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Whiskey from corn meal

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  • castillo.alex2008
    Hi everybody I plan to make whiskey from corn meal using enzymes to convert the starch into fermentable sugars. I don´t know however if having a powder is
    Message 1 of 6 , Jul 21, 2008
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      Hi everybody

      I plan to make whiskey from corn meal using enzymes to convert the
      starch into fermentable sugars. I don´t know however if having a
      powder is necessary to boil the corn meal to gelatinize the starch,
      since the enzyme may act over this finely divided solid. After
      fermentation is done do I have to rack/strain the liquid (i.e. through
      a piece of cloth) or boiling this trub will add good flavor to the
      hooch (I heat using a hotplate, not internal heating elements). Does
      this foam much when distilling (for not to put too much wort in the
      boiler)

      Thanks,

      Alex
    • p_mcerlean
      Hi Would Corn meal be the same as Maze meal? Reason for asking is I keep a sack of Maze meal for my carp fishing and am wondering if I can use it for
      Message 2 of 6 , Jul 22, 2008
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        Hi

        Would Corn meal be the same as Maze meal?

        Reason for asking is I keep a sack of Maze meal for my carp fishing
        and am wondering if I can use it for distilling. If so what type of
        whisky would it produce?

        Regards

        Pat


        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
        <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        > Hi everybody
        >
        > I plan to make whiskey from corn meal using enzymes to convert the
        > starch into fermentable sugars. I don´t know however if having a
        > powder is necessary to boil the corn meal to gelatinize the starch,
        > since the enzyme may act over this finely divided solid. After
        > fermentation is done do I have to rack/strain the liquid (i.e.
        through
        > a piece of cloth) or boiling this trub will add good flavor to the
        > hooch (I heat using a hotplate, not internal heating elements).
        Does
        > this foam much when distilling (for not to put too much wort in the
        > boiler)
        >
        > Thanks,
        >
        > Alex
        >
      • waljaco
        Heat bursts the starch cell walls releasing the starch. Fine grinding can achieve the same, and that is why yeast makes flour rise , utilizing the released
        Message 3 of 6 , Jul 22, 2008
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          Heat bursts the starch cell walls releasing the starch. Fine grinding
          can achieve the same, and that is why yeast makes flour 'rise',
          utilizing the released starch and enzymes in the flour.
          The Japanese steep crushed rice grains overnight (water:rice ratio of
          1.5:1), add citric acid (0.2%) and enzymes, followed by yeast in the
          production of shochu spirit.
          (See - 'Production of Shochu Spirit from Crushed Rice by Non-Cooking
          Fermentation')
          See also -
          http://www.freepatentsonline.com/4514496.html
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/39360

          (Crushed sweet potatoes contain conversion enzymes).

          wal
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
          <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
          >
          >
          > Hi everybody
          >
          > I plan to make whiskey from corn meal using enzymes to convert the
          > starch into fermentable sugars. I don´t know however if having a
          > powder is necessary to boil the corn meal to gelatinize the starch,
          > since the enzyme may act over this finely divided solid. After
          > fermentation is done do I have to rack/strain the liquid (i.e. through
          > a piece of cloth) or boiling this trub will add good flavor to the
          > hooch (I heat using a hotplate, not internal heating elements). Does
          > this foam much when distilling (for not to put too much wort in the
          > boiler)
          >
          > Thanks,
          >
          > Alex
          >
        • waljaco
          Maize = Indian corn which is at least 1/2 the mash bill of American whiskeys. Corn is/was a generic term for grains. wal
          Message 4 of 6 , Jul 22, 2008
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            Maize = 'Indian corn' which is at least 1/2 the mash bill of American
            whiskeys. Corn is/was a generic term for grains.
            wal

            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "p_mcerlean" <mail@...> wrote:
            >
            > Hi
            >
            > Would Corn meal be the same as Maze meal?
            >
            > Reason for asking is I keep a sack of Maze meal for my carp fishing
            > and am wondering if I can use it for distilling. If so what type of
            > whisky would it produce?
            >
            > Regards
            >
            > Pat
            >
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
            > <castillo.alex2008@> wrote:
            > >
            > >
            > > Hi everybody
            > >
            > > I plan to make whiskey from corn meal using enzymes to convert the
            > > starch into fermentable sugars. I don´t know however if having a
            > > powder is necessary to boil the corn meal to gelatinize the starch,
            > > since the enzyme may act over this finely divided solid. After
            > > fermentation is done do I have to rack/strain the liquid (i.e.
            > through
            > > a piece of cloth) or boiling this trub will add good flavor to the
            > > hooch (I heat using a hotplate, not internal heating elements).
            > Does
            > > this foam much when distilling (for not to put too much wort in the
            > > boiler)
            > >
            > > Thanks,
            > >
            > > Alex
            > >
            >
          • toddk63
            I hate to burst your bubble, but I don t think you will get significant conversion by relying solely on a cold enzyme treatment. Yes, I do boil my cornmeal
            Message 5 of 6 , Aug 7, 2008
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              I hate to burst your bubble, but I don't think you will get
              significant conversion by relying solely on a cold enzyme treatment.

