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  • his_last_montreux
    The mini-still, okay, that sounds good. I was aware of the fact that I couldn t separate tails and heads with the Amazing still, I thought that half a dozen
    Message 1 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
      The mini-still, okay, that sounds good. I was aware of the fact that I
      couldn't separate tails and heads with the Amazing still, I thought
      that half a dozen passes through a Brita system would aid me there. So
      is there a limit for the yeast like there is for sugar? Or could I
      theoretically dump 10 times as much as I needed and have a better
      ferment without worry?

      Thanks for the advice, guys.

      -Erich

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Trid <triddlywinks@...> wrote:
      >
      > --- his_last_montreux <his_last_montreux@...> wrote:
      > > Saw this super simple mash on Tony Ackland's site -
      >
      > For starters, you can't find a better and more comprehensive source for
      > information than Tony's site...kudos for that...keep reading and
      re-reading it.
      >
      > > "One of my favorite recipes is simple: in a 5-gal (20L) bucket throw
      > > in 10-12 pounds (5kg) of white sugar, pour 2 1/2gal. (10L) of near
      > > boiling water in and stir well. then mix 2 gal. (8L) of your favorite
      > > fruit juice. I've found that the more exotic the fruit the better
      > > flavor you get. toss a good sized handful of yeast on top, stir well
      > > cover the bucket and leave in a warm place for 2 weeks.
      >
      > Not a bad start, but for simplicity's sake and price, replace the 2
      gallons of
      > fruit juice with 2 cups of unsulphured molasses (the darker the
      better) boiled
      > up in 2 gallons of water. The juice of one lemon will help invert
      the sugars
      > and add the necessary acidity to make the yeast happy. For these
      style washes,
      > I use a baby food jar (Gerber, to be specific) to measure out my
      yeast...I use
      > bulk red-star baking yeast (<$4.00 for a pound). It's a lot more
      than you
      > NEED, but the more yeast you use, the quicker and cleaner the
      fermentation.
      >
      > > Siphon into
      > > your still and cook at 180 degrees F (82C) and collect the spirit. One
      > > way to tell when to stop is when the liquid will no longer burn a
      > > bright blue flame."
      >
      > Ignore the temperature specified, and distill until the top of the
      column (this
      > location is important) is around 96C/205F. Your output will be
      around 10-12%
      > abv at this point (this is your "stripping run").
      >
      > > So assuming this low quality mash is prepared exactly as described, my
      > > main question is whether the fruit juice is supposed to supply the
      > > nutrients the yeast needs, and if so, should more expensive or frozen
      > > canned juice be used?
      >
      > You can use either...but then, if you're going for simplicity and
      economy,
      > molasses will do the trick.
      >
      > Now, after you've done your stripping run, you now have "low wines."
      Here's
      > where you can ether re-run the low wines very slowly through a
      pot-still like
      > setup or through a reflux rig, depending on what you have assembled for
      > yourself. However, at this stage you're much better off if you have an
      > all-metal setup and no plastic...trust me, the extra time and
      expense acquiring
      > and assembling the rig will be well worth it. There's continuous
      debate over
      > the merits and hazards over aluminum, so use your own judgment on
      that call.
      > Just stay away from galvanized anything. Copper is your best friend
      and worth
      > every penny of its current exorbitant cost.
      >
      > The mini-still has established a really good reputation for
      bang-for-the-buck
      > quality, but I have no personal experience with it as I lean towards
      pot stills
      > and the products they yield.
      >
      > Happy stillin' and keep us posted how things turn out.
      >
      > Trid
      > -gearing back up for some sour-mash peated single malt
      >
    • Trid
      ... Within reason...yes it will ferment just fine. However, it depends on what yeast you re using. Baking yeast doesn t flocculate well, so it will take a
      Message 2 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
        --- his_last_montreux <his_last_montreux@...> wrote:

        > The mini-still, okay, that sounds good. I was aware of the fact that I
        > couldn't separate tails and heads with the Amazing still, I thought
        > that half a dozen passes through a Brita system would aid me there. So
        > is there a limit for the yeast like there is for sugar? Or could I
        > theoretically dump 10 times as much as I needed and have a better
        > ferment without worry?

