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FW: about using potatoes as feedstock

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  • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
    An email from a Finnish friend re using potatoes .... ... From: Teemu Sorry for my lousy english. Making vodka from potatoes Two good reasons for using
    Message 1 of 3 , Jan 21, 2002
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      An email from a Finnish friend re using potatoes ....

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Teemu

      Sorry for my lousy english.

      Making vodka from potatoes

      Two good reasons for using potatoes:

      1. Traditionally vodka is made of grain or potatoes to achieve the smooth &
      soft aroma; witch is typical to commercial European vodkas.
      2. In Finland 1kg of sugar costs about 1,9e, 25kg sack of (feed) potatoes
      from local Agri-Market costs 2e...


      The recipe, witch may lead to prosecute:

      20-25kg potatoes
      1kg of barley, malted and gristed
      50-100g of good (Turbo/Prestige/Partymann...) yeast (hydrated)
      Some fresh water

      Equipment needed:
      30litre beer fermenter
      A large (30-50litre) kettle (I use a milk can...)
      A meat grinder (for mashing the potatoes)
      A large scoop or a "wash paddle"
      A hotplate with a thermostat

      1. Clean all the dirt from the potatoes, (don't bother to peel them)
      2. Put the potatoes in to kettle and cover them with water, bring to boil.
      Cook until the first ones break down -this should take about 1hr. In
      meanwhile hydrate the yeast and mix 1kg malt and 2litre of water (if you use
      homemade malt, don't dry them -it weakens the mysterious "amylathic power").
      3. Pour the water out from the kettle (use mittens, be careful). Mash the
      potatoes in the grinder while they are hot. (If done right the mash looks
      like thick porridge.)
      4. Put the mash to kettle (and adjust the hotplates temperature to 60C).
      Add 1/3 of the hydrated malt to the kettle and stir well. Wait until the
      temperature has dropt to 65C. Add the rest of the hydrated malt and stir in
      well. Let sit there for about 2 hours. Stir often. (If done right the wash
      should have turned flowing.)
      5. Turn the hotplate off. Put the kettle in somewhere cool. When the
      temperature has dropped down to 25C pour to fermenter and add yeast (no
      nutrients needed). First carbon dioxide bubbles should rise after couple of
      hours; main fermenting takes about two days, ready for distilling in four
      days -if you have done everything as written. Result will be 7-12vol%,
      depending the starch level of potatoes.

      This is how I do it. There are many different ways too-but there are always
      four steps.
      1. Softening the cellular walls.
      2. Mashing the potatoes.
      In industrial scale steps one and two are usually done by using the
      HENZE-kettle, witch is basically a direct-steam heated pressure cooker
      (pressure is up to 8atm and the cooking time about 40min).
      3. Converting the starch to maltose.
      4. Fermenting.
      Notice that there are only those 2l of water added to mash, no more are
      required because the potatoes contains ¾ of water.

      P.S.

      If the wash is done right you should be able to distill it with a still that
      has an inner heating element -I have a 2kW inner (silver plated) heating
      element in mine.
    • abbababbaccc
      That sounds more like it, one for the archives I think (mental note, check the price of feed potatoes :) Slainte, Riku
      Message 2 of 3 , Apr 30 2:23 AM
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        That sounds more like it, one for the archives I think (mental note, check the price of feed potatoes :)

        Slainte, Riku

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)" <Tony.Ackland@...> wrote:
        >
        > An email from a Finnish friend re using potatoes ....
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Teemu
        >
        > Sorry for my lousy english.
        >
        > Making vodka from potatoes
        >
        > Two good reasons for using potatoes:
        >
        > 1. Traditionally vodka is made of grain or potatoes to achieve the smooth &
        > soft aroma; witch is typical to commercial European vodkas.
        > 2. In Finland 1kg of sugar costs about 1,9e, 25kg sack of (feed) potatoes
        > from local Agri-Market costs 2e...
        >
        >
        > The recipe, witch may lead to prosecute:
        >
        > 20-25kg potatoes
        > 1kg of barley, malted and gristed
        > 50-100g of good (Turbo/Prestige/Partymann...) yeast (hydrated)
        > Some fresh water
        >
        > Equipment needed:
        > 30litre beer fermenter
        > A large (30-50litre) kettle (I use a milk can...)
        > A meat grinder (for mashing the potatoes)
        > A large scoop or a "wash paddle"
        > A hotplate with a thermostat
        >
        > 1. Clean all the dirt from the potatoes, (don't bother to peel them)
        > 2. Put the potatoes in to kettle and cover them with water, bring to boil.
        > Cook until the first ones break down -this should take about 1hr. In
        > meanwhile hydrate the yeast and mix 1kg malt and 2litre of water (if you use
        > homemade malt, don't dry them -it weakens the mysterious "amylathic power").
        > 3. Pour the water out from the kettle (use mittens, be careful). Mash the
        > potatoes in the grinder while they are hot. (If done right the mash looks
        > like thick porridge.)
        > 4. Put the mash to kettle (and adjust the hotplates temperature to 60C).
        > Add 1/3 of the hydrated malt to the kettle and stir well. Wait until the
        > temperature has dropt to 65C. Add the rest of the hydrated malt and stir in
        > well. Let sit there for about 2 hours. Stir often. (If done right the wash
        > should have turned flowing.)
        > 5. Turn the hotplate off. Put the kettle in somewhere cool. When the
        > temperature has dropped down to 25C pour to fermenter and add yeast (no
        > nutrients needed). First carbon dioxide bubbles should rise after couple of
        > hours; main fermenting takes about two days, ready for distilling in four
        > days -if you have done everything as written. Result will be 7-12vol%,
        > depending the starch level of potatoes.
        >
        > This is how I do it. There are many different ways too-but there are always
        > four steps.
        > 1. Softening the cellular walls.
        > 2. Mashing the potatoes.
        > In industrial scale steps one and two are usually done by using the
        > HENZE-kettle, witch is basically a direct-steam heated pressure cooker
        > (pressure is up to 8atm and the cooking time about 40min).
        > 3. Converting the starch to maltose.
        > 4. Fermenting.
        > Notice that there are only those 2l of water added to mash, no more are
        > required because the potatoes contains ¾ of water.
        >
        > P.S.
        >
        > If the wash is done right you should be able to distill it with a still that
        > has an inner heating element -I have a 2kW inner (silver plated) heating
        > element in mine.
        >
      • waljaco
        The stepped infusion mash recipe from South Africa came from our archive! People read us... http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/1343 wal
        Message 3 of 3 , Apr 30 3:18 AM
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          The stepped infusion mash recipe from South Africa came from our archive! People read us...
          http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers/message/1343
          wal

