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RE: [Distillers] Harry (and others)- what is your current malt whisky wash recipe

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  • Robert Hubble
    Mark, I m sure not Harry, but I have some strong opinions about what you ask, and perhaps some insight. First off, any grain whisk(e)y making is a lot of work,
    Message 1 of 10 , Aug 8, 2008
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      Mark,

      I'm sure not Harry, but I have some strong opinions about what
      you ask, and perhaps some insight.

      First off, any grain whisk(e)y making is a lot of work, and *could*
      be a pain in the ass if you are not either pure of heart or just
      plain simple. By the time you mash multiple low-gravity grain
      washes, maybe with backset, sparge, distill a bunch of those
      washes to get enough low wines, and make cuts that exclude
      a lot of your hard-earned ethanol, you have expended a
      tremendous amount of effort. It seems downright wasteful.

      Commercial distillers have understood this for centuries, and
      many have evolved methods for cheating, chiseling, and cutting
      corners, so they can make more money per batch. Higher ABV
      wash? Sure, hold your nose and do it. Bottle more heads and
      tails? Why not; the Philistines can't tell the difference. (Reference
      here to the great scene in Joseph Heller's "Catch22" where
      the mess sargeant mashes laundry soap into the sweet potatoes,
      and everyone loves it) And of course, if you've cut all those
      corners, you're sure as *hell* not going to age that crap 30
      years.

      On the other hand, as a home distiller, you're not necessarily
      bound to making economical whisk(e)y, and you can decide
      for yourself what kind of whisk(e)y you'll make. You can make
      a hootch as nasty as you want, or you can aspire to ambrosia.
      You may not quite achieve the latter, but the former's easy as
      pie.

      For me, it just never made sense to aspire to swill.

      Last weekend, at a party of a very close friend, we were
      sipping wine on the deck when the cry went up, "Andy's
      bringing out the fruit jars!", and I knew it was my stuff that
      I had given him over the years. In all those jars was a pint,
      half full on oak chips, of a yellow plum brandy I'd made 3+
      years earlier, that had somehow escaped the "death by a
      thousand sips".

      Aged 3 years, I think that is the best stuff I've ever made,
      and rivals the best brandy I've ever tasted (later batches of
      yellow plum never quite stood up to that one). Having done
      that with brandy, I'm sure I can do it with whisk(e)y also,
      but I understand it'll take some effort.

      Anyway, before you start, make up your mind which you want,
      economical whisk(e)y, simple whisk(e)y, efficient whisk(e)y,
      or good whisk(e)y, and then your path will be clear.

      (I have this urge to end that sentence with "little
      grasshopper", but that's just my weirdness)

      I hope this helps.


      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      From: bordermeister@...
      Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 14:32:21 +0000
      Subject: [Distillers] Harry (and others)- what is your current malt whisky wash recipe

      Hi Harry, I started a while ago and used your simple whisky wash
      recipe with good results, strayed into the realm of clean vodka and
      have come back to true artisan spirits.

      I have made several 'Glenmorangie' clone runs - the latest needs its
      spirit run hopefully this weekend. The latest are getting better but
      are a fair bit of effort/cost compared to your (Harry's) original recipe.

      I now have a nice flavourful feints collection and am wondering if the
      effort of the 'Glenmorangie' clone recipe is worth the cost/effort.

      I realise this all comes down to personal preference, however I hold a
      great deal of respect for your hard earned knowledge, and was just
      curious to know how your current whisky wash is comprised - if you do
      not mind sharing your hard earned knowledge on this.

      Many Thanks
      Mark

      PS - I am a convert into trying to make a true quality homemade whisky
      after all of my forays.




