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Dram buidhe/Drambuie - The Yellow Drink

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  • waljaco
    See msg. 21793 for background. I came across a Scuba recipe in The Art of French Cookery by A.B. Beauvilliers, London, 1827, that could be the basis of the
    Message 1 of 10 , May 8, 2008
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      See msg. 21793 for background.

      I came across a 'Scuba' recipe in 'The Art of French Cookery' by A.B.
      Beauvilliers, London, 1827, that could be the basis of the commercial
      Drambuie. 'Scuba' is a French corruption of the Scots Gaelic 'usque
      baugh/uisge beatha' which we know as whisky. Early whiskies (for the
      gentry) were actually highly flavored cordials. I have scaled it down
      to 4 litres.

      Scuba/Escubac/Usquebac

      4 litres whisky (unaged, 30%abv)
      zest of 1 lemon
      20g coriander seeds (crushed)
      2.5 g cinnamon (crushed)
      1.25 g mace (crushed)
      4 cloves (crushed)
      10 g crushed bitter almonds (replace with apricot kernels)
      2 cups sugar (or heather honey)
      saffron (infused in a little of the whisky)

      Macerate for 1 week and distill. Color yellow with saffron and sweeten
      with 1/2 cup sugar/litre.

      wal
      You could use a quarter of the amount and steep in 1 litre of aged
      whisky and then strain. Color yellow with saffron and sweeten with
      floral honey. Possibly the bitter almonds could be omited.
    • Zapata Vive
      Drambuie tasts a lot like licorice to me, and I don t see anything in that list to contribute that flavor. Anise maybe? ... From: waljaco To:
      Message 2 of 10 , May 9, 2008
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        Drambuie tasts a lot like licorice to me, and I don't see anything in that list to contribute that flavor.  Anise maybe?
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        From: waljaco
        Sent: Friday, May 09, 2008 1:29 AM
        Subject: [Distillers] Dram buidhe/Drambuie - The Yellow Drink

        See msg. 21793 for background.

        I came across a 'Scuba' recipe in 'The Art of French Cookery' by A.B.
        Beauvilliers, London, 1827, that could be the basis of the commercial
        Drambuie. 'Scuba' is a French corruption of the Scots Gaelic 'usque
        baugh/uisge beatha' which we know as whisky. Early whiskies (for the
        gentry) were actually highly flavored cordials. I have scaled it down
        to 4 litres.

        Scuba/Escubac/ Usquebac

        4 litres whisky (unaged, 30%abv)
        zest of 1 lemon
        20g coriander seeds (crushed)
        2.5 g cinnamon (crushed)
        1.25 g mace (crushed)
        4 cloves (crushed)
        10 g crushed bitter almonds (replace with apricot kernels)
        2 cups sugar (or heather honey)
        saffron (infused in a little of the whisky)

        Macerate for 1 week and distill. Color yellow with saffron and sweeten
        with 1/2 cup sugar/litre.

        wal
        You could use a quarter of the amount and steep in 1 litre of aged
        whisky and then strain. Color yellow with saffron and sweeten with
        floral honey. Possibly the bitter almonds could be omited.

      • waljaco
        Liquorice? Having drank a pure sliced liquorice root infusion I cannot agree. Aniseed is different to liquorice. But many of the old usquebaugh recipes do
        Message 3 of 10 , May 10, 2008
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          Liquorice? Having drank a pure sliced liquorice root infusion I cannot
          agree. Aniseed is different to liquorice. But many of the old
          usquebaugh recipes do contain liquorice root and even juniper berries
          - see Recipes in Files.
          wal