        Within reason...yes it will ferment just fine. However, it depends on what
        yeast you're using. Baking yeast doesn't flocculate well, so it will take a
        long time for it to settle out after the fermentation is complete...relatively
        speaking. Sometimes, if you have too much yeast in your wash when you run it
        through the still, that yeasty flavor is carried over into the finished product
        similar to the flavors from whisky or rum or brandy is carried over from their
        respective washes.

        In my early days of sugar washes, I'd get very impatient between fermenting and
        distilling and run my washes way too soon. The initial feedback from most was
        that it tasted "yeasty." There's a lot of discussion about using fining agents
        for clarifying the wash prior to distilling. Many people will distill the
        whole thing, grain, sludge, yeast and all. My personal take on it is to let
        time allow the yeast and sediment to fall out naturally, siphon off the
        clear-ish wash to run, and toss in more sugar/water/molasses mix in with the
        sediment of the previous run. I've run up to 7 successive batches on one dose
        of yeast...do aerate well between batches and watch your pH.

        I generally do 5 gallon washes, so if I start one bucket, I wait a week and
        start a second bucket fermenting. This sets me up where I can run one a week
        alternately. Two weeks should be plenty of time for fermenting and clarifying
        that's adequate for what we're doing. You can, of course, fine tune it to your
        recipes and conditions. Meanwhile, check your washes daily, taste and sniff to
        make sure your fermentations are doing their thing.

        Trid
        -come to think of it, I need some more neutral spirits for future "experiments"
      • joe giffen
        Hi , First ,you should not be on distillers,but on new distillers,second you should study distilling from the various sites available to you, and I am not
        Message 3 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
          Hi ,
          First ,you should  not be on distillers,but on new distillers,second you should study distilling from the various sites available to you, and I am not sure I understand what you are talking
          about. We are here to help anyone who wants to make safe and potable drink, using either pot or reflux stills. Our language is english,but I am sure we  would try to help anyone.
          Joe

          his_last_montreux <his_last_montreux@...> wrote:
          The mini-still, okay, that sounds good. I was aware of the fact that I
          couldn't separate tails and heads with the Amazing still, I thought
          that half a dozen passes through a Brita system would aid me there. So
          is there a limit for the yeast like there is for sugar? Or could I
          theoretically dump 10 times as much as I needed and have a better
          ferment without worry?

          Thanks for the advice, guys.

          -Erich

          --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, Trid <triddlywinks@ ...> wrote:
          >
          > --- his_last_montreux <his_last_montreux@ ...> wrote:
          > > Saw this super simple mash on Tony Ackland's site -
          >
          > For starters, you can't find a better and more comprehensive source for
          > information than Tony's site...kudos for that...keep reading and
          re-reading it.
          >
          > > "One of my favorite recipes is simple: in a 5-gal (20L) bucket throw
          > > in 10-12 pounds (5kg) of white sugar, pour 2 1/2gal. (10L) of near
          > > boiling water in and stir well. then mix 2 gal. (8L) of your favorite
          > > fruit juice. I've found that the more exotic the fruit the better
          > > flavor you get. toss a good sized handful of yeast on top, stir well
          > > cover the bucket and leave in a warm place for 2 weeks.
          >
          > Not a bad start, but for simplicity's sake and price, replace the 2
          gallons of
          > fruit juice with 2 cups of unsulphured molasses (the darker the
          better) boiled
          > up in 2 gallons of water. The juice of one lemon will help invert
          the sugars
          > and add the necessary acidity to make the yeast happy. For these
          style washes,
          > I use a baby food jar (Gerber, to be specific) to measure out my
          yeast...I use
          > bulk red-star baking yeast (<$4.00 for a pound). It's a lot more
          than you
          > NEED, but the more yeast you use, the quicker and cleaner the
          fermentation.
          >
          > > Siphon into
          > > your still and cook at 180 degrees F (82C) and collect the spirit. One
          > > way to tell when to stop is when the liquid will no longer burn a
          > > bright blue flame."
          >
          > Ignore the temperature specified, and distill until the top of the
          column (this
          > location is important) is around 96C/205F. Your output will be
          around 10-12%
          > abv at this point (this is your "stripping run").
          >
          > > So assuming this low quality mash is prepared exactly as described, my
          > > main question is whether the fruit juice is supposed to supply the
          > > nutrients the yeast needs, and if so, should more expensive or frozen
          > > canned juice be used?
          >
          > You can use either...but then, if you're going for simplicity and
          economy,
          > molasses will do the trick.
          >
          > Now, after you've done your stripping run, you now have "low wines."
          Here's
          > where you can ether re-run the low wines very slowly through a
          pot-still like
          > setup or through a reflux rig, depending on what you have assembled for
          > yourself. However, at this stage you're much better off if you have an
          > all-metal setup and no plastic...trust me, the extra time and
          expense acquiring
          > and assembling the rig will be well worth it. There's continuous
          debate over
          > the merits and hazards over aluminum, so use your own judgment on
          that call.
          > Just stay away from galvanized anything. Copper is your best friend
          and worth
          > every penny of its current exorbitant cost.
          >
          > The mini-still has established a really good reputation for
          bang-for-the- buck
          > quality, but I have no personal experience with it as I lean towards
          pot stills
          > and the products they yield.
          >
          > Happy stillin' and keep us posted how things turn out.
          >
          > Trid
          > -gearing back up for some sour-mash peated single malt
          >