      Get Windows Live and get whatever you need, wherever you are. Start here.
    • Sherman
      Well said ZB! Your common sense prohibits you from any political position. I always appreciate a good dose of NON-BS ... whisky wash recipe ... whisky wash ...
      Message 2 of 10 , Aug 8, 2008
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        Well said ZB! Your common sense prohibits you from any political
        position. I always appreciate a good dose of NON-BS

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Mark,
        >
        > I'm sure not Harry, but I have some strong opinions about what
        > you ask, and perhaps some insight.
        >
        > First off, any grain whisk(e)y making is a lot of work, and *could*
        > be a pain in the ass if you are not either pure of heart or just
        > plain simple. By the time you mash multiple low-gravity grain
        > washes, maybe with backset, sparge, distill a bunch of those
        > washes to get enough low wines, and make cuts that exclude
        > a lot of your hard-earned ethanol, you have expended a
        > tremendous amount of effort. It seems downright wasteful.
        >
        > Commercial distillers have understood this for centuries, and
        > many have evolved methods for cheating, chiseling, and cutting
        > corners, so they can make more money per batch. Higher ABV
        > wash? Sure, hold your nose and do it. Bottle more heads and
        > tails? Why not; the Philistines can't tell the difference. (Reference
        > here to the great scene in Joseph Heller's "Catch22" where
        > the mess sargeant mashes laundry soap into the sweet potatoes,
        > and everyone loves it) And of course, if you've cut all those
        > corners, you're sure as *hell* not going to age that crap 30
        > years.
        >
        > On the other hand, as a home distiller, you're not necessarily
        > bound to making economical whisk(e)y, and you can decide
        > for yourself what kind of whisk(e)y you'll make. You can make
        > a hootch as nasty as you want, or you can aspire to ambrosia.
        > You may not quite achieve the latter, but the former's easy as
        > pie.
        >
        > For me, it just never made sense to aspire to swill.
        >
        > Last weekend, at a party of a very close friend, we were
        > sipping wine on the deck when the cry went up, "Andy's
        > bringing out the fruit jars!", and I knew it was my stuff that
        > I had given him over the years. In all those jars was a pint,
        > half full on oak chips, of a yellow plum brandy I'd made 3+
        > years earlier, that had somehow escaped the "death by a
        > thousand sips".
        >
        > Aged 3 years, I think that is the best stuff I've ever made,
        > and rivals the best brandy I've ever tasted (later batches of
        > yellow plum never quite stood up to that one). Having done
        > that with brandy, I'm sure I can do it with whisk(e)y also,
        > but I understand it'll take some effort.
        >
        > Anyway, before you start, make up your mind which you want,
        > economical whisk(e)y, simple whisk(e)y, efficient whisk(e)y,
        > or good whisk(e)y, and then your path will be clear.
        >
        > (I have this urge to end that sentence with "little
        > grasshopper", but that's just my weirdness)
        >
        > I hope this helps.
        >
        >
        > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
        >
        > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > From: bordermeister@...
        > Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 14:32:21 +0000
        > Subject: [Distillers] Harry (and others)- what is your current malt
        whisky wash recipe
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Hi Harry, I started a while ago and used your simple
        whisky wash
        >
        > recipe with good results, strayed into the realm of clean vodka and
        >
        > have come back to true artisan spirits.
        >
        >
        >
        > I have made several 'Glenmorangie' clone runs - the latest needs its
        >
        > spirit run hopefully this weekend. The latest are getting better but
        >
        > are a fair bit of effort/cost compared to your (Harry's) original
        recipe.
        >
        >
        >
        > I now have a nice flavourful feints collection and am wondering if the
        >
        > effort of the 'Glenmorangie' clone recipe is worth the cost/effort.
        >
        >
        >
        > I realise this all comes down to personal preference, however I hold a
        >
        > great deal of respect for your hard earned knowledge, and was just
        >
        > curious to know how your current whisky wash is comprised - if you do
        >
        > not mind sharing your hard earned knowledge on this.
        >
        >
        >
        > Many Thanks
        >
        > Mark
        >
        >
        >
        > PS - I am a convert into trying to make a true quality homemade whisky
        >
        > after all of my forays.
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > _________________________________________________________________
        > Get Windows Live and get whatever you need, wherever you are. Start
        here.
        > http://www.windowslive.com/default.html?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_Home_082008
        >
      • rye_junkie1
        ... As Sherman has stated, Excellent post Z Bob. I read something the other day, I believe it was from Mathew Rowley, Where he stated he knew of a hobby
        Message 3 of 10 , Aug 8, 2008
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          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:

