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Fwd: Re: Still Potty about Poteen

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  • waljaco
    ... wrote: Publishing books is too hard - just ask Mike Nixon. Doing research is the fun part. The law in Ireland should look at another small
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 25, 2008
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco <waljaco@...>"
      <waljaco@...> wrote:

      Publishing books is too hard - just ask Mike Nixon. Doing research is
      the fun part.
      The law in Ireland should look at another small island country
      downunder and stop acting like a continuation of foreign rule. Home
      distillers in Ireland are so scared, that it is almost impossible to
      find a written recipe, whereas there are many Russian samogon sites
      now.

      I have formed the opinion that early poitin was raw single (barley)
      malt whiskey. Peat was the heat source. Later to cut costs (possibly
      in line with Scottish practice) malted barley and other grains
      (wheat, oats, rye)were used. The use of treacle (molasses) is
      mentioned, as is raw (brown) sugar, (one source says sugar was used
      after 1880). Currently barley and sugar, or even sugarbeet pulp is
      mentioned. I would imagine if potatoes were not suitable for eating,
      that they would be used too. Potatoes, were once an essential staple
      in the Irish diet (in 1845, consumption was 5 kg/day), and even now
      140 kg/head/year are consumed. 1 acre could feed a family for a year.
      Larger farms grew grain that was used as a cash crop. It is all a
      matter of convenience and economics. I doubt whether potatoes were
      used before the 1900's the time they became the principal source for
      vodka in Estonia. A similar story is seen with U.S. moonshine and
      Russian samogon.
      The Irish pot still and the Scottish pot still are similar and have
      basically simplified the geometry of the alchemist's alembic still. A
      similar shape is often seen in the U.S.probably brought over by
      Celtic immigrants.
      See 'A Phoit Dubh/A Pot Still'
      http://www.ndirect.co.uk/~iforshaw/Mag22/page2.html
      Wal

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Aaron Pelly" <apelly@m...> wrote:
      >
      >
      > When are you publishing your book Wal? :-)
      >
      > Aaron.

      --- End forwarded message ---
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