          For ideas on reducing your carbon footprint visit Yahoo! For Good this month.

        • joe giffen
          What are you talking about?,the question you purport to answer is nonsense to anyone who knows about distilling.?. ... Within reason...yes it will ferment just
          Message 4 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
            What are you talking about?,the question you purport to answer is nonsense to anyone who knows about distilling.?.

            Trid <triddlywinks@...> wrote:
            --- his_last_montreux <his_last_montreux@ yahoo.com> wrote:

            > The mini-still, okay, that sounds good. I was aware of the fact that I
            > couldn't separate tails and heads with the Amazing still, I thought
            > that half a dozen passes through a Brita system would aid me there. So
            > is there a limit for the yeast like there is for sugar? Or could I
            > theoretically dump 10 times as much as I needed and have a better
            > ferment without worry?

            Within reason...yes it will ferment just fine. However, it depends on what
            yeast you're using. Baking yeast doesn't flocculate well, so it will take a
            long time for it to settle out after the fermentation is complete...relative ly
            speaking. Sometimes, if you have too much yeast in your wash when you run it
            through the still, that yeasty flavor is carried over into the finished product
            similar to the flavors from whisky or rum or brandy is carried over from their
            respective washes.

            In my early days of sugar washes, I'd get very impatient between fermenting and
            distilling and run my washes way too soon. The initial feedback from most was
            that it tasted "yeasty." There's a lot of discussion about using fining agents
            for clarifying the wash prior to distilling. Many people will distill the
            whole thing, grain, sludge, yeast and all. My personal take on it is to let
            time allow the yeast and sediment to fall out naturally, siphon off the
            clear-ish wash to run, and toss in more sugar/water/ molasses mix in with the
            sediment of the previous run. I've run up to 7 successive batches on one dose
            of yeast...do aerate well between batches and watch your pH.

            I generally do 5 gallon washes, so if I start one bucket, I wait a week and
            start a second bucket fermenting. This sets me up where I can run one a week
            alternately. Two weeks should be plenty of time for fermenting and clarifying
            that's adequate for what we're doing. You can, of course, fine tune it to your
            recipes and conditions. Meanwhile, check your washes daily, taste and sniff to
            make sure your fermentations are doing their thing.

            Trid
            -come to think of it, I need some more neutral spirits for future "experiments"



            Regards
            Joe


            Yahoo! Answers - Get better answers from someone who knows. Try it now.

          • Trid
            ... I understood it just fine and I both speak English and know (a thing or two) about distilling. While I overlook his statement towards the precept that
            Message 5 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
              --- joe giffen <joegiffen@...> wrote:

              > What are you talking about?,the question you purport to answer is nonsense to
              > anyone who knows about distilling.?.

