Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: [Distillers] Re: About gin

Expand Messages
  • Kegs
    I use a fillet knife as well. Cut the orange/lemon into quarters and just fillet off the pith as Sherman describes. You get the most bang for buck without
    Message 1 of 41 , May 1, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      I use a fillet knife as well.
      Cut the orange/lemon into quarters and just fillet off the pith as
      Sherman describes.
      You get the most bang for buck without waste.

      Kevin (Thirsty Traveler) is a knowledgeable guy, earlier this year
      when he was in Sydney I had a chance to spend a few hours with him and
      talk shop.


      Ian...

      On Thu, May 1, 2008 at 9:39 AM, Sherman
      <pintoshine@...> wrote:
      >
      > I saw a really nice Thirsty Traveler where they were making gin. The
      > orange and lemon peels they were using were sort of filleted. The were
      > using the zest but it had a minute amount of white on the back side.
      > I fillet my orange peels by removing the pith from the back side with
      > a fillet knife down to the "bubbles" It is hard to describe. But it
      > effectively removes the bitter part which is next to the membrane
      > containing the pulp. I learned this making candied orange peel and
      > candied grapefruit. Drying afterward doesn't change the flavor much
      > when using 95% to extract the orange oil. I generally just put it
      > fresh in a blender, add 95% and blend. This makes a fast extract that
      > is really nice tasting. It extracts so much oil it will louche.
    • phenol90
      Hey Justin, Did you ever get around to doing anything with that hot water copper tank of yours? I m thinking about a similar project. Cheers, J.
      Message 41 of 41 , Aug 6, 2009
      • 0 Attachment
        Hey Justin,

        Did you ever get around to doing anything with that hot water copper tank of yours?

        I'm thinking about a similar project.

        Cheers,

        J.

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, justin webster <mail@...> wrote:
        >
        > thanks guys,
        > sounds like it's worth a shot and a bit of fun too.
        > I already have the gear to cut it open, strip it back and re-solder
        > so it's probably do-able.
        > I'll let you know what I find (when I get round to it).
        > cheers,
        > justin
        >
        > On 2/05/2008, at 10:01 PM, jamesonbeam1 wrote:
        >
        > > Good Point Billy,
        > >
        > > But try almost 50 years old (this is 2008 right? :):).
        > >
        > > Vino es Veritas,
        > > Jim.
        > >
        > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "billy.turf" <billy.turf@>
        > > wrote:
        > > >
        > > > I wonder, If lead is sooo good a leaching, then wouldn't it already
        > > > be pretty much all gone out of a 30yr old water heater? Everything
        > > > you would add would be without lead of course, but just how much
        > > > solder would be used in such an old heater? The amount of
        > > leaching is
        > > > going to be proportional to the amount of time that it sits in there
        > > > too... that's not gonna be a long time.
        > > ____snip____
        > >
        > >
        > >
        >
      Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.