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Re: "On the distillation of rum"

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  • waljaco
    Oops! Skim reading is dangerous! Thanks for the correction. Molasses from artisan sugar makers (panela, jaggery) I seem to recall is in the higher levels.
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 4, 2008
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      Oops! Skim reading is dangerous! Thanks for the correction.
      Molasses from artisan sugar makers (panela, jaggery) I seem to recall
      is in the higher levels. Modern blackstrap molasses can be as low as
      45% sugars due to greater efficiency.
      wal
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
      > >
      > > 'The Practical Sugar Planter' by Leonard Wray, 1848.
      > > Chapter 10,
      > > On The Distillation of Rum,
      > > pages 390-412.
      > >
      > > Contains interesting details of 19th century rum distillation.
      > > It is interesting to note that molasses then contained 75% sugars.
      > >
      > > http://tinyurl.com/5a6g9c
      > >
      > > wal
      > >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Further info, Wal. Page 398 says 65% (by parts or volume, not weight)
      > sugar average is the norm...
      >
      > <extract>
      > The
      > planter always reckons one gallon of proof rum for every
      > gallon of molasses that he uses. Now if we take common
      > average molasses as containing 65 parts sugar, 32 parts
      > water, and 3 parts organic matter and salts ; and suppose
      > that by careful fermentation and distillation, 33 parts (out of
      > 65) of absolute alcohol be obtained, we may then reckon
      > 33 lbs. of spirit, or about 4 gallons ; which is a return of
      > about 52/3 gallons of rum, 30 per cent. over proof, from
      > 100 lbs. of such molasses.‡ This agrees well with the
      > planter's calculation.
      > </extract>
      >
      > [Note: 30 overproof is 130 proof or 65% a/v]
      >
      >
      >
      > Slainte!
      > regards Harry
      >
    • anthony547357
      This account was most interesting, and ,as has been pointed out, the molasses strenth was 75% sugar. This was due to inefficiency, and not due to intention. I
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 5, 2008
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        This account was most interesting, and ,as has been pointed out, the
        molasses strenth was 75% sugar. This was due to inefficiency, and not
        due to intention.

        I was tempted to read the whole book (without buying it!). The book
        can be completely downloaded in PDF for later reference

        Tony


        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
        >
        > Oops! Skim reading is dangerous! Thanks for the correction.
        > Molasses from artisan sugar makers (panela, jaggery) I seem to
        recall
        > is in the higher levels. Modern blackstrap molasses can be as low as
        > 45% sugars due to greater efficiency.
        > wal
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > 'The Practical Sugar Planter' by Leonard Wray, 1848.
        > > > Chapter 10,
        > > > On The Distillation of Rum,
        > > > pages 390-412.
        > > >
        > > > Contains interesting details of 19th century rum distillation.
        > > > It is interesting to note that molasses then contained 75%
        sugars.
        > > >
        > > > http://tinyurl.com/5a6g9c
        > > >
        > > > wal
        > > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Further info, Wal. Page 398 says 65% (by parts or volume, not
        weight)
        > > sugar average is the norm...
        > >
        > > <extract>
        > > The
        > > planter always reckons one gallon of proof rum for every
        > > gallon of molasses that he uses. Now if we take common
        > > average molasses as containing 65 parts sugar, 32 parts
        > > water, and 3 parts organic matter and salts ; and suppose
        > > that by careful fermentation and distillation, 33 parts (out of
        > > 65) of absolute alcohol be obtained, we may then reckon
        > > 33 lbs. of spirit, or about 4 gallons ; which is a return of
        > > about 52/3 gallons of rum, 30 per cent. over proof, from
        > > 100 lbs. of such molasses.‡ This agrees well with the
        > > planter's calculation.
        > > </extract>
        > >
        > > [Note: 30 overproof is 130 proof or 65% a/v]
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > Slainte!
        > > regards Harry
        > >
        >
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