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Zapata Vive" <zapatavive@...> wrote:
          >
          > Drambuie tasts a lot like licorice to me, and I don't see anything
          in that list to contribute that flavor. Anise maybe?
          >
          > ----- Original Message -----
          > From: waljaco
          > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          > Sent: Friday, May 09, 2008 1:29 AM
          > Subject: [Distillers] Dram buidhe/Drambuie - The Yellow Drink
          >
          >
          > See msg. 21793 for background.
          >
          > I came across a 'Scuba' recipe in 'The Art of French Cookery' by A.B.
          > Beauvilliers, London, 1827, that could be the basis of the commercial
          > Drambuie. 'Scuba' is a French corruption of the Scots Gaelic 'usque
          > baugh/uisge beatha' which we know as whisky. Early whiskies (for the
          > gentry) were actually highly flavored cordials. I have scaled it down
          > to 4 litres.
          >
          > Scuba/Escubac/Usquebac
          >
          > 4 litres whisky (unaged, 30%abv)
          > zest of 1 lemon
          > 20g coriander seeds (crushed)
          > 2.5 g cinnamon (crushed)
          > 1.25 g mace (crushed)
          > 4 cloves (crushed)
          > 10 g crushed bitter almonds (replace with apricot kernels)
          > 2 cups sugar (or heather honey)
          > saffron (infused in a little of the whisky)
          >
          > Macerate for 1 week and distill. Color yellow with saffron and sweeten
          > with 1/2 cup sugar/litre.
          >
          > wal
          > You could use a quarter of the amount and steep in 1 litre of aged
          > whisky and then strain. Color yellow with saffron and sweeten with
          > floral honey. Possibly the bitter almonds could be omited.
          >
        • Harry
          ... Try this one... From The Domestic Encyclopaedia Vol4 , by A. F. M.
          Message 4 of 10 , May 10, 2008
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            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
            >
            > Liquorice? Having drank a pure sliced liquorice root infusion I cannot
            > agree. Aniseed is different to liquorice. But many of the old
            > usquebaugh recipes do contain liquorice root and even juniper berries
            > - see Recipes in Files.
            > wal

            Try this one...

            From "The Domestic Encyclopaedia Vol4", by A. F. M. Willich, 1802. Amazon: The Domestic Encyclopaedia.

            Usquebaugh

            Usquebaugh, a strong, compound, spirituous liquor, which is prepared in the following manner :

            Take of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmegs, each 2 oz.; of caraway, anise, and coriander-seeds, each 4 oz.; and half a pound ofliquorice-root, cut in slices. Let these ingredients be bruised, and distilled with11 gallons of proof-spirit, and 2 gallons of water, till the faints begin to rise. When the liquor is about to run, 2 oz. of British saffron, tied in a linen bag, should be fixed to the extremity of the worm, so that the spirit may filtre through, and extract all the virtues of the saffron. When the distillation is completed, the whole should be sweetened with a sufficient quantity of double-refined sugar, and decanted for use.

            Usquebaugh is chiefly employed as a cordial, and may occasionally be drunk with advantage, by persons who have undergone great bodily fatigue ; but, as the possession of such luscious beverage is apt to introduce detestable habits, we conceive, that diluted rum, or other simple spirit, would afford a proper substitute for this expensive compound.

             

            Slainte!
            regards Harry

          • waljaco
            There is an observation that Drambuie contains lemon zest. Glayva which came later has a hint of orange. wal ...
            Message 5 of 10 , May 10, 2008
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              There is an observation that Drambuie contains lemon zest. Glayva
              which came later has a hint of orange.
              wal

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
              >
              >
              >
              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
              > >
              > > Liquorice? Having drank a pure sliced liquorice root infusion I cannot
              > > agree. Aniseed is different to liquorice. But many of the old
              > > usquebaugh recipes do contain liquorice root and even juniper berries
              > > - see Recipes in Files.
              > > wal
              >
              >
              > Try this one...
              >
              > From "The Domestic Encyclopaedia Vol4
              >
              <http://chestofbooks.com/reference/The-Domestic-Encyclopaedia-Vol4/index\
              > .html> ", by A. F. M. Willich, 1802. Amazon: The Domestic Encyclopaedia
              >
              <http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0008BPZCE?ie=UTF8&tag=theultimatlearn\
              > a&link_code=as3&camp=211189&creative=373489&creativeASIN=B0008BPZCE> .
              > Usquebaugh
              > Usquebaugh, a strong, compound, spirituous liquor, which is prepared in
              > the following manner :
              >
              > Take of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmegs, each 2 oz.; of caraway, anise,
              > and coriander-seeds, each 4 oz.; and half a pound ofliquorice-root, cut
              > in slices. Let these ingredients be bruised, and distilled with11
              > gallons of proof-spirit, and 2 gallons of water, till the faints begin
              > to rise. When the liquor is about to run, 2 oz. of British saffron, tied
              > in a linen bag, should be fixed to the extremity of the worm, so that
              > the spirit may filtre through, and extract all the virtues of the
              > saffron. When the distillation is completed, the whole should be
              > sweetened with a sufficient quantity of double-refined sugar, and
              > decanted for use.
              >
              > Usquebaugh is chiefly employed as a cordial, and may occasionally be
              > drunk with advantage, by persons who have undergone great bodily fatigue
              > ; but, as the possession of such luscious beverage is apt to introduce
              > detestable habits, we conceive, that diluted rum, or other simple
              > spirit, would afford a proper substitute for this expensive compound.
              >
              >
              >
              > Slainte!
              > regards Harry
              >
            • subsonic40grain
              ...such luscious beverage is apt to introduce detestable habits Mmmmm! Such as? Maybe we should all make some and see what happens! Just clearing up the
              Message 6 of 10 , May 10, 2008
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                '...such luscious beverage is apt to introduce detestable habits'

