Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

Re: How critical do ya reckon it is to have American white oak? WAS RE: [Distiller

Expand Messages
  • plumbondude
    Cool I ll go and see if I can find it at homedistiller. I don t know if the oak around here is american white oak but I know its not native would be pretty
    Message 1 of 11 , Jul 1, 2007
    • 0 Attachment
      Cool I'll go and see if I can find it at homedistiller. I don't know
      if the oak around here is american white oak but I know its not
      native would be pretty awesome if it was the american white oak. I
      do remember seeing some that had pretty much white bark but weather
      white oak is named for the colour of its bark or not? I don't know.

      Cheers

      Matt


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cadence22003" <cadence22003@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > -listen to robert, matt ,, he is like the oracle very wise
      >
      > tasmanian oak is a form of myrtle and no aussie wood is suitable to
      > the best of my knowledge for 2x main reasons,,,,,either too oily or
      > too porous
      >
      > quercus alba is brought out from U.S. for several other reasons
      > including the georgeous aromatics it gives up to the spirit
      >
      > stick to buying old bourbon barrels or chips / shavings from H.B.
      shop
      > [as mentioned] and follow roberts other good advice go to
      > homedistiller.org and have a good look around , that site has a
      > wonderful search facility
      >
      > happy hunting brian
      >
      >
      >
      > -- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Robert N" <dinks_c@> wrote:
      > >
      > > Given that you live in OZ, it is quite critical as those trees
      could
      > be any
      > > sub-species. For flavouring of spirits you do need the correct
      > variety as
      > > some (red oak) give an awful flavour and Tasmanian oak is, I
      believe
      > to be a
      > > eucalypt, which shouldn't be used at all. For a fuller answer
      have
      > a bit of
      > > a search around the forums as this topic has been discussed many
      times
      > > previously.
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Yours in Spirit
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > Robert
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > From: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      [mailto:Distillers@yahoogroups.com] On
      > > Behalf Of plumbondude
      > > Sent: Sunday, 1 July 2007 10:08 AM
      > > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      > > Subject: [Distillers] Re: thanks harry and answer to matt
      > >
      > >
      > >
      > > I was wondering too, around my home town there's oak tree's
      growing
      > > everywhere.Planted by the council. There actually a pain in the
      arse
      > > this time of year when their dropping leaves everywhere. There
      seems
      > > to be a few different species in and around the streets and
      parks. I
      > > was wondering if it would be worth getting some large branches
      and
      > > chipping them.I tried to identify what species they were a while
      > > back but had no luck. How critical do ya reckon it is to have
      > > american white oak?
      > >
      >
    • waljaco
      Don t forget that in making barrels the oak planks are seasoned for a long time - many of the harsher compounds are lost. Using tree branches will give you a
      Message 2 of 11 , Jul 1, 2007
      • 0 Attachment
        Don't forget that in making barrels the oak planks are seasoned for a
        long time - many of the harsher compounds are lost. Using tree
        branches will give you a rougher product.
        wal

        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "plumbondude" <plumbondude@...> wrote:
        >
        > Cool I'll go and see if I can find it at homedistiller. I don't know
        > if the oak around here is american white oak but I know its not
        > native would be pretty awesome if it was the american white oak. I
        > do remember seeing some that had pretty much white bark but weather
        > white oak is named for the colour of its bark or not? I don't know.
        >
        > Cheers
        >
        > Matt
        >
        >
        > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "cadence22003" <cadence22003@>
        > wrote:
        > >
        > > -listen to robert, matt ,, he is like the oracle very wise
        > >
        > > tasmanian oak is a form of myrtle and no aussie wood is suitable to
        > > the best of my knowledge for 2x main reasons,,,,,either too oily or
        > > too porous
        > >
        > > quercus alba is brought out from U.S. for several other reasons
        > > including the georgeous aromatics it gives up to the spirit
        > >
        > > stick to buying old bourbon barrels or chips / shavings from H.B.
        > shop
        > > [as mentioned] and follow roberts other good advice go to
        > > homedistiller.org and have a good look around , that site has a
        > > wonderful search facility
        > >
        > > happy hunting brian
        > >
        > >
        > >
        > > -- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Robert N" <dinks_c@> wrote:
        > > >
        > > > Given that you live in OZ, it is quite critical as those trees
        > could
        > > be any
        > > > sub-species. For flavouring of spirits you do need the correct
        > > variety as
        > > > some (red oak) give an awful flavour and Tasmanian oak is, I
        > believe
        > > to be a
        > > > eucalypt, which shouldn't be used at all. For a fuller answer
        > have
        > > a bit of
        > > > a search around the forums as this topic has been discussed many
        > times
        > > > previously.
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Yours in Spirit
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > Robert
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > From: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:Distillers@yahoogroups.com] On
        > > > Behalf Of plumbondude
        > > > Sent: Sunday, 1 July 2007 10:08 AM
        > > > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > > > Subject: [Distillers] Re: thanks harry and answer to matt
        > > >
        > > >
        > > >
        > > > I was wondering too, around my home town there's oak tree's
        > growing
        > > > everywhere.Planted by the council. There actually a pain in the
        > arse
        > > > this time of year when their dropping leaves everywhere. There
        > seems
        > > > to be a few different species in and around the streets and
        > parks. I
        > > > was wondering if it would be worth getting some large branches
        > and
        > > > chipping them.I tried to identify what species they were a while
        > > > back but had no luck. How critical do ya reckon it is to have
        > > > american white oak?
        > > >
        > >
        >
      • whynda
        ... How critical do ya reckon it is to have ... g day, As has been already mentioned, American White Oak is very critical to flavour your product. Other wood
        Message 3 of 11 , Jul 1, 2007
        • 0 Attachment
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "plumbondude" <plumbondude@...>
          wrote:
          >
          > Snip