              I understood it just fine and I both speak English and know (a thing or two)
              about distilling. While I overlook his statement towards the precept that
              filtering through a brita filter would substitute for proper cuts, I had no
              difficulty following the intent of his question...and if I did, I'm sure I'll
              be corrected.

              It does nobody any good to be so antagonistic and only serves to make you look
              more like a bully than a constructive contributor to the list.

              Lighten up, Joe.
              Trid
            • his_last_montreux
              ... nonsense to ... or two) ... precept that ... had no ... sure I ll ... make you look ... Thanks Trid. Yes, I should be posing questions to the New
              Message 6 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Trid <triddlywinks@...> wrote:
                >
                > --- joe giffen <joegiffen@...> wrote:
                >
                > > What are you talking about?,the question you purport to answer is
                nonsense to
                > > anyone who knows about distilling.?.
                >
                > I understood it just fine and I both speak English and know (a thing
                or two)
                > about distilling. While I overlook his statement towards the
                precept that
                > filtering through a brita filter would substitute for proper cuts, I
                had no
                > difficulty following the intent of his question...and if I did, I'm
                sure I'll
                > be corrected.
                >
                > It does nobody any good to be so antagonistic and only serves to
                make you look
                > more like a bully than a constructive contributor to the list.
                >
                > Lighten up, Joe.
                > Trid
                >

                Thanks Trid. Yes, I should be posing questions to the New Distillers
                group. It was really late when I first posted this, and I'm signed up
                for New Distillers but on my other Yahoo address, which I arranged,
                ironically, to avoid confusion between which one I was reading/posting
                on. I ask stupid questions because I'm overeager to learn. I know I'm
                nowhere near finished with the amount of reading I need to do online.
                New Distillers, I'm sure, will obviously be more lenient to such a
                newb. Hope I didn't ruin your life, Joe. =p
              • sonum norbu
                or you can make a coil in bucket pot still for 2/3 of stuff all, and really learn about making cuts...AND...fine likker. blanik ... Most of the troubles of
                Message 7 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                  or you can make a coil in bucket pot still for 2/3 of stuff all, and really learn about making cuts...AND...fine likker.

                  blanik

                  > ----- Original Message -----
                  > From: "joe giffen" <joegiffen@...>
                  > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                  > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: Hello
                  > Date: Mon, 8 Oct:58:58 +0100 (BST)
                  >
                  >
                  > OOPs meant Bryan.
                  >
                  > joe giffen <joegiffen@...> wrote: I can only
                  > endorse the words of bbornais. Avoid plastic except when
                  > fermenting. The amazing still is, in my honest opinion rubbish. The
                  > cheapest way to get into real distilling is probably bokokob,s mini
                  > still, which can be expanded easily to a 2inch still
                  > regards
                  > Joe
                  >
                  > bbornais <bbornais@...> wrote:
                  > Besides the fact that pretty much everybody tries to avoid plastics in
                  > the alcohol vapour path as much as possible, the main problem with such
                  > a still is taking cuts. If you are planning on learning this hobby,
                  > then there is not much this still can teach you, since you have no way
                  > of figuring out what foreshots, heads, hearts, and tails will
                  > smell/feel/taste like. And they will also be in your swill...which is
                  > gross.
                  >
                  > Bryan.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Regards
                  > Joe
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > For ideas on reducing your carbon footprint visit Yahoo! For
                  > Good this month.
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  >
                  > Regards
                  > Joe
                  >
                  > ---------------------------------
                  > For ideas on reducing your carbon footprint visit Yahoo! For Good this month.

                  >



                  "Most of the troubles of the world are caused by human beings". (Shakyamuni Buddha)

                  SOARING, SAILING AND SKYDIVING web page
                  http://www.angelfire.com/fl2/cloudbase/



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                • sonum norbu
                  I very much doubt that you have ruined Joe s life but beware of being overeager and trying shortcuts. Distilling is a serious business and needs to be
                  Message 8 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                    I very much doubt that you have ruined Joe's life but beware of being overeager and trying shortcuts. Distilling is a serious business and needs to be approached with a degree of caution, initially at least. I also had a great deal of difficulty following your post, but you haven't ruined my life either.