          > Mark,
          >
          > I'm sure not Harry, but I have some strong opinions about what
          > you ask, and perhaps some insight.
          >
          > First off, any grain whisk(e)y making is a lot of work, and *could*
          > be a pain in the ass if you are not either pure of heart or just
          > plain simple. By the time you mash multiple low-gravity grain
          > washes, maybe with backset, sparge, distill a bunch of those
          > washes to get enough low wines, and make cuts that exclude
          > a lot of your hard-earned ethanol, you have expended a
          > tremendous amount of effort. It seems downright wasteful.
          >
          > Commercial distillers have understood this for centuries, and
          > many have evolved methods for cheating, chiseling, and cutting
          > corners, so they can make more money per batch. Higher ABV
          > wash? Sure, hold your nose and do it. Bottle more heads and
          > tails? Why not; the Philistines can't tell the difference. (Reference
          > here to the great scene in Joseph Heller's "Catch22" where
          > the mess sargeant mashes laundry soap into the sweet potatoes,
          > and everyone loves it) And of course, if you've cut all those
          > corners, you're sure as *hell* not going to age that crap 30
          > years.
          >
          > On the other hand, as a home distiller, you're not necessarily
          > bound to making economical whisk(e)y, and you can decide
          > for yourself what kind of whisk(e)y you'll make. You can make
          > a hootch as nasty as you want, or you can aspire to ambrosia.
          > You may not quite achieve the latter, but the former's easy as
          > pie.
          >
          > For me, it just never made sense to aspire to swill.
          >
          > Last weekend, at a party of a very close friend, we were
          > sipping wine on the deck when the cry went up, "Andy's
          > bringing out the fruit jars!", and I knew it was my stuff that
          > I had given him over the years. In all those jars was a pint,
          > half full on oak chips, of a yellow plum brandy I'd made 3+
          > years earlier, that had somehow escaped the "death by a
          > thousand sips".
          >
          > Aged 3 years, I think that is the best stuff I've ever made,
          > and rivals the best brandy I've ever tasted (later batches of
          > yellow plum never quite stood up to that one). Having done
          > that with brandy, I'm sure I can do it with whisk(e)y also,
          > but I understand it'll take some effort.
          >
          > Anyway, before you start, make up your mind which you want,
          > economical whisk(e)y, simple whisk(e)y, efficient whisk(e)y,
          > or good whisk(e)y, and then your path will be clear.
          >
          > (I have this urge to end that sentence with "little
          > grasshopper", but that's just my weirdness)
          >
          > I hope this helps.
          >
          >
          > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller


          As Sherman has stated, Excellent post Z Bob. I read something the
          other day, I believe it was from Mathew Rowley, Where he stated he
          knew of a hobby distiller that would spend as much as 300.00 on making
          a gallon of Rye Whiskey. At first i thought How in the hell could you
          be spending that much, but if you have tried Making All grain mashes
          from Good quality products it starts to make sense and seem possible.
          Grain from my LHBS run about 1.50/pound. You need 10 pounds or so
          for a 5 gallon mash that will maybe yield 4 gallons of strained (that
          part aint easy at all) and cleared wash ready for the still. You get
          about a gallon of Low wines from that. I have an 8 gallon boiler and
          as you say to really make it worth it, and the cuts you have to make,
          that boiler needs to be full for the spirit run. Fermentation time
          alone for a run like that is close to 10 weeks. I have yet to be
          disciplined enough to do it. And we havent even started the aging
          process yet. One day I want to do a run of malt whiskey like this and
          age it but I just dont have the time and money to do it now. I
          continue to play with grains but I have to admit, Sugar washes,
          reflux columns and Scotch essences have made me Lazy and Happy. I
          have to say though, I feel at times I am doing the Hobby a great
          injustice by taking the easy way out.

