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Re: [Distillers] Re: Rethinking American vs. French oak - oak barrels used in aging of wine

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  • Home Distiller
    ... work ... Or another way of looking at it, if people didn t mess about accidental discoveries wouldn t occur, take stainless steel for example, it was a
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 2, 2007
      --- Home Distiller <home_distiller@...> wrote:

      > Don't know if it's a morbid sense of adventure just
      > to try different things to see if something will
      work
      > better or plain simple bordem to see what will
      > happen.

      Or another way of looking at it, if people didn't mess
      about accidental discoveries wouldn't occur, take
      stainless steel for example, it was a complete
      accident it was found. Last time I checked, we still
      don't know everything about everything :)


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    • !Zapata Vive!
      Of interest to me was this ... I believe there are a lot of Acacia s in Australia, just thought I d throw that out for you Ausies, might be worth experimenting
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 2, 2007
        Of interest to me was this
        Acacia imparts a yellow tint to the wine and is no longer common. 
        I believe there are a lot of Acacia's in Australia, just thought I'd throw that out for you Ausies, might be worth experimenting with, or at least researching.

        On Jul 1, 2007, at 11:23 PM, Home Distiller wrote:

        Ok it's an article about wine aging rather then spirit
        aging, but it was interesting how they pointed out the
        technique used to prepare the wood seems to be more
        important then if it's french or american white oak.

        http://findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_m3488/is_n11_v73/ai_13619651

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      • !Zapata Vive!
        There have been a few recent references recently to Red Devil Lye . I just wanted to mention that Red Devil no longer makes a pure lye product (NaOH). They
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 2, 2007
          There have been a few recent references recently to "Red Devil Lye".  I just wanted to mention that Red Devil no longer makes a pure lye product (NaOH).  They discontinued it a few years ago due it's popularity among illicit drug manufacturers.  But NaOH is also commonly used by many home chemists, ranging from the hobby experimenters to soap making and bio-fuels production.  If you are looking for a replacement for Red Devil, the brand Roebic "crystal drain opener" is sold in many big hardware stores in the US including Lowes and sometimes even Walmart, and it is as pure (or purer even) than Red Devil, and comes in a bigger bottle too.  

          Of course NaOH is also rather commonly available online as well, but the convenience of buying locally can't be beat.

          Just wanted to share an alternate source to another ridiculous casualty of prohibition.

          The two most recent references to Red Devil were:
          I pointed you to the process outlined by wiki because it is the
          traditional process. The modern process is in making hominy with
          sodium hydroxide, caustic soda, lye. I use about 40 grams in 12
          liters to do a small batch. I use the brand Red Devil because it is
          pure lye. I heat mine to boiling, add whole corn bring back to a
          boil, turn off heat and then let it set overnight. The next day the
          pericarp and germ will fall off. I usually give it a good rinse and
          most of it comes off with the rinsing. The soft starchy part is
          easily mashed and if you get most of the pericarp and germ off in the
          rinsing you get a pretty clear, non-viscous liquid that ferments real
          good. The germ will usuall filter out really easy if you miss it.
          This process sounds complicated but it yeilds much more convertable
          starch.

          and:
          Some readily available alkaline substances were Red Devil Lye(sodium
          hydroxide) Arm and Hammer Washing soda (sodium carbonate) Arm and
          Hammer Baking Soda( sodium bicarb.) hard wood ashes ( potassium
          carbonate) caustic potash from ashes and calcium hydroxide(potassium
          hydroxide) eggshells (calcium carbonate) and lime (calcium hydroxide)
          and lastly ammonia hydrate(common household ammonia not the anhydrous
          stuff)

        • Home Distiller
          ... This article towards the bottom mentions that Japanese cedar was used to age sake. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aging_barrel
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 2, 2007
            --- !Zapata Vive! <zapatavive@...> wrote:

            > Of interest to me was this
            > > Acacia imparts a yellow tint to the wine and is no
            > longer common.
            > I believe there are a lot of Acacia's in Australia,
            > just thought I'd
            > throw that out for you Ausies, might be worth
            > experimenting with, or
            > at least researching.

            This article towards the bottom mentions that Japanese
            cedar was used to age sake.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aging_barrel





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          • pint_o_shine
            Fortunately in my area it is still available. I just bought some. It is a regional thing as to which is available. The contaminated stuff does indeed have
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 3, 2007
              Fortunately in my area it is still available. I just bought some. It
              is a regional thing as to which is available. The contaminated stuff
              does indeed have small zinc pellets and some calcium carbonate in it.
              It is very easy to tell the difference. Ace Hardware is still stocking
              the pure stuff in my area and it says so on the label. I haven't seen
              the Roebic brand here yet. Thanks for the tip.