                    Read, read and re-read tony's book on http://homedistiller.org/




                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: his_last_montreux <his_last_montreux@...>
                    > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    > Subject: [Distillers] Re: Hello
                    > Date: Tue, 09 Oct:16:36 -0000
                    >
                    >
                    > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Trid <triddlywinks@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > --- joe giffen <joegiffen@...> wrote:
                    > >
                    > > > What are you talking about?,the question you purport to answer is
                    > nonsense to
                    > > > anyone who knows about distilling.?.
                    > >
                    > > I understood it just fine and I both speak English and know (a thing
                    > or two)
                    > > about distilling. While I overlook his statement towards the
                    > precept that
                    > > filtering through a brita filter would substitute for proper cuts, I
                    > had no
                    > > difficulty following the intent of his question...and if I did, I'm
                    > sure I'll
                    > > be corrected.
                    > >
                    > > It does nobody any good to be so antagonistic and only serves to
                    > make you look
                    > > more like a bully than a constructive contributor to the list.
                    > >
                    > > Lighten up, Joe.
                    > > Trid
                    > >
                    >
                    > Thanks Trid. Yes, I should be posing questions to the New Distillers
                    > group. It was really late when I first posted this, and I'm signed up
                    > for New Distillers but on my other Yahoo address, which I arranged,
                    > ironically, to avoid confusion between which one I was reading/posting
                    > on. I ask stupid questions because I'm overeager to learn. I know I'm
                    > nowhere near finished with the amount of reading I need to do online.
                    > New Distillers, I'm sure, will obviously be more lenient to such a
                    > newb. Hope I didn't ruin your life, Joe. =p

                    >



                    "Most of the troubles of the world are caused by human beings". (Shakyamuni Buddha)

                    SOARING, SAILING AND SKYDIVING web page
                    http://www.angelfire.com/fl2/cloudbase/



                    --
                    _______________________________________________
                    Surf the Web in a faster, safer and easier way:
                    Download Opera 9 at http://www.opera.com

                    Powered by Outblaze
                  • Trid
                    ... I will admit that my start in the hobby consisted of everything I could think of to make shortcuts. My failures at the hands of those shortcuts were every
                    Message 9 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                      --- sonum norbu <blanik@...> wrote:

                      > I very much doubt that you have ruined Joe's life but beware of being
                      > overeager and trying shortcuts. Distilling is a serious business and needs
                      > to be approached with a degree of caution, initially at least. I also had a
                      > great deal of difficulty following your post, but you haven't ruined my life
                      > either.

                      I will admit that my start in the hobby consisted of everything I could think
                      of to make shortcuts. My failures at the hands of those shortcuts were every
                      bit as valuable as lessons as getting things right. There's a lot to be said
                      for the value of lessons learned "the hard way" as I did. Besides, provided you
                      survive, there are grandly amusing stories to be told about those failures.

                      Trid
                      -hey y'all, watch this...OW!!!
                    • sonum norbu
                      YUP!! ... Most of the troubles of the world are caused by human beings . (Shakyamuni Buddha) SOARING, SAILING AND SKYDIVING web page
                      Message 10 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                        YUP!!


                        > ----- Original Message -----
                        > From: Trid <triddlywinks@...>
                        > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                        > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: Hello
                        > Date: Mon, 8 Oct:58:07 -0700 (PDT)
                        >
                        >
                        >
                        > --- sonum norbu <blanik@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > > I very much doubt that you have ruined Joe's life but beware of being
                        > > overeager and trying shortcuts. Distilling is a serious business and needs
                        > > to be approached with a degree of caution, initially at least. I also had a
                        > > great deal of difficulty following your post, but you haven't ruined my life
                        > > either.
                        >
                        > I will admit that my start in the hobby consisted of everything I could think
                        > of to make shortcuts. My failures at the hands of those shortcuts were every
                        > bit as valuable as lessons as getting things right. There's a lot to be said
                        > for the value of lessons learned "the hard way" as I did. Besides,
                        > provided you
                        > survive, there are grandly amusing stories to be told about those failures.
                        >
                        > Trid
                        > -hey y'all, watch this...OW!!!

