Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: Replication

Expand Messages
  • Mark
    multiple sips... Talking only about consistancy: I read some where that if you keep the heads seperate and add some bicarbonate of soda to them that this will
    Message 1 of 6 , Feb 3, 2008
    • 0 Attachment
      multiple sips...

      Talking only about consistancy:

      I read some where that if you keep the heads seperate and add some
      bicarbonate of soda to them that this will reduce the ethel acetate
      and improve the taste. but I haven't tried this yet.

      I was taught that pH reduction changes ethyl acetate (that has a BP
      close to ethyl Al) into "good" ethyl and acetic acid - it doesn't do
      anything for head separation - it sharpens the change from "good"
      alcohol to tails. It increases the yield of clean ethyl at the
      expense of desirable and undesirable esters. I'd guess that for
      consistancy you'd want the "same" amount and types of esters - so I
      wouldn't do a pH reduction for whiskey, only for vodka/neutral spirit.


      do you think that higher gravity esters are better?

      Well, personally I like whiskeys from lower gravity washes - but my
      point was that different gravities (starting and ending) can make
      different tasting hootch.

      #7 I'm not quite sure what you mean by enzyme action.

      I was referring to the time/temp starch conversion steps, beginning
      at 122F and ending at 140F / 160F. Do you follow the exact same
      schedule each time?

      People in this group will beat me up for saying this, but I
      say "learning to make good whiskey you must first learn to make good
      beer". I was taught that the starch converstion process decides the
      taste of beer more than any other variable - including mashbill and
      yeast type.

      There are 6 variables in the starch converstion process - and these
      must be controlled to affect consistancy. (mash pH, mash stiffness,
      protein rest time, protein rest temp, starch conversion time, starch
      conversion temp)

      Shoot - another variable is the age and moisture content of the corn,
      but that's minor compared to the starch conversion process.
    Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.