          Mason
        • Harry
          ... Agreed. There s nowt to add. ZB said it all. Slainte! regard Harry
          Message 4 of 10 , Aug 8, 2008
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            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Sherman" <pintoshine@...> wrote:
            >
            > Well said ZB! Your common sense prohibits you from any political
            > position. I always appreciate a good dose of NON-BS
            >


            Agreed. There's nowt to add. ZB said it all. <G>


            Slainte!
            regard Harry
          • Harry
            ... recipe. ... .......Only your tastebuds & your desire for perfection can answer that. What price achievement? Maybe a comparison with the commercial
            Message 5 of 10 , Aug 8, 2008
            • 0 Attachment

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "bordermeister" <bordermeister@...> wrote:

              >
              > Hi Harry, I started a while ago and used your simple whisky wash
              > recipe with good results, strayed into the realm of clean vodka and
              > have come back to true artisan spirits.
              >
              > I have made several 'Glenmorangie' clone runs - the latest needs its
              > spirit run hopefully this weekend. The latest are getting better but
              > are a fair bit of effort/cost compared to your (Harry's) original recipe.
              >
              >
              > I now have a nice flavourful feints collection and am wondering if the
              > effort of the 'Glenmorangie' clone recipe is worth the cost/effort.


              .......Only your tastebuds & your desire for perfection can answer that.  What price achievement?  Maybe a comparison with the commercial offerings will be enlightening...

              Glenmorangie, Scotch Single Malt 12Yr ...$79.98 - SF Wine Trading Co.
              Glenmorangie 18year Malt Scotch 750ML$149.99 - Wally's Wine & Spirits
              Glenmorangie Single Malt Scotch Whisky$113.00 - 1-877-Spirits.com

               

              >
              > I realise this all comes down to personal preference, however I hold a
              > great deal of respect for your hard earned knowledge, and was just
              > curious to know how your current whisky wash is comprised - if you do
              > not mind sharing your hard earned knowledge on this.

               

              .........I haven't done much whisky lately.  Been concentrating on other things.  But if I was in need of a quick fix, then Dry Malt Extract, a good distillers whisky yeast (there's a few around) and Essence of Peatreek (search it here) would probably be as easy as it gets with acceptable results.  Mind you, Glenmorangie it ain't.  But it's better than some of the cheap commercial blends.


              >
              > Many Thanks
              > Mark
              >
              > PS - I am a convert into trying to make a true quality homemade whisky
              > after all of my forays.
              >

              ................Then accept the fact that there are really no shortcuts to achieving this.  18 yo whisky cannot be made any other way than top quality ingredients, technique and 18 years slumber in a Quercus Alba cask.  If this is your aim, start now, and make enough to sample some along the way (why else would you do it in the first place?).  Whatever remains of it you can leave as a memorable legacy for your relatives to imbibe at your wake.  <BG>

               

              Slainte!
              regards Harry

            • bordermeister
              Hi Robert, I don t have a problem with all of the work I put in for what I am making, what I was after was (if Harry or others are willing to share) his/their
              Message 6 of 10 , Aug 8, 2008
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                Hi Robert,
                I don't have a problem with all of the work I put in for what I am
                making, what I was after was (if Harry or others are willing to share)
                his/their current whisky wash recipe.

                I have followed all of Harry's earlier posts and learnt a damn huge
                amount from Harry and yourself. I have no intention of aspiring to
                swill, I am aspiring to make a nice malt whisky, I was just after some
                further insight from others.

                Harry used to make a malt extract based wash, I was interested in
                after doing the Glenmorangie clone article he had changed his recipe
                to that, kept his old, came up with a hybrid recipe etc...

                Apologies if anyone mistook my intent to make cheap swill - that is
                not my intent, the opposite in fact, but was just intereted in gaining
                the learnings from others (a sharing our collective hard earned
                knowledge).