                Mmmmm! Such as? Maybe we should all make some and see what happens!

                Just clearing up the aftermath of a big Texas BarB, the Limoncello was
                the best digestiff to finish with :-*) Subsonic.
              • waljaco
                True. I have nt made it myself but the imitation recipes on the internet rely on herbs such as coriander and angelica root and honey. wal
                Message 7 of 10 , May 10, 2008
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                  True. I have'nt made it myself but the imitation recipes on the
                  internet rely on herbs such as coriander and angelica root and honey.
                  wal
                  --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "subsonic40grain"
                  <subsonic40grain@...> wrote:
                  >
                  > '...such luscious beverage is apt to introduce detestable habits'
                  >
                  > Mmmmm! Such as? Maybe we should all make some and see what happens!
                  >
                  > Just clearing up the aftermath of a big Texas BarB, the Limoncello was
                  > the best digestiff to finish with :-*) Subsonic.
                  >
                • Arsene Lupin
                  From my experience you wont extract cinnamon & aniseed this way. Anethol (aniseed), is distilled with water (you ll only get it at the very end of tails when
                  Message 8 of 10 , May 11, 2008
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                    From my experience you wont extract cinnamon & aniseed this way.
                    Anethol (aniseed), is distilled with water (you'll only get it at the
                    very end of tails when you are distilling water)

                    Cinnamon : I could never extract anything by distilling with alcohol,
                    perhaps water would be better

                    I never tried distilling licorice, glycirinic acid (the licorice
                    flavour) being an acid you'll only have a chance to distill it if you
                    are at lower pHs. The japanese patent will tell you how to properly
                    extract licorice. God bless google !

                    Cheers
                    Manu

                    --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > Liquorice? Having drank a pure sliced liquorice root infusion I cannot
                    > > agree. Aniseed is different to liquorice. But many of the old
                    > > usquebaugh recipes do contain liquorice root and even juniper berries
                    > > - see Recipes in Files.
                    > > wal
                    >
                    >
                    > Try this one...
                    >
                    > From "The Domestic Encyclopaedia Vol4
                    >
                    <http://chestofbooks.com/reference/The-Domestic-Encyclopaedia-Vol4/index\
                    > .html> ", by A. F. M. Willich, 1802. Amazon: The Domestic Encyclopaedia
                    >
                    <http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0008BPZCE?ie=UTF8&tag=theultimatlearn\
                    > a&link_code=as3&camp=211189&creative=373489&creativeASIN=B0008BPZCE> .
                    > Usquebaugh
                    > Usquebaugh, a strong, compound, spirituous liquor, which is prepared in
                    > the following manner :
                    >
                    > Take of cloves, cinnamon, and nutmegs, each 2 oz.; of caraway, anise,
                    > and coriander-seeds, each 4 oz.; and half a pound ofliquorice-root, cut
                    > in slices. Let these ingredients be bruised, and distilled with11
                    > gallons of proof-spirit, and 2 gallons of water, till the faints begin
                    > to rise. When the liquor is about to run, 2 oz. of British saffron, tied
                    > in a linen bag, should be fixed to the extremity of the worm, so that
                    > the spirit may filtre through, and extract all the virtues of the
                    > saffron. When the distillation is completed, the whole should be
                    > sweetened with a sufficient quantity of double-refined sugar, and
                    > decanted for use.
                    >
                    > Usquebaugh is chiefly employed as a cordial, and may occasionally be
                    > drunk with advantage, by persons who have undergone great bodily fatigue
                    > ; but, as the possession of such luscious beverage is apt to introduce
                    > detestable habits, we conceive, that diluted rum, or other simple
                    > spirit, would afford a proper substitute for this expensive compound.
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > Slainte!
                    > regards Harry
                    >
                  • Robert Hubble
                    Manu, I make a gin extract in a little coffeepot still like the one in Tony s site, and cinnamon is one of the ingredients in my gin recipe (I macerate the
                    Message 9 of 10 , May 12, 2008
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                      Manu,