          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
          >
          > That sounds more like it, one for the archives I think (mental note, check the price of feed potatoes :)
          >
          > Slainte, Riku
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)" <Tony.Ackland@> wrote:
          > >
          > > An email from a Finnish friend re using potatoes ....
          > >
          > > -----Original Message-----
          > > From: Teemu
          > >
          > > Sorry for my lousy english.
          > >
          > > Making vodka from potatoes
          > >
          > > Two good reasons for using potatoes:
          > >
          > > 1. Traditionally vodka is made of grain or potatoes to achieve the smooth &
          > > soft aroma; witch is typical to commercial European vodkas.
          > > 2. In Finland 1kg of sugar costs about 1,9e, 25kg sack of (feed) potatoes
          > > from local Agri-Market costs 2e...
          > >
          > >
          > > The recipe, witch may lead to prosecute:
          > >
          > > 20-25kg potatoes
          > > 1kg of barley, malted and gristed
          > > 50-100g of good (Turbo/Prestige/Partymann...) yeast (hydrated)
          > > Some fresh water
          > >
          > > Equipment needed:
          > > 30litre beer fermenter
          > > A large (30-50litre) kettle (I use a milk can...)
          > > A meat grinder (for mashing the potatoes)
          > > A large scoop or a "wash paddle"
          > > A hotplate with a thermostat
          > >
          > > 1. Clean all the dirt from the potatoes, (don't bother to peel them)
          > > 2. Put the potatoes in to kettle and cover them with water, bring to boil.
          > > Cook until the first ones break down -this should take about 1hr. In
          > > meanwhile hydrate the yeast and mix 1kg malt and 2litre of water (if you use
          > > homemade malt, don't dry them -it weakens the mysterious "amylathic power").
          > > 3. Pour the water out from the kettle (use mittens, be careful). Mash the
          > > potatoes in the grinder while they are hot. (If done right the mash looks
          > > like thick porridge.)
          > > 4. Put the mash to kettle (and adjust the hotplates temperature to 60C).
          > > Add 1/3 of the hydrated malt to the kettle and stir well. Wait until the
          > > temperature has dropt to 65C. Add the rest of the hydrated malt and stir in
          > > well. Let sit there for about 2 hours. Stir often. (If done right the wash
          > > should have turned flowing.)
          > > 5. Turn the hotplate off. Put the kettle in somewhere cool. When the
          > > temperature has dropped down to 25C pour to fermenter and add yeast (no
          > > nutrients needed). First carbon dioxide bubbles should rise after couple of
          > > hours; main fermenting takes about two days, ready for distilling in four
          > > days -if you have done everything as written. Result will be 7-12vol%,
          > > depending the starch level of potatoes.
          > >
          > > This is how I do it. There are many different ways too-but there are always
          > > four steps.
          > > 1. Softening the cellular walls.
          > > 2. Mashing the potatoes.
          > > In industrial scale steps one and two are usually done by using the
          > > HENZE-kettle, witch is basically a direct-steam heated pressure cooker
          > > (pressure is up to 8atm and the cooking time about 40min).
          > > 3. Converting the starch to maltose.
          > > 4. Fermenting.
          > > Notice that there are only those 2l of water added to mash, no more are
          > > required because the potatoes contains ¾ of water.
          > >
          > > P.S.
          > >
          > > If the wash is done right you should be able to distill it with a still that
          > > has an inner heating element -I have a 2kW inner (silver plated) heating
          > > element in mine.
          > >
          >
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