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Best malt to use for corn whiskey and where do you get it?

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  • Rob
    Hello, I would like to do a corn whiskey, but can not find malt local. Is there anywhere I can order it off the internet and also what would be the best malt
    Message 1 of 5 , Jun 30, 2007
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      Hello, I would like to do a corn whiskey, but can not find malt local.
      Is there anywhere I can order it off the internet and also what would
      be the best malt to use. Thanks for your time,
      Rob
    • just me
      brewhaus.com has what you need. he usually ships same day.
      Message 2 of 5 , Jun 30, 2007
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        brewhaus.com has what you need. he usually ships same day.
      • toddk63
        and also what would ... Traditionally, US 6-row is used due to its high diastatic power (DP). However, any good pale 2-row would work fine (i.e. Marris Otter).
        Message 3 of 5 , Jul 3, 2007
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          and also what would
          > be the best malt to use. Thanks for your time,
          > Rob
          >

          Traditionally, US 6-row is used due to its high diastatic power (DP).
          However, any good pale 2-row would work fine (i.e. Marris Otter).
          The difference in DP is negligable.

          Todd K.
        • Trid
          ... I ve traditionally used 6 row as it s 2/3 the price of the 2 row at my preferred LHBS (not to mention that this is the only store locally that carries 6
          Message 4 of 5 , Jul 3, 2007
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            --- toddk63 <toddk63@...> wrote:

            > and also what would
            > > be the best malt to use. Thanks for your time,
            > > Rob
            > >
            >
            > Traditionally, US 6-row is used due to its high diastatic power (DP).
            > However, any good pale 2-row would work fine (i.e. Marris Otter).
            > The difference in DP is negligable.

            I've traditionally used 6 row as it's 2/3 the price of the 2 row at my
            preferred LHBS (not to mention that this is the only store locally that carries
            6 row).

            I've recently picked up a bottle of enzymes (the label only says "amylase" so
            I'm going to make the assumption that it's a blend of alpha and beta) so I'm
            going to be trying an exclusively corn batch soon using the amylase.

            Trid
          • mike karnowski
            ... diastatic power (DP). ... Marris Otter). ... Actually the diastatic power of British Ale Malts is pretty low compared to domestic malts. British malts
            Message 5 of 5 , Jul 4, 2007
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              >Traditionally, US 6-row is used due to its high
              diastatic power (DP).
              >However, any good pale 2-row would work fine (i.e.
              Marris Otter).
              >The difference in DP is negligable.

              >Todd K.

              Actually the diastatic power of British Ale Malts
              is pretty low compared to domestic malts. British
              malts usually have enough extra enzymes to convert an
              additional 30-50% starch while domestic 2-row or 6-row
              has enough enzymes to convert 2-3 times it's weight in
              starch. If you can find out the malt specs look for
              the degrees Lintner, that will tell you it's diastatic
              power. Here's an excerpt from Greg Noonan's article on
              understanding malt analysis:
              http://brewingtechniques.com/bmg/noonan.html

              Starch conversion: Diastatic power (┬░Lintner, IOB).
              Diastatic power (DP) expresses the strength of
              starch-reducing enzymes in the malt and is measured in
              ┬░Lintner (sometimes referred to as IOB or .25 maltose
              equivalent). Diastatic power, considered together with
              mealiness/vitreosity (see below), indicates how well a
              malt will respond to mashing. The DP may be as low as
              35-40 for a well-converted, low-protein British ale
              malt, about 100 for a European lager malt, and 125 or
              greater for high-protein American two-row malt.
              Six-row malts can have DPs as high as 160. The latter
              malts have more protein, and thus more enzymes to
              reduce far more than just their own starches, while
              the British malts have enough only to convert their
              own weight under normal infusion mash conditions.

              cheers, mike




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