                Cheers
                Mark



                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Mark,
                >
                > I'm sure not Harry, but I have some strong opinions about what
                > you ask, and perhaps some insight.
                >
                > First off, any grain whisk(e)y making is a lot of work, and *could*
                > be a pain in the ass if you are not either pure of heart or just
                > plain simple. By the time you mash multiple low-gravity grain
                > washes, maybe with backset, sparge, distill a bunch of those
                > washes to get enough low wines, and make cuts that exclude
                > a lot of your hard-earned ethanol, you have expended a
                > tremendous amount of effort. It seems downright wasteful.
                >
                > Commercial distillers have understood this for centuries, and
                > many have evolved methods for cheating, chiseling, and cutting
                > corners, so they can make more money per batch. Higher ABV
                > wash? Sure, hold your nose and do it. Bottle more heads and
                > tails? Why not; the Philistines can't tell the difference. (Reference
                > here to the great scene in Joseph Heller's "Catch22" where
                > the mess sargeant mashes laundry soap into the sweet potatoes,
                > and everyone loves it) And of course, if you've cut all those
                > corners, you're sure as *hell* not going to age that crap 30
                > years.
                >
                > On the other hand, as a home distiller, you're not necessarily
                > bound to making economical whisk(e)y, and you can decide
                > for yourself what kind of whisk(e)y you'll make. You can make
                > a hootch as nasty as you want, or you can aspire to ambrosia.
                > You may not quite achieve the latter, but the former's easy as
                > pie.
                >
                > For me, it just never made sense to aspire to swill.
                >
                > Last weekend, at a party of a very close friend, we were
                > sipping wine on the deck when the cry went up, "Andy's
                > bringing out the fruit jars!", and I knew it was my stuff that
                > I had given him over the years. In all those jars was a pint,
                > half full on oak chips, of a yellow plum brandy I'd made 3+
                > years earlier, that had somehow escaped the "death by a
                > thousand sips".
                >
                > Aged 3 years, I think that is the best stuff I've ever made,
                > and rivals the best brandy I've ever tasted (later batches of
                > yellow plum never quite stood up to that one). Having done
                > that with brandy, I'm sure I can do it with whisk(e)y also,
                > but I understand it'll take some effort.
                >
                > Anyway, before you start, make up your mind which you want,
                > economical whisk(e)y, simple whisk(e)y, efficient whisk(e)y,
                > or good whisk(e)y, and then your path will be clear.
                >
                > (I have this urge to end that sentence with "little
                > grasshopper", but that's just my weirdness)
                >
                > I hope this helps.
                >
                >
                > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                >
                > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                > From: bordermeister@...
                > Date: Fri, 8 Aug 2008 14:32:21 +0000
                > Subject: [Distillers] Harry (and others)- what is your current malt
                whisky wash recipe
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > Hi Harry, I started a while ago and used your simple
                whisky wash
                >
                > recipe with good results, strayed into the realm of clean vodka and
                >
                > have come back to true artisan spirits.
                >
                >
                >
                > I have made several 'Glenmorangie' clone runs - the latest needs its
                >
                > spirit run hopefully this weekend. The latest are getting better but
                >
                > are a fair bit of effort/cost compared to your (Harry's) original
                recipe.
                >
                >
                >
                > I now have a nice flavourful feints collection and am wondering if the
                >
                > effort of the 'Glenmorangie' clone recipe is worth the cost/effort.
                >
                >
                >
                > I realise this all comes down to personal preference, however I hold a
                >
                > great deal of respect for your hard earned knowledge, and was just
                >
                > curious to know how your current whisky wash is comprised - if you do
                >
                > not mind sharing your hard earned knowledge on this.
                >
                >
                >
                > Many Thanks
                >
                > Mark
                >
                >
                >
                > PS - I am a convert into trying to make a true quality homemade whisky
                >
                > after all of my forays.
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                >
                > _________________________________________________________________
                > Get Windows Live and get whatever you need, wherever you are. Start
                here.
                > http://www.windowslive.com/default.html?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_Home_082008
                >
              • duds2u
                Don t you hate it when you have a great reply ready to send and you hit the wrong key and lose it. Here goes on the second edition. I hpoe it is as erudite as
                Message 7 of 10 , Aug 10, 2008
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                  Don't you hate it when you have a great reply ready to send and you
                  hit the wrong key and lose it.
                  Here goes on the second edition. I hpoe it is as erudite as the first.

                  I too commence the whisky journey after Harry published
                  the "Glenmorangie" papers a couple of years ago. It's been a long and
                  interesting journey and I must admit I have enjoyed all of the
                  results, some more than others.

                  Along the way it became very apparent that using the best ingredients
                  and distilling skill are definitely not the only things required to
                  make good whisky. Admittedly my skills have developed along the way
                  but I still have a small amount of my original whisky left and it's
                  not bad (Aussie slang). My notes tell me it wasn't real good at the
                  time as new make but 2 years down the track it's "very interesting".

                  Where am I going with this, well from my experience and research time
                  and oak really do make the differnce. Certain authorites cite oak as
                  contributing up to 60% of the flavours of whisky.

