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Re: [Distillers] Boiling your mash?

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  • king edward potatohead
    ... From: waljaco Many beer recipes include boiling the malt and hops. But is this necessary? I looked up info. on bacteria (the
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 29, 2002
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      ---- Begin Original Message ----
      From: "waljaco" <waljaco@...>

      Many beer recipes include boiling the malt and hops. But is this
      necessary? I looked up info. on bacteria (the nasties):
      Therefore the beer recipe for using water at 170F/75C so as not to
      destroy enzymes appears adequate also to discourage bacteria.
      ----------------------------------

      The long ( 90 min ) boil is essential as it converts the aromatics present in hops from a lipid
      soluble form to one that is water soluble ( a process called isomerisation ), without the boil,
      little of the bitterness imparted by the hops actualy makes it into the brew. Sugars present in
      the wort are also modified by the boil, some of the dextrins are broken up in smaller chains
      which affects eventual sweetness and mouthfeel of the beer as well as producing a certain
      amount that usable by the yeast at a very slow rate affecting the way the beer stores in the
      long term - I very rare prime my ales but rely on maturation of at least a couple of months in
      the cask for the yeast to build up a good head of CO2 and clarify, it's only really effective n
      ales over 5%ABV.

      Boiling also leads to precipitation of protein from the wort as it cools, is you're starting from
      extract this isn't so important but beginning with any proportion of real malt in the wort,
      improper boiling will lead either to a cloudy beer to start with or a beer that drops a chill haze
      on cooling.

      I really must get back into the ale production before the weather warms, the only thing I've
      made since the start of last summer is the pilsner that's been fermenting in the shed. I started
      it in November as soon as we had the first heavy frosts. It's a slow process but worth it - six
      weeks in the open tub before I could move it to cask and it's not going to be fully in condition
      until the end of March. If I want to bottle any of that, the bottles won't be ready until next year.

      Maybe it's time I went back to dong the 12% ales...
      Strounge






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    • waljaco
      Many beer recipes include boiling the malt and hops. But is this necessary? I looked up info. on bacteria (the nasties): Most bacteria grow best at body
      Message 2 of 3 , Jan 30, 2002
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        Many beer recipes include boiling the malt and hops. But is this
        necessary? I looked up info. on bacteria (the nasties):

        Most bacteria grow best at body temperature (98F/37C).
        Mesophilic (heat-loving) bacteria grow only at temps. of 50F/10C to
        110F/43C.
        Bacteria multiply rapidly between 40F/4.5C and 140F/60C.
        When reheating cooked food, reheat to 165F/74C.

        Therefore the beer recipe for using water at 170F/75C so as not to
        destroy enzymes appears adequate also to discourage bacteria.
        Cleanliness and sterilization are also requirements. Adding lots of
        active yeast to get a rapid fermentation is also obviously useful as
        it crowds out the bacteria ,and the CO2 blanket excludes them.

        Wal
      • walter jacobson
        Ups474, It appears to me that it is the enzymes that do the work you mention at a optimum temp. between 65-75C. By destroying them by boiling (100C) often you
        Message 3 of 3 , Feb 1, 2002
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          Ups474,
          It appears to me that it is the enzymes that do the work you mention at a
          optimum temp. between 65-75C. By destroying them by boiling (100C) often you
          need to add enzymes later to clear haze. Why 212F/100C? What is inherently
          critical with this temperature? How was it arrived at? Maybe 75C does all
          the things that 100C does! I am just trying to find a rationale to the
          process. No reason to overcook.
          I must admit a rapid cooling of the wort after about 2 hours (75C goes down
          to 65C and then rapidly cool to 24C) by either a chiller or a cold bath is
          useful to prevent contamination by getting a rapid fermentation going.
          I am intrigued that's all.
          Wal

          >From: Ups474@...
          >To: waljaco@...
          >Subject: Re: [Distillers] Boiling your mash?
          >Date: Fri, 1 Feb 2002 02:07:49 EST
          >
          >For beer manufacture, sanitation is not the only reason for the boil. You
          >are also trying to get proteins to coagulate, for amino acids to combine
          >(and
          >precipitate out) with tannins, and to get hop oils to isomerize (to become
          >water soluble and go into solution). Starch modification and sugar
          >carmelization are also something that occurs in the boil. Without a boil,
          >beer would be cloudy- period, nothing would be able to clear it up easily.
          >For mash/wash manufacture (i.e;something to be distilled), the boil is
          >unimportant; hops are not used, tannins, proteins, amino acids, etc will
          >all
          >be left behind in the spent mash, and the flavors they impart will be
          >modified through wood aging or charcoal filtration. So, yes boiling is
          >VERY
          >necessary.






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