                        >



                        "Most of the troubles of the world are caused by human beings". (Shakyamuni Buddha)

                        SOARING, SAILING AND SKYDIVING web page
                        http://www.angelfire.com/fl2/cloudbase/



                        --
                        _______________________________________________
                        Surf the Web in a faster, safer and easier way:
                        Download Opera 9 at http://www.opera.com

                        Powered by Outblaze
                      • abbababbaccc
                        Ahh, plastics and alcohol. A subject that has been strictly banned in some discussion groups. Well, in here we believe in research and technology and we can
                        Message 11 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                          Ahh, plastics and alcohol. A subject that has been strictly banned
                          in some discussion groups. Well, in here we believe in research and
                          technology and we can take a neutral view on the subject.

                          First of all, there are countless brands of plastics with different
                          chemical properties. Few of those have their uses in distillation
                          while the wast majority is not suited for our purposes - some may
                          even be dangerous or pose a threat to your health. So, it is
                          EXTREMELY important that you use only a brand of plastic that you
                          know will work under conditions you are exposing it to. Of course if
                          you are into experimenting do go ahead, just analyze results before
                          drinking the stuff.

                          Now as I said there are some plastics that are extremely usefull for
                          our purposes.

                          - The first of them is white PTFE (Teflon) tape. This can be used as
                          gasket material and few wraps of that around a leaking seam usually
                          fixes the leak. PTFE is also available in other forms and can be
                          used as a generic gasket material if you have machine tools to form
                          it.
                          - Then we have aquarium grade (non-toxic) RTV (room temperature
                          vulcanizing) silicone. That's another excellent gasket material that
                          you can mold or use as a glue, even inside the still and in the
                          vapor path. Just let it cure properly before exposing it to alcohol.

                          - The third useful material is polypropylene plastic that identified
                          by an arrow triangle with letters PP or number 5 in it. PP stands
                          the heat quite well and is inert to lower concentrations of alcohol
                          vapor. However, when in prolonged contact with high proof
                          ethanol/propanol vapors (tails in practice) some brands (there are
                          many brands of PP) have leached off softeners and deformed. The
                          usage I have found for PP in distillation is to use it as a boiler
                          material. PP buckets are widely sold as fermentation buckets and
                          provide excellent low cost boilers for our use. The only thing to
                          watch is to not distill high proof mashes in them. Even some
                          commercial still makers have used PP buckets as boilers for their
                          stills.

                          - Other plastics, there's at least Viton and few other higher cost
                          plastics that could be used as gasket materials. However, these are
                          not very common so I won't go into details with those.

                          So, to answer your actual question: Amazing still made from PP works
                          and it does not leach plastizisers unless they come from your
                          heater. It's a crude and inefficient design, although extremely easy
                          to operate and can be modified to become a decent pot still (bucket-
                          on-top-of-the-bucket design). For the money and trouble you will be
                          much better off by building a spirall still. Instructions for that
                          can be found here:
                          http://distillers.tastylime.net/library/Listings2.htm#Books%
                          20Listings

                          Cheers, Riku

                          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "his_last_montreux"
                          <his_last_montreux@...> wrote:
                          >
                          > Hi, I'm new to this newsgroup and currently interested in the
                          easiest
                          > method of distillation - the "amazing" low-temp plastic bucket-
                          style
                          > still you've probably heard about, before I move on to learning
                          > greater things. I've read that plastic is slightly soluble in
                          alcohol
                          > and thus is not good for stills, making the product cloudy, though
                          I'm
                          > sure that the poor quality (plastic-leaching or no) of the aquarium
                          > heater still can be improved to something palatable with decent
                          > activated carbon filtering. If someone who's worked with this type
                          of
                          > "still" could give me some feedback, I'd appreciate it greatly. The
                          > following is what I think is a primitive working plan - please
                          give me
                          > some comments! -
                          >
                          > Mash (very crude):
                          >
                          > Saw this super simple mash on Tony Ackland's site -
                          >
                          > "One of my favorite recipes is simple: in a 5-gal (20L) bucket
                          throw
                          > in 10-12 pounds (5kg) of white sugar, pour 2 1/2gal. (10L) of near
                          > boiling water in and stir well. then mix 2 gal. (8L) of your
                          favorite
                          > fruit juice. I've found that the more exotic the fruit the better
                          > flavor you get. toss a good sized handful of yeast on top, stir
                          well
                          > cover the bucket and leave in a warm place for 2 weeks. Siphon into
                          > your still and cook at 180 degrees F (82C) and collect the spirit.
                          One
                          > way to tell when to stop is when the liquid will no longer burn a
                          > bright blue flame."
                          >
                          > So assuming this low quality mash is prepared exactly as
                          described, my
                          > main question is whether the fruit juice is supposed to supply the
                          > nutrients the yeast needs, and if so, should more expensive or
                          frozen
                          > canned juice be used?
                          >
                          > Thanks,
                          > Erich
                          >
                        • abbababbaccc
                          This is actually a nice idea. Should you build the spiral still, you can use compression fittings on the spiral part and twist those spirals to use it as worm
                          Message 12 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                            This is actually a nice idea. Should you build the spiral still, you
                            can use compression fittings on the spiral part and twist those
                            spirals to use it as "worm in a bucket" type potstill as well.