                  Over the period I have been making whisky I have been experimenting
                  with differing oak chip blends (toasted and untoasted) and have also
                  used second use oak. It's been an intersting journey so far and my
                  personal thoughts on the matter are that less oak for longer is
                  better. It allows the complexities to develop without becoming tannic
                  or woody while still allowing the malt flavours to impart their
                  influence.

                  I firmly believe that you have to establish a goal in what you are
                  trying to achieve and to accomplish that you will need a couple of
                  bottles of "quality control" handy to keep the taste buds on track.
                  Just remember that you are not trying to copy someone elses product,
                  you're making your own whisky to a style.

                  Somewhere along the way yo are going to to do a taste test and
                  say "That's getting close!". Here's where you remember Harry's advice
                  and run for the notes to see what you did differently. You did take
                  notes didn't you. If you didn't and your memory's like mine "What day
                  was yesterday?" you have just lost 6 months of resarch.

                  That being said I'll go back to your original question of what
                  recipe are we using. For me I use a simple variation on Harry's LME
                  recipe.
                  2 kg peated malt barley (Mashed)
                  3 kg LME
                  2 kg Dextrose
                  Water to 25 litres
                  25 gm bakers yeast
                  sachet Safale S-04 yeast
                  (I have also used Prestige whisky yeast with AG with good results)

                  This always works out to a initial SG of about 1.080 and ferments to
                  about 1.004. I double ditill in a pot still using feints in the
                  spirit run. The spirit run wash I dilute to 27% ABV and make cuts
                  between about 77% and 62%ABV depending on the taste and nose.

                  I dilute the new make to 63% and do a three month stepped dilution,
                  10% per month, down to 43%.

                  I am currently using a 60/40 mix of toasted and untoasted oak chip at
                  rate of 5 gm per finished product and waiting at least 6 months.

                  Patience, Bloody Patience

                  This is my take and I'm happy with the product so far but as I said
                  earlier, it's journey that I'm enjoying. If anyone has some hints on
                  how to improve my method I'd be happy to hear them.

                  Cheers
                  Mal T.
                • Robert Hubble
                  Mal, Really, *really* a good post, and I m sure glad you went to the trouble to rewrite it. We have a lot in common with our whisky journey ( I like that
                  Message 8 of 10 , Aug 10, 2008
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                    Mal,

                    Really, *really* a good post, and I'm sure glad you went to the
                    trouble to rewrite it. We have a lot in common with our "whisky
                    journey" ( I like that description a lot). That said, you answered
                    the original question way better than I did, and I'm saving this
                    post for references.

                    I've got some more replies inline.

                    Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

                    ________________________________
                    >To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    >From: taylormc@...
                    >Date: Sun, 10 Aug 2008 07:00:22 +0000
                    >Subject: [Distillers] Re: Harry (and others)- what is your current malt whisky wash recipe


                    >Don't you hate it when you have a great reply ready to send and you

                    >hit the wrong key and lose it.

                    >Here goes on the second edition. I hpoe it is as erudite as the first.



                    >I too commence the whisky journey after Harry published

                    >the "Glenmorangie" papers a couple of years ago. It's been a long and

                    >interesting journey and I must admit I have enjoyed all of the

                    >results, some more than others.

                    *** All I can say is, "Yes!"



                    >Along the way it became very apparent that using the best ingredients

                    >and distilling skill are definitely not the only things required to

                    >make good whisky. Admittedly my skills have developed along the way

                    >but I still have a small amount of my original whisky left and it's

                    >not bad (Aussie slang). My notes tell me it wasn't real good at the

                    *** No translation needed for Americans. We use the expression also.

                    >time as new make but 2 years down the track it's "very interesting".



                    >Where am I going with this, well from my experience and research time

                    >and oak really do make the differnce. Certain authorites cite oak as

                    >contributing up to 60% of the flavours of whisky.

                    ***Whatever the percent is, it's a large one, and seriously important.



                    >Over the period I have been making whisky I have been experimenting

                    >with differing oak chip blends (toasted and untoasted) and have also

                    >used second use oak. It's been an intersting journey so far and my

                    >personal thoughts on the matter are that less oak for longer is

                    >better. It allows the complexities to develop without becoming tannic

                    >or woody while still allowing the malt flavours to impart their

                    >influence.

