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Re: [Distillers] maximizing my new yeast

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  • Trid
    ... If it were me, I d try to get a running culture going, up to, and possibly including making a few slants for future propagation. I ll add right away that
    Message 1 of 14 , Apr 30, 2008
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      --- justin webster <mail@...> wrote:

      > I have a small amount of yeast imported from the US which cost me
      > more than I can afford to spend per wash.
      > I'm trying to figure out how to get the most out of my investment
      >
      > now, I could propagate a master culture and then with each batch go
      > thru the laborious process of creating a mini-starter then a larger
      > starter then finally pitching.
      >
      > my other option is to rehydrate and pitch the yeast as recommended
      > and then reuse all the yeast slurry 3 or 4 times before starting
      > again with the dry yeast.
      > in my case this would probably involve storing the slurry in the
      > fridge for a week or so.
      >
      > is there any advantage to doing it one way or the other?
      > the yeast is Danstil EDV493 fermenting a light molasses/sugar wort.
      > sorry if this is a bit 'newbie',

      If it were me, I'd try to get a running culture going, up to, and possibly
      including making a few slants for future propagation. I'll add right away that
      I'm a novice when it comes to yeast farming, but this is my best SWAG: [1]
      Like making a starter, but more intense, I'd get perhaps half of the yeast and
      pitch it in a 2 gallon starter with the wash you're looking to use. Then, from
      moment one, bubble air [2](or better, oxygen) through it continuously.
      Combined with the nutrients and food from the starter wort plus the perpetual
      source of oxygen, the yeast does nothing but multiply like mad. From there,
      I'd decant portions to pitch in my wort slated for the still and replenish with
      a like volume of sterile wort for the continued propagation of the yeast. As
      far as how long to let it go before decanting a quantity for actual
      fermentation...I'd be guessing on that one, but maybe 2, perhaps as much as 4
      days after initial pitch?
      You could always try this method with a readily available strain to see if it
      works before attempting it with the harder to get strain.

      Trid
      -another project I'm intending on embarking upon in the near future

      [1] SWAG - Scientific Wild Ass Guess
      [2] if using air instead of O2, be sure it's filtered very well
    • jamesonbeam1
      Hey Justin, Along with Harry s disertation on Whiskey yeast culturing, there is a very good disertation by MB Raines-Casselman, Ph.D. on Yeast Propagation and
      Message 2 of 14 , May 1 2:19 AM
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        Hey Justin,

        Along with Harry's disertation on Whiskey yeast culturing, there is a
        very good disertation by MB Raines-Casselman, Ph.D. on
        Yeast Propagation and Maintenance: Principles and Practices at:
        http://maltosefalcons.com/tech/MB_Raines_Guide_to_Yeast_Culturing.php

        This describes fully the various methods of propagation and re-
        harvesting yeast. I've been re-harvesting my EC-1118 yeast for many
        genrations now, using the wort / sugar method and refrigerating it.

        Vino es Veritas,
        Jim.







        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, justin webster <mail@...> wrote:

        I have a small amount of yeast imported from the US which cost me
        more than I can afford to spend per wash.
        I'm trying to figure out how to get the most out of my investment

        now, I could propagate a master culture and then with each batch go
        thru the laborious process of creating a mini-starter then a larger
        starter then finally pitching.

        my other option is to rehydrate and pitch the yeast as recommended
        and then reuse all the yeast slurry 3 or 4 times before starting
        again with the dry yeast.
        in my case this would probably involve storing the slurry in the
        fridge for a week or so.

        is there any advantage to doing it one way or the other?

        the yeast is Danstil EDV493 fermenting a light molasses/sugar wort.
        sorry if this is a bit 'newbie',
        cheers,
        justin
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