          How critical do ya reckon it is to have
          > american white oak?
          >



          g'day,

          As has been already mentioned, American White Oak is very critical to
          flavour your product. Other wood varieties have been tried with
          varying success. Obviously some timbers can be eliminated right away
          as being unsuitable due to undesirable smells and/or differing
          aromatic compounds contained therein. I live on the South Coast of
          NSW and we have a timber merchant here that stocks imported timber
          for the craft furniture and cabinet makers in the area and he has
          American White Oak and often it is possible to get small pieces from
          him at very reasonable cost. I suggest that you have a look in the
          phone book and try to track down a timber merchant in your area that
          does a similar kind of business. ..

          hope this is of help to you ....regards
        • Tony Smith
          Check out this link as it may help you identify the tree http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/White_oak Enjoy waljaco wrote: Don t forget that in
          Message 4 of 11 , Jul 1, 2007
          • 0 Attachment
            Check out this link as it may help you identify the tree
             
             
            Enjoy
             


            waljaco <waljaco@...> wrote:

            Don't forget that in making barrels the oak planks are seasoned for a
            long time - many of the harsher compounds are lost. Using tree
            branches will give you a rougher product.
            wal

            --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "plumbondude" <plumbondude@ ...> wrote:
            >
            > Cool I'll go and see if I can find it at homedistiller. I don't know
            > if the oak around here is american white oak but I know its not
            > native would be pretty awesome if it was the american white oak. I
            > do remember seeing some that had pretty much white bark but weather
            > white oak is named for the colour of its bark or not? I don't know.
            >
            > Cheers
            >
            > Matt
            >
            >
            > --- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "cadence22003" <cadence22003@ >
            > wrote:
            > >
            > > -listen to robert, matt ,, he is like the oracle very wise
            > >
            > > tasmanian oak is a form of myrtle and no aussie wood is suitable to
            > > the best of my knowledge for 2x main reasons,,,,, either too oily or
            > > too porous
            > >
            > > quercus alba is brought out from U.S. for several other reasons
            > > including the georgeous aromatics it gives up to the spirit
            > >
            > > stick to buying old bourbon barrels or chips / shavings from H.B.
            > shop
            > > [as mentioned] and follow roberts other good advice go to
            > > homedistiller. org and have a good look around , that site has a
            > > wonderful search facility
            > >
            > > happy hunting brian
            > >
            > >
            > >
            > > -- In Distillers@yahoogro ups.com, "Robert N" <dinks_c@> wrote:
            > > >
            > > > Given that you live in OZ, it is quite critical as those trees
            > could
            > > be any
            > > > sub-species. For flavouring of spirits you do need the correct
            > > variety as
            > > > some (red oak) give an awful flavour and Tasmanian oak is, I
            > believe
            > > to be a
            > > > eucalypt, which shouldn't be used at all. For a fuller answer
            > have
            > > a bit of
            > > > a search around the forums as this topic has been discussed many
            > times
            > > > previously.
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Yours in Spirit
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > Robert
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > From: Distillers@yahoogro ups.com
            > [mailto:Distillers@yahoogro ups.com] On
            > > > Behalf Of plumbondude
            > > > Sent: Sunday, 1 July 2007 10:08 AM
            > > > To: Distillers@yahoogro ups.com
            > > > Subject: [Distillers] Re: thanks harry and answer to matt
            > > >
            > > >
            > > >
            > > > I was wondering too, around my home town there's oak tree's
            > growing
            > > > everywhere.Planted by the council. There actually a pain in the
            > arse
            > > > this time of year when their dropping leaves everywhere. There
            > seems
            > > > to be a few different species in and around the streets and
            > parks. I
            > > > was wondering if it would be worth getting some large branches
            > and
            > > > chipping them.I tried to identify what species they were a while
            > > > back but had no luck. How critical do ya reckon it is to have
            > > > american white oak?
            > > >
            > >
            >



            Pinpoint customers who are looking for what you sell.

          • plumbondude
            Yeah I was thinking about that. Hey whats the name of the place on the south coast I go back home down the coast every weekend. Thanks for that link too tony.
            Message 5 of 11 , Jul 2, 2007
            • 0 Attachment
              Yeah I was thinking about that. Hey whats the name of the place on
              the south coast I go back home down the coast every weekend.
              Thanks for that link too tony.

              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "whynda" <hstuiber@...> wrote:
              >
              > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "plumbondude" <plumbondude@>
              > wrote:
              > >
              > > Snip
              >
              >
              > How critical do ya reckon it is to have
              > > american white oak?
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > g'day,
              >
              > As has been already mentioned, American White Oak is very critical
              to
              > flavour your product. Other wood varieties have been tried with
              > varying success. Obviously some timbers can be eliminated right
              away
              > as being unsuitable due to undesirable smells and/or differing
              > aromatic compounds contained therein. I live on the South Coast of
              > NSW and we have a timber merchant here that stocks imported timber
              > for the craft furniture and cabinet makers in the area and he has
              > American White Oak and often it is possible to get small pieces
              from
              > him at very reasonable cost. I suggest that you have a look in the
              > phone book and try to track down a timber merchant in your area
              that
              > does a similar kind of business. ..
              >
              > hope this is of help to you ....regards
              >
            Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.