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Re: Hostetter's Bitters (another version)

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  • waljaco
    Most bitters are that bitter(Peruvian bark & gentian in this case) that the flavoring ingredients do not matter too much! I gather that their use in this
    Message 1 of 3 , Jul 3 3:58 AM
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      Most bitters are that bitter(Peruvian bark & gentian in this case)
      that the flavoring ingredients do not matter too much!
      I gather that their use in this manner began in London as an
      ingredient to a bittered sling using gin as the base spirit. Pimm's
      cup is a survivor of that tradition. Sling is derived from the German
      'slingen'.
      Previously they were herbal elixirs. Gentian & Cinchona calisaya is
      used in a bitters in Majorca - originally it was for malaria that was
      common here. It tastes vile taken straight!

      wal

      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "moonshinebook"
      <moonshinearchives@...> wrote:
      >
      > Hey Wal ~
      >
      > Hostetter's was such a commonly replicated bitters that recipes for
      > emulating them abounded. This one comes from a Prohibition-era
      > distiller's manuscript in my collection:
      >
      > Stomach Bitters equal to Hostetter's for one quarter cost
      >
      > European gentian root – 3/4 ounce
      > Orange Peel – 1 1/4 ounces
      > Cinnamon – 1/8 ounce
      > Anise seed – 1/4 ounce
      > Coriander seed – 1/4 ounce
      > Unground Peruvian bark – 1/4 ounce
      > Gum Kino – 1/8 ounce
      >
      > Bruise all these and put in half pint best alcohol. Let it stand for a
      > week and pour off. Boil the dregs in one pint of water. Strain and
      > press out all the strength. Dissolve 1/2 pound loaf sugar in the hot
      > liquid adding 1 1/2 quarts cold water and mix with the tincture first
      > poured off.
      >
      >
      >
      > ~ Matthew
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
      > >
      > > See msg 39807.
      > > There are 3 Bitters in 'Henley's Twentieth Century Book of Formulas,
      > > Processes and Trade Secrets', Hiscox G. D., 1912. One is a generic
      > > recipe, a Brandy Bitters and the other is called Hostetter's Bitters.
      > > I have scaled them down to 1 litre.
      > > There is a renewed interest in bitters among the cocktail crowd in the
      > > U.S.
      > >
      > > Bitters (1912, U.S.)
      > >
      > > 35 g gentian root (sliced)
      > > 30 g cinnamon
      > > 30 g caraway seed
      > > 6 g juniper berries
      > > 3 g cloves
      > > 1 litre alcohol (55%)
      > >
      > > Macerate for 10 days. Strain. Bottle.
      > >
      > > Brandy Bitters (1912, U.S.)
      > >
      > > 30 g gentian root (sliced)
      > > 20 g dried orange peel
      > > 10 g cardamon seed
      > > 5 g cinnamon
      > > 1 g cochineal
      > > 1 litre brandy (40%)
      > >
      > > Macerate for 10 days. Strain. Bottle.
      > >
      > > Hostetter's Bitters (1912, U.S.)
      > >
      > > 40 g sweet flag (Acorus calamus)
      > > 40 g orange peel
      > > 40 g Peruvian bark (Cinchona calisaya)
      > > 40 g gentian root
      > > 40 g calumba root (Jateorhiza palmata)
      > > 10 g rhubarb root (Rheum palmatum)
      > > 5 g cinnamon
      > > 2.5 g cloves
      > > 1 litre alcohol (55%)
      > > 40 g sugar
      > >
      > > Macerate for 10 days. Strain. Bottle.
      > >
      > > wal
      > >
      >
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