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"On the distillation of rum"

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  • waljaco
    The Practical Sugar Planter by Leonard Wray, 1848. Chapter 10, On The Distillation of Rum, pages 390-412. Contains interesting details of 19th century rum
    Message 1 of 5 , Aug 4, 2008
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      'The Practical Sugar Planter' by Leonard Wray, 1848.
      Chapter 10,
      On The Distillation of Rum,
      pages 390-412.

      Contains interesting details of 19th century rum distillation.
      It is interesting to note that molasses then contained 75% sugars.

      http://tinyurl.com/5a6g9c

      wal
    • Harry
      ... Au contraire, Wal. The text goes on at length to refute the 75% claim... Avequin gives the following analysis of molasses, resulting from canes
      Message 2 of 5 , Aug 4, 2008
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        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
        >
        > 'The Practical Sugar Planter' by Leonard Wray, 1848.
        > Chapter 10,
        > On The Distillation of Rum,
        > pages 390-412.
        >
        > Contains interesting details of 19th century rum distillation.
        > It is interesting to note that molasses then contained 75% sugars.
        >
        > http://tinyurl.com/5a6g9c
        >
        > wal
        >


        Au contraire, Wal.
        The text goes on at length to refute the 75% claim...

        <extract>
        Avequin gives the following analysis of
        molasses, resulting from canes grown in the rich alluvial
        soil of Louisiana, as comprised in 20 Ibs. : good crystalliz-
        able sugar, 15 lbs. ; salts and organic matter, 1 lb. ; and
        water, 4 lbs. He states the salts to be acetate of potash,
        chloride of potassium, sulphate of potash, biphosphate of
        lime, silica, and acetate of lime. The organic matter he
        states to be gum, or a substance much resembling it, constituting
        about one-ninth of the foreign matters contained in
        the whole.

        According to this analysis, he makes out the good crystal-
        lizable sugar to be 75 per cent. ; the saline matter to be
        4.35 per cent, and the organic matter only .65 per cent. of
        the whole. It appears to me that this analysis must be incorrect,
        to a degree quite absurd
        ; for he gives us all the
        sugar contained, as " good crystallizable sugar :" he can
        discover no uncrystallizable sugar, whilst he declares the
        presence of 4.35 per cent. of saline matter. It is difficult
        for us to reconcile this with what we know commonly
        happens : first, we must convince ourselves that the manufacture
        of the sugar had been perfected under the most
        favourable conditions, in order to prevent the formation of
        glucose or uncrystallizable sugar, by burning or concentration
        at a high temperature. Secondly, that so large a proportion
        of saline matter could exist in contact with sugar,
        without rendering a portion of it uncrystallizable. Thirdly,
        that 4 lbs. of cold water is capable of holding in solution
        15 lbs. of sugar ! ! When we can credit all this, we may
        then place some faith in such an analysis ; but until we can
        reconcile these improbabilities, we cannot but consider it as
        being an unaccountable error
        .
        </extract>

        [Note:  bold emphasis added for clarity]

         

        Slainte!
        regards Harry

      • Harry
        ... Further info, Wal. Page 398 says 65% (by parts or volume, not weight) sugar average is the norm... The planter always reckons one gallon of
        Message 3 of 5 , Aug 4, 2008
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          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
          >
          > 'The Practical Sugar Planter' by Leonard Wray, 1848.
          > Chapter 10,
          > On The Distillation of Rum,
          > pages 390-412.
          >
          > Contains interesting details of 19th century rum distillation.
          > It is interesting to note that molasses then contained 75% sugars.
          >
          > http://tinyurl.com/5a6g9c
          >
          > wal
          >

           

          Further info, Wal.  Page 398 says 65% (by parts or volume, not weight) sugar average is the norm...

