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Re: Tripple Sec - Advice please

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  • gff_stwrt
    Thanks, Wal, and you re no doubt right as usual. Perhaps I should have said, tradition aside... ! At this stage of my hobby I am not much concerned with
    Message 1 of 24 , Feb 5, 2008
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      Thanks, Wal, and you're no doubt right as usual.
      Perhaps I should have said,"tradition aside..." !
      At this stage of my hobby I am not much concerned with making a
      product which is just the same as any well-known liqueur or spirit.
      I just want it to taste good. And look good.

      As I learn more I would love to try some of your traditional
      recipes, but I expect I will still be interested in trying different
      things, 'just to see if they work!'
      Thanks again for your help and encouragement.

      Regards,
      The Baker




      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
      >
      > "So what?!" Well the characteristic of a triple-sec is that it does
      > not go cloudy, so you can add ice to Cointreau or Curacao and still
      > have a clear drink. The visual aspect is also important.
      > wal
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "gff_stwrt" <gff_stwrt@> wrote:
      > >
      > > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "bbornais" <bbornais@> wrote:
      > > >
      > > > Sounds about right. The clouding is from the oils
      precipitating
      > > out
      > > > of solution as you drive the solubilizing power of the alcohol
      > > down.
      > > >
      > > > The rule is:
      > > >
      > > > Like dissolves like. The oils in the orange are slightly polar
      > > > organic, and so is the ethanol. As you add water, which is
      highly
      > > > polar aqueous phase, you drive out the least soluble
      ingredient,
      > > > which are the oils.
      > > >
      > > > The same thing happens with Absinthe. This is why it is stored
      at
      > > 70%
      > > > ABV, then cut back with water, causing the louche.
      > > >
      > > snip
      > > >
      > > > Bryan.
      > > >
      > > Hi, Bryan and folks,
      > >
      > > Okay, so a liqueur that goes milky when you add water to
      > > reduce the alcohol to 'sipping level' could be stored at (say)
      70%
      > > abv, which would look nice in the bottle and save a lot of
      space.
      > > Then when you want to drink it you add (say) an equal
      > > quantity of water to the glass.
      > > And it goes a bit milky in the glass. So what?!
      > > So do some other drinks anyway. (Pernod, I think?)
      > >
      > > Sounds like a good idea.
      > >
      > > Regards,
      > > The Baker
      > >
      >
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