alcohol.
      > Converting the starches into sugars requires enzymes. That's lots
      of work.
      > Why bother.
      > Traditionally vodkas were and are made from grains.
      > In some places rye, in others wheat.
      > Frankly I wouldn't waste my time, effort and money on potato vodka.
      > At 01:14 PM 10/4/2008, you wrote:
      >
      > >Looking to do a potato or even a sugar beet vodka, this seemed like a
      > >very interesting post but lacks some information, what enzymes, what
      > >yeast, thanks in advance.
      > >
      > >Ed
      > >
      > >--- In
      > ><mailto:Distillers%40yahoogroups.com>Distillers@yahoogroups.com,
      > >"Rasmus" <wineifera@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Why the low temperature for the malt premash? In beer making I
      usually
      > > > warm the dry malt grist to 65° before I add it to the water. And do
      > > > you have any idea about how much malt I need in total? I thought of
      > > > 5-10% but in recepies I've seen as low as 2%.
      > > >
      > > > As I'm for the taste I won't use turbo but there's no other options
      > > > here in Sweden except baking yest. Does the yeast/mash need any
      > > > nutrients? I would think not.
      > > >
      > > > /Vini
      > > >
      > > >
      > > > --- In
      > > <mailto:Distillers%40yahoogroups.com>Distillers@yahoogroups.com,
      > > Robert Thomas <whosbrewing@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > Hi Rasmus,
      > > > > using potatoes efficiently is a real skill (unless you resort to
      > > > > enzymes). You need to boil them until they (the starch) are
      > >gelatinised
      > > > > (ie the whole lot becomes thick like gravy). Then it is time
      to add
      > > > > whatever saccharifying agent you want to use: but be very
      aware that
      > > > > the potato mash holds a lot of heat. You would do better
      adding the
      > > > > potato mash to the enzyme source to prevent overheating of the
      > >enzymes.
      > > > > Or make really sure that the mash is below kill temps before
      you add
      > > > > the enzyme source.
      > > > > If I were doing as you are, I would boil the potatoes till they go
      > >into
      > > > > a mush of their own accord (watch for burning). At the same time I
      > > > > would take a good lager malt and mash it at ca 30degC. When the
      > > > > potatoes are ready and cooled enough, add slowly with lots of
      stirring
      > > > > to the lager mash: watch the temps!!
      > > > >
      > > > > You might want to do this on a small scale first off!!
      > > > >
      > > > > Or get proper enzymes: I will report on my experiments soon.
      > > > >
      > > > > Cheers
      > > > > Rob.
      > > > >
      > > > > --- Rasmus <wineifera@> wrote:
      > > > >
      > > > > > I tasted a New Potato Vodka at a wine and spirits fair
      recently that
      > > > > > I
      > > > > > really liked,
      > > <http://www.karlssonsvodka.com/.>http://www.karlssonsvodka.com/.
      > > Now at midsummer the
      > > > > > new
      > > > > > potatoes are really cheap here in Sweden and i bought 100 kg
      or so
      > > > > > for
      > > > > > less than 3 USD! Naturally I wanted to make a copy of this
      wonderful
      > > > > > snaps. I used pale ale malt for the conversion enzymes, but
      didn't
      > > > > > really succeed in my first mini test mash, so I need your
      help. Of
      > > > > > course I've searched the group and the net in both Swedish,
      English
      > > > > > and German but the recepies vary a lot. Most redepies
      include sugar
      > > > > > but I consider that cheating. I'm after the taste and I know
      how to
      > > > > > make neutral sugar vodka.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > In my mini mash attempt I used 1 kg of potatoes and 0.1 kg
      of malt
      > > > > > grist. I boiled the plugs for 30 minutes, poured all water away,
      > >made
      > > > > > a mash of them and added a third of the malt to get a good
      > > > > > liquification (best at 75°C), but the temp got too low
      (65°C) in the
      > > > > > process. Then i put it in blankets for an hour, when (I get my
      > >bright
      > > > > > moments)I turned the oven on and put the kettle ther for 120
      minutes
      > > > > > or more. The temp rose to 75°C, I also added water during
      this time
      > > > > > but never got that thin mash that I wanted. Late at night I put
      > > > > > blankets around and went to bed. Next morning i did a starch
      > > > > > conversion test and it showed, as suspected, no full
      conversion of
      > > > > > the
      > > > > > starches.
      > > > > >
      > > > > > I know it's difficult to get a minimash to appear like a 20
      times
      > > > > > bigger mash from previous beer experiments, but AM I DOING
      RIGHT?
      > > > > >
      > > > > > 1 Boiling until very soft
      > > > > > 2 Adding malt to liquify at 75°C
      > > > > > 3 Adding more malt to sacharify at 65-60°C-.....
      > > > > >
      > > > > > Any help appreciated!
      > > > > >
      > > > > > /Vini
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > > Cheers,
      > > > > Rob.
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >__________________________________________________________
      > > > > Sick sense of humor? Visit Yahoo! TV's
      > > > > Comedy with an Edge to see what's on, when.
      > > > >
      <http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/222>http://tv.yahoo.com/collections/222
      > > > >
      > > >
      > >
      > >
      > >No virus found in this incoming message.
      > >Checked by AVG - http://www.avg.com
      > >Version: 8.0.173 / Virus Database: 270.7.5/1708
      > >- Release Date: 10/4/2008 11:35 AM
      >
      > Derek
      >
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