              Yes, I do boil my cornmeal first, then I mash with barley and enzymes.
              Here is my condensed recipe below.
              ------------------
              -Heat 7.0 gal. treated brewing water to 170F
              -Add 14# cornmeal (160F), add 3 oz. barley (or 1.5 tsp amylase)
              -Rest 20 min. Keep below 160F
              -Simmer 15 min. (210F)
              -Add 4.25# flaked rye. Stir. (206F)
              -Let air cool (stirring) for 10 min. (195F)
              -Add 4.5 gal cool water. (153F)
              -Let cool to 153F. Add 3.25# barley (152F)
              -Mash 120 min between 152-142F
              -Chill below 85F, Add glucodiase (6 tabs Beano) or 2 tsp amylase
              -Ferment on the grain at 75-80F
              -Strain and pot still 2 times

              Yields 12 gal (SG 1058). Scoop out 11 gal of liquid off top. Fermented
              out to 1.000 SG. After
              straining 11 gal, 9 gallons of 7.8% abv to still.
              ---------------------------------
              Todd K.

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
              <castillo.alex2008@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              > Hi everybody
              >
              > I plan to make whiskey from corn meal using enzymes to convert the
              > starch into fermentable sugars. I don´t know however if having a
              > powder is necessary to boil the corn meal to gelatinize the starch,
              > since the enzyme may act over this finely divided solid. After
              > fermentation is done do I have to rack/strain the liquid (i.e. through
              > a piece of cloth) or boiling this trub will add good flavor to the
              > hooch (I heat using a hotplate, not internal heating elements). Does
              > this foam much when distilling (for not to put too much wort in the
              > boiler)
              >
              > Thanks,
              >
              > Alex
              >
            • waljaco
              Enzymes do have optimal operating temperatures - this effects the conversion rate. But they still convert during fermentation stage also. Boiling is used to
              Message 6 of 6 , Aug 8, 2008
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                Enzymes do have optimal operating temperatures - this effects the
                conversion rate. But they still convert during fermentation stage also.

                Boiling is used to rupture grain starch walls. This can be done
                mechanically also by fine grinding - this is why yeast acts on a cold
                flour slurry to make bread!

                The no-cooking method is now practiced widely to save energy costs
                although there is energy expended in fine grinding. Look it up.

                wal

                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "toddk63" <toddk63@...> wrote:
                >
                > I hate to burst your bubble, but I don't think you will get
                > significant conversion by relying solely on a cold enzyme treatment.
                >
                > Yes, I do boil my cornmeal first, then I mash with barley and enzymes.
                > Here is my condensed recipe below.
                > ------------------
                > -Heat 7.0 gal. treated brewing water to 170F
                > -Add 14# cornmeal (160F), add 3 oz. barley (or 1.5 tsp amylase)
                > -Rest 20 min. Keep below 160F
                > -Simmer 15 min. (210F)
                > -Add 4.25# flaked rye. Stir. (206F)
                > -Let air cool (stirring) for 10 min. (195F)
                > -Add 4.5 gal cool water. (153F)
                > -Let cool to 153F. Add 3.25# barley (152F)
                > -Mash 120 min between 152-142F
                > -Chill below 85F, Add glucodiase (6 tabs Beano) or 2 tsp amylase
                > -Ferment on the grain at 75-80F
                > -Strain and pot still 2 times
                >
                > Yields 12 gal (SG 1058). Scoop out 11 gal of liquid off top. Fermented
                > out to 1.000 SG. After
                > straining 11 gal, 9 gallons of 7.8% abv to still.
                > ---------------------------------
                > Todd K.
                >
                > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "castillo.alex2008"
                > <castillo.alex2008@> wrote:
                > >
                > >
                > > Hi everybody
                > >
                > > I plan to make whiskey from corn meal using enzymes to convert the
                > > starch into fermentable sugars. I don´t know however if having a
                > > powder is necessary to boil the corn meal to gelatinize the starch,
                > > since the enzyme may act over this finely divided solid. After
                > > fermentation is done do I have to rack/strain the liquid (i.e.
                through
                > > a piece of cloth) or boiling this trub will add good flavor to the
                > > hooch (I heat using a hotplate, not internal heating elements). Does
                > > this foam much when distilling (for not to put too much wort in the
                > > boiler)
                > >
                > > Thanks,
                > >
                > > Alex
                > >
                >
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