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Fwd: Re: [Distillers] Boiling your mash?

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  • walter jacobson
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    Message 1 of 2 , Feb 1, 2002
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      >From: Ups474@...
      >To: waljaco@...
      >Subject: Re: [Distillers] Boiling your mash?
      >Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 02:07:49 EST
      >
      >For beer manufacture, sanitation is not the only reason for the boil. You
      >are also trying to get proteins to coagulate, for amino acids to combine
      >(and
      >precipitate out) with tannins, and to get hop oils to isomerize (to become
      >water soluble and go into solution). Starch modification and sugar
      >carmelization are also something that occurs in the boil. Without a boil,
      >beer would be cloudy- period, nothing would be able to clear it up easily.
      >For mash/wash manufacture (i.e;something to be distilled), the boil is
      >unimportant; hops are not used, tannins, proteins, amino acids, etc will
      >all
      >be left behind in the spent mash, and the flavors they impart will be
      >modified through wood aging or charcoal filtration. So, yes boiling is
      >VERY
      >necessary.




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    • walter jacobson
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      Message 2 of 2 , Feb 3, 2002
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        >From: Ups474@...
        >To: waljaco@...
        >Subject: Re: [Distillers] Boiling your mash?
        >Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 16:47:27 EST
        >
        >One of the more important aspect of the boil (for beer) is the boiling off
        >of
        >dimethyl sulfide and related sulfur compounds. These are formed in the
        >mash
        >and in the boil- but if the boil is a good strong one, more is boiled off
        >than is produced. dimethyl sulfide (DMS among brewers) has a really nasty
        >wet-corn/sulfur smell/flavor. Enzymes do not have anything to do with the
        >isomerization of hop oils, the excretion of coagulated proteins, Ph drops
        >due
        >to calcium and phosphate reactions, or the Maillard reactions that produce
        >a
        >characteristic "malty" flavor to beer. ALL of these are acomplished in the
        >boil. Stopping enzymic function in the boil is also needed to prevent the
        >body of the beer from being degraded until it is thinner than water.
        >Boiling
        >does not cause any form of haze as long as it is done correctly- enzymic
        >additions are not needed. For a mash to be distilled, none of this
        >applies,
        >because, before it can begin to show any problems that not boiling the mash
        >would have- it is distilled.




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