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, !Zapata Vive! <zapatavive@...> wrote:
              >
              > There have been a few recent references recently to "Red Devil Lye".
              > I just wanted to mention that Red Devil no longer makes a pure lye
              > product (NaOH). They discontinued it a few years ago due it's
              > popularity among illicit drug manufacturers. But NaOH is also
              > commonly used by many home chemists, ranging from the hobby
              > experimenters to soap making and bio-fuels production. If you are
              > looking for a replacement for Red Devil, the brand Roebic "crystal
              > drain opener" is sold in many big hardware stores in the US including
              > Lowes and sometimes even Walmart, and it is as pure (or purer even)
              > than Red Devil, and comes in a bigger bottle too.
              >
              > Of course NaOH is also rather commonly available online as well, but
              > the convenience of buying locally can't be beat.
              >
              > Just wanted to share an alternate source to another ridiculous
              > casualty of prohibition.
              >
              > The two most recent references to Red Devil were:
              > > I pointed you to the process outlined by wiki because it is the
              > > traditional process. The modern process is in making hominy with
              > > sodium hydroxide, caustic soda, lye. I use about 40 grams in 12
              > > liters to do a small batch. I use the brand Red Devil because it is
              > > pure lye. I heat mine to boiling, add whole corn bring back to a
              > > boil, turn off heat and then let it set overnight. The next day the
              > > pericarp and germ will fall off. I usually give it a good rinse and
              > > most of it comes off with the rinsing. The soft starchy part is
              > > easily mashed and if you get most of the pericarp and germ off in the
              > > rinsing you get a pretty clear, non-viscous liquid that ferments real
              > > good. The germ will usuall filter out really easy if you miss it.
              > > This process sounds complicated but it yeilds much more convertable
              > > starch.
              >
              > and:
              > > Some readily available alkaline substances were Red Devil Lye(sodium
              > > hydroxide) Arm and Hammer Washing soda (sodium carbonate) Arm and
              > > Hammer Baking Soda( sodium bicarb.) hard wood ashes ( potassium
              > > carbonate) caustic potash from ashes and calcium hydroxide(potassium
              > > hydroxide) eggshells (calcium carbonate) and lime (calcium hydroxide)
              > > and lastly ammonia hydrate(common household ammonia not the anhydrous
              > > stuff)
              >
            • Robert Hubble
              Hi Pint, In the last year or so Red Devil has become unavailable in our area, but last month I picked up a 20 oz jar of Glug , a drain cleaner whose sole
              Message 6 of 9 , Jul 3, 2007
                Hi Pint,

                In the last year or so Red Devil has become unavailable in our area, but
                last month I picked up a 20 oz jar of "Glug", a drain cleaner whose sole
                listed ingredient is sodium hydroxide. Of course, it *may* have been on the
                shelf for awhile in my small local hardware store, and he may not be able to
                restock it.

                No matter, it cleaned the HELL out my bathroom sink drain!



                Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller





                >From: "pint_o_shine" <pintoshine@...>
                >Reply-To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                >To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                >Subject: [Distillers] Re: Red Devil Lye, NaOH
                >Date: Tue, 03 Jul 2007 11:18:50 -0000
                >
                >Fortunately in my area it is still available. I just bought some. It
                >is a regional thing as to which is available. The contaminated stuff
                >does indeed have small zinc pellets and some calcium carbonate in it.
                >It is very easy to tell the difference. Ace Hardware is still stocking
                >the pure stuff in my area and it says so on the label. I haven't seen
                >the Roebic brand here yet. Thanks for the tip.
                >
                -----snip-----

                > > > Some readily available alkaline substances were Red Devil Lye(sodium
                > > > hydroxide) Arm and Hammer Washing soda (sodium carbonate) Arm and
                > > > Hammer Baking Soda( sodium bicarb.) hard wood ashes ( potassium
                > > > carbonate) caustic potash from ashes and calcium hydroxide(potassium
                > > > hydroxide) eggshells (calcium carbonate) and lime (calcium hydroxide)
                > > > and lastly ammonia hydrate(common household ammonia not the anhydrous
                > > > stuff)
                > >
                >
                >

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