                      I make a gin extract in a little coffeepot still like the one in
                      Tony's site, and cinnamon is one of the ingredients in my
                      gin recipe (I macerate the botanicals in about 50% abv).
                      It's really interesting to taste the output as it
                      progresses through the boiling points of the flavoring
                      components. It starts off with serious juniper flavor,
                      eases through the rest, and ends up with a long
                      cinnamon note tapering off into the tails.

                      The upshot of this is that while I'm not sure what
                      percentage of the cinnamon components come
                      across in a water-ethanol extraction, I do get quite a
                      bit of the cinnamon flavor that way.

                      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller



                      ________________________________

                      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      From: ragnagna75012@...
                      Date: Sun, 11 May 2008 13:33:20 +0000
                      Subject: [Distillers] Re: Dram buidhe/Drambuie - The Yellow Drink

                      From my experience you wont extract cinnamon & aniseed this way.
                      Anethol (aniseed), is distilled with water (you'll only get it at the
                      very end of tails when you are distilling water)

                      Cinnamon : I could never extract anything by distilling with alcohol,
                      perhaps water would be better

                      I never tried distilling licorice, glycirinic acid (the licorice
                      flavour) being an acid you'll only have a chance to distill it if you
                      are at lower pHs. The japanese patent will tell you how to properly
                      extract licorice. God bless google !

                      Cheers
                      Manu

                      -----snip-----
                      _________________________________________________________________
                      With Windows Live for mobile, your contacts travel with you.
                      http://www.windowslive.com/mobile/overview.html?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_Refresh_mobile_052008
                    • waljaco
                      All the classic distillation books from 1750 say so too! Otherwise you would not have your Cinnamon Schnapps, Curacao and Raki etc. My view is that Drambuie
                      Message 10 of 10 , May 12, 2008
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                        All the classic distillation books from 1750 say so too! Otherwise
                        you would not have your Cinnamon Schnapps, Curacao and Raki etc.
                        My view is that Drambuie was influenced by published recipes of the time.
                        wal
                        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
                        >
                        >
                        > Manu,
                        >
                        > I make a gin extract in a little coffeepot still like the one in
                        > Tony's site, and cinnamon is one of the ingredients in my
                        > gin recipe (I macerate the botanicals in about 50% abv).
                        > It's really interesting to taste the output as it
                        > progresses through the boiling points of the flavoring
                        > components. It starts off with serious juniper flavor,
                        > eases through the rest, and ends up with a long
                        > cinnamon note tapering off into the tails.
                        >
                        > The upshot of this is that while I'm not sure what
                        > percentage of the cinnamon components come
                        > across in a water-ethanol extraction, I do get quite a
                        > bit of the cinnamon flavor that way.
                        >
                        > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > ________________________________
                        >
                        > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        > From: ragnagna75012@...
                        > Date: Sun, 11 May 2008 13:33:20 +0000
                        > Subject: [Distillers] Re: Dram buidhe/Drambuie - The Yellow Drink
                        >
                        > From my experience you wont extract cinnamon & aniseed this way.
                        > Anethol (aniseed), is distilled with water (you'll only get it at the
                        > very end of tails when you are distilling water)
                        >
                        > Cinnamon : I could never extract anything by distilling with alcohol,
                        > perhaps water would be better
                        >
                        > I never tried distilling licorice, glycirinic acid (the licorice
                        > flavour) being an acid you'll only have a chance to distill it if you
                        > are at lower pHs. The japanese patent will tell you how to properly
                        > extract licorice. God bless google !
                        >
                        > Cheers
                        > Manu
                        >
                        > -----snip-----
                        > _________________________________________________________________
                        > With Windows Live for mobile, your contacts travel with you.
                        >
                        http://www.windowslive.com/mobile/overview.html?ocid=TXT_TAGLM_WL_Refresh_mobile_052008
                        >
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