          <extract>
          The
          planter always reckons one gallon of proof rum for every
          gallon of molasses that he uses. Now if we take common
          average molasses as containing 65 parts sugar, 32 parts
          water, and 3 parts organic matter and salts ; and suppose
          that by careful fermentation and distillation, 33 parts (out of
          65) of absolute alcohol be obtained, we may then reckon
          33 lbs. of spirit, or about 4 gallons ; which is a return of
          about 52/3 gallons of rum, 30 per cent. over proof, from
          100 lbs. of such molasses.‡   This agrees well with the
          planter's calculation. 
          </extract>

          [Note:  30 overproof is 130 proof or 65% a/v]

           

          Slainte!
          regards Harry

        • waljaco
          Oops! Skim reading is dangerous! Thanks for the correction. Molasses from artisan sugar makers (panela, jaggery) I seem to recall is in the higher levels.
          Message 4 of 5 , Aug 4, 2008
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            Oops! Skim reading is dangerous! Thanks for the correction.
            Molasses from artisan sugar makers (panela, jaggery) I seem to recall
            is in the higher levels. Modern blackstrap molasses can be as low as
            45% sugars due to greater efficiency.
            wal
            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
            >
            >
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
            > >
            > > 'The Practical Sugar Planter' by Leonard Wray, 1848.
            > > Chapter 10,
            > > On The Distillation of Rum,
            > > pages 390-412.
            > >
            > > Contains interesting details of 19th century rum distillation.
            > > It is interesting to note that molasses then contained 75% sugars.
            > >
            > > http://tinyurl.com/5a6g9c
            > >
            > > wal
            > >
            >
            >
            >
            >
            > Further info, Wal. Page 398 says 65% (by parts or volume, not weight)
            > sugar average is the norm...
            >
            > <extract>
            > The
            > planter always reckons one gallon of proof rum for every
            > gallon of molasses that he uses. Now if we take common
            > average molasses as containing 65 parts sugar, 32 parts
            > water, and 3 parts organic matter and salts ; and suppose
            > that by careful fermentation and distillation, 33 parts (out of
            > 65) of absolute alcohol be obtained, we may then reckon
            > 33 lbs. of spirit, or about 4 gallons ; which is a return of
            > about 52/3 gallons of rum, 30 per cent. over proof, from
            > 100 lbs. of such molasses.‡ This agrees well with the
            > planter's calculation.
            > </extract>
            >
            > [Note: 30 overproof is 130 proof or 65% a/v]
            >
            >
            >
            > Slainte!
            > regards Harry
            >
          • anthony547357
            This account was most interesting, and ,as has been pointed out, the molasses strenth was 75% sugar. This was due to inefficiency, and not due to intention. I
            Message 5 of 5 , Aug 5, 2008
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              This account was most interesting, and ,as has been pointed out, the
              molasses strenth was 75% sugar. This was due to inefficiency, and not
              due to intention.

              I was tempted to read the whole book (without buying it!). The book
              can be completely downloaded in PDF for later reference

              Tony


              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
              >
              > Oops! Skim reading is dangerous! Thanks for the correction.
              > Molasses from artisan sugar makers (panela, jaggery) I seem to
              recall
              > is in the higher levels. Modern blackstrap molasses can be as low as
              > 45% sugars due to greater efficiency.
              > wal
              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@> wrote:
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
              > > >
              > > > 'The Practical Sugar Planter' by Leonard Wray, 1848.
              > > > Chapter 10,
              > > > On The Distillation of Rum,
              > > > pages 390-412.
              > > >
              > > > Contains interesting details of 19th century rum distillation.
              > > > It is interesting to note that molasses then contained 75%
              sugars.
              > > >
              > > > http://tinyurl.com/5a6g9c
              > > >
              > > > wal
              > > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Further info, Wal. Page 398 says 65% (by parts or volume, not
              weight)
              > > sugar average is the norm...
              > >
              > > <extract>
              > > The
              > > planter always reckons one gallon of proof rum for every
              > > gallon of molasses that he uses. Now if we take common
              > > average molasses as containing 65 parts sugar, 32 parts
              > > water, and 3 parts organic matter and salts ; and suppose
              > > that by careful fermentation and distillation, 33 parts (out of
              > > 65) of absolute alcohol be obtained, we may then reckon
              > > 33 lbs. of spirit, or about 4 gallons ; which is a return of
              > > about 52/3 gallons of rum, 30 per cent. over proof, from
              > > 100 lbs. of such molasses.‡ This agrees well with the
              > > planter's calculation.
              > > </extract>
              > >
              > > [Note: 30 overproof is 130 proof or 65% a/v]
              > >
              > >
              > >
              > > Slainte!
              > > regards Harry
              > >
              >
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