                            Cheers, Riku

                            --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "sonum norbu" <blanik@...> wrote:
                            >
                            > or you can make a coil in bucket pot still for 2/3 of stuff all, and
                            really learn about making cuts...AND...fine likker.
                            >
                            > blanik
                            >
                            >
                          • Lloyd
                            =p, Don t give up. Hang in there. Pick out a still that you think you can make (or buy) and go from there. Don t worry about the first still. Make it cheap,
                            Message 13 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                              =p,
                                  Don't give up. Hang in there. Pick out a still that you think you can make (or buy) and go from there. Don't worry about the first still. Make it cheap, that's OK. Of course, keep it safe. Use common sense by all means. It is the learning that is important. After your first still, you will quickly see ways to improve it. If you are a young person, chances are you will create several, perhaps many, stills. Each better than the last. That is what we all do. That is why there is no "ONE PERFECT STILL". We just keep on improving and improvising to get what we want or think that we need. Some folks re-work their existing still while others decide that a completely new, radical approach, is necessary. If you really try at this hobby you will succeed. If you can't make drinking whiskey with all of the resources available to you on this and Tony's site then you should crawl under a rock and hide because so many, including myself, have started exactly where you are now and have done it - and done it well. We are pulling for you and please ask any questions that you have. There are no stupid questions but there are plenty of stupid answers. All of us started exactly where you are now. It seems like a lot to learn but it is really very simple. You heat it up and you cool it down. You add yeast to a sugar water and you get alcohol. The rest is just 'fine tuning'. You will learn a lot very quickly here. So stay tuned. Everyone here is into 'tweaking' and experimentation. I say start small. Get some success behind you and grow from there. Someday you will be double pot stilling a pure corn whiskey but until then try a simple sugar wash with turbo yeast through a reflux column still. It is fool proof and you will get a good foundation. Again, size and quality are not important on your first still. Your second still will be MUCH better and so will your third and so on.  Check out eBay for deals on "moonshine stills" or "ethanol"  or other key words that might cross your mind and buy a cheapo until you decide to design and build your own still. The first step in doing something great is just doing something.
                               
                              Lloyd
                               
                               
                              ----- Original Message -----
                              Sent: Monday, October 08, 2007 11:16 PM
                              Subject: [Distillers] Re: Hello

                              --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, Trid <triddlywinks@ ...> wrote:
                              >
                              > --- joe giffen <joegiffen@. ..> wrote:
                              >
                              > > What are you talking about?,the question you purport to answer is
                              nonsense to
                              > > anyone who knows about distilling.? .
                              >
                              > I understood it just fine and I both speak English and know (a thing
                              or two)
                              > about distilling. While I overlook his statement towards the
                              precept that
                              > filtering through a brita filter would substitute for proper cuts, I
                              had no
                              > difficulty following the intent of his question...and if I did, I'm
                              sure I'll
                              > be corrected.
                              >
                              > It does nobody any good to be so antagonistic and only serves to
                              make you look
                              > more like a bully than a constructive contributor to the list.
                              >
                              > Lighten up, Joe.
                              > Trid
                              >