                    *** Last week I'd have told you the used oak was better, but then
                    I tasted that yellow plum brandy that had been sitting on
                    toasted American oak chips for 3 years. I just found a source
                    of chips that solves some of the expense; 10 pounds of
                    American toasted oak chips for about 27 USD. Looks like I'll
                    be doing more ship aging soon.



                    >I firmly believe that you have to establish a goal in what you are

                    >trying to achieve and to accomplish that you will need a couple of

                    >bottles of "quality control" handy to keep the taste buds on track.

                    *** Good luck in *that*! The death of a thousand sips.

                    >Just remember that you are not trying to copy someone elses product,

                    >you're making your own whisky to a style.

                    *** To me, this is the best part of your post, and the most important
                    to one on the "whisky journey" (I love that expression). With any
                    care at all, *all* of your whiskys will be better than *some* of the
                    commercial stuff, and it will just get better and your own favorite
                    whisky will evolve.


                    >Somewhere along the way yo are going to to do a taste test and

                    >say "That's getting close!". Here's where you remember Harry's advice

                    >and run for the notes to see what you did differently. You did take

                    >notes didn't you. If you didn't and your memory's like mine "What day

                    >was yesterday?" you have just lost 6 months of resarch.

                    *** I'm ashamed to admit I'm kinda sloppy in this respect. I keep
                    notes, but I can't always find them.



                    >That being said I'll go back to your original question of what

                    >recipe are we using. For me I use a simple variation on Harry's LME

                    >recipe.

                    >2 kg peated malt barley (Mashed)

                    >3 kg LME

                    >2 kg Dextrose

                    >Water to 25 litres

                    >25 gm bakers yeast

                    >sachet Safale S-04 yeast

                    >(I have also used Prestige whisky yeast with AG with good results)

                    *** Looks like a good recipe; I distill allgrain just because I brew
                    allgrain.



                    >This always works out to a initial SG of about 1.080 and ferments to

                    >about 1.004. I double ditill in a pot still using feints in the

                    >spirit run. The spirit run wash I dilute to 27% ABV and make cuts

                    >between about 77% and 62%ABV depending on the taste and nose.

                    *** We're also pretty close here.



                    >I dilute the new make to 63% and do a three month stepped dilution,

                    >10% per month, down to 43%.

                    *** Harry got me started doing this. It makes sense, and the end
                    results have sure been good. I'll keep on doing it.



                    >I am currently using a 60/40 mix of toasted and untoasted oak chip at

                    >rate of 5 gm per finished product and waiting at least 6 months.

                    *** Interesting. I've never tried blending them.



                    >Patience, Bloody Patience



                    >This is my take and I'm happy with the product so far but as I said

                    >earlier, it's journey that I'm enjoying. If anyone has some hints on

                    >how to improve my method I'd be happy to hear them.

                    ***Nothing to add, but you've given me some insight and
                    confirmation.



                    >Cheers

                    >Mal T.





































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                  • duds2u
                    ... other ... G Day Harry, Care to enlighten us on the distillers whisky yeasts that you have had good results with and maybe where you found them if that s
                    Message 9 of 10 , Aug 16, 2008
                    • 0 Attachment
                      > .........I haven't done much whisky lately. Been concentrating on
                      other
                      > things. But if I was in need of a quick fix, then Dry Malt Extract, a
                      > good distillers whisky yeast (there's a few around) and Essence of
                      > Peatreek (search it here) would probably be as easy as it gets with
                      > acceptable results. Mind you, Glenmorangie it ain't. But it's better
                      > than some of the cheap commercial blends.

                      >
                      > Slainte!
                      > regards Harry
                      >
                      G'Day Harry,
                      Care to enlighten us on the distillers whisky yeasts that you have had
                      good results with and maybe where you found them if that's kosher.

                      The only one that I have been able to acquire down here is the Prestige
                      whisky yeast with AG. Mostly I have stuck with bakers and a good ale
                      yeast. I have been getting good flavours but losing out on the yield.
                      The few times I used the WD yeast I found that I picked up between 2
                      and 5 SG points on the fermentation.
                      Cheers
                      Mal T.
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