                              Thanks Trid. Yes, I should be posing questions to the New Distillers
                              group. It was really late when I first posted this, and I'm signed up
                              for New Distillers but on my other Yahoo address, which I arranged,
                              ironically, to avoid confusion between which one I was reading/posting
                              on. I ask stupid questions because I'm overeager to learn. I know I'm
                              nowhere near finished with the amount of reading I need to do online.
                              New Distillers, I'm sure, will obviously be more lenient to such a
                              newb. Hope I didn't ruin your life, Joe. =p

                            • Larry
                              ... So THAT S what RTV means!!! I ve wondered about that a few times. Thanks!
                              Message 14 of 24 , Oct 8, 2007
                                At 12:33 AM 10/09/2007, you wrote:
                                >RTV (room temperature vulcanizing) silicone.

                                So THAT'S what RTV means!!! I've wondered about that a few times. Thanks!
                              • bbornais
                                ... Be cautious, however, when researching used stills. Avoid antique stills, as they are most likely constructed with lead based solder. Bryan.
                                Message 15 of 24 , Oct 9, 2007
                                  "Lloyd" <1@...> wrote:
                                  >Check out eBay for deals on "moonshine stills"

                                  Be cautious, however, when researching used stills. Avoid antique
                                  stills, as they are most likely constructed with lead based solder.

                                  Bryan.
                                • just me
                                  having made more than my share of mistakes(and still making them) the one thing i wish i had done from the beginning is to keep a journal on everything i had
                                  Message 16 of 24 , Oct 9, 2007
                                    having made more than my share of mistakes(and still making them) the one thing i wish i had done from the beginning is to keep a journal on everything i had done. i mean even the slightest detail. i hope this helps you. and dont get discouraged the sight in the left eye usually returns in a day or two. i hope this has helped.
                                    ----- Original Message -----
                                    Sent: Tuesday, October 09, 2007 12:10 AM
                                    Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: Hello

                                    YUP!!

                                    > ----- Original Message -----
                                    > From: Trid <triddlywinks@ yahoo.com>
                                    > To: Distillers@yahoogro ups.com
                                    > Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: Hello
                                    > Date: Mon, 8 Oct:58:07 -0700 (PDT)
                                    >
                                    >
                                    >
                                    > --- sonum norbu <blanik@operamail. com> wrote:
                                    >
                                    > > I very much doubt that you have ruined Joe's life but beware of being
                                    > > overeager and trying shortcuts. Distilling is a serious business and needs
                                    > > to be approached with a degree of caution, initially at least. I also had a
                                    > > great deal of difficulty following your post, but you haven't ruined my life
                                    > > either.
                                    >
                                    > I will admit that my start in the hobby consisted of everything I could think
                                    > of to make shortcuts. My failures at the hands of those shortcuts were every
                                    > bit as valuable as lessons as getting things right. There's a lot to be said
                                    > for the value of lessons learned "the hard way" as I did. Besides,
                                    > provided you
                                    > survive, there are grandly amusing stories to be told about those failures.
                                    >
                                    > Trid
                                    > -hey y'all, watch this...OW!!!

                                    >

                                    "Most of the troubles of the world are caused by human beings". (Shakyamuni Buddha)

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                                  • shinyhead13
                                    New member here. I look forward to reading and learning from you folks. I have been doing this for a short time but have turned out some very nice stuff.
                                    Message 17 of 24 , Jul 16, 2013
                                      New member here. I look forward to reading and learning from you folks. I have been doing this for a short time but have turned out some very nice stuff.
                                    • Zapata Vive
                                      Nice to meet ya shiny. What kind of stuff have you been making? Neutral or flavored spirits? I ve only done flavors up to now, though my column has been
                                      Message 18 of 24 , Jul 16, 2013
                                        Nice to meet ya shiny.  What kind of stuff have you been making?  Neutral or flavored spirits?  I've only done flavors up to now, though my column has been asking me why for the last couple of years ;)

                                        On Tue, Jul 16, 2013 at 9:26 PM, shinyhead13 <shinyhead13@...> wrote:
                                         

                                        New member here. I look forward to reading and learning from you folks. I have been doing this for a short time but have turned out some very nice stuff.


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