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Homemade wine/fruit press

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  • waljaco
    A press for fruit and grapes is useful for those making alcohol from a fruit mash - e.g. brandy, grappa, calvados (apple jack), slivovica. Here are some useful
    Message 1 of 6 , Dec 19, 2001
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      A press for fruit and grapes is useful for those making alcohol from
      a fruit mash - e.g. brandy, grappa, calvados (apple jack), slivovica.
      Here are some useful sites:

      "Instructions to build a fruit press"
      http://freespace.virgin.net/roger.simmonds/press.htm
      "Plans for cider presses and mills" - 3 press links.
      http://web.bham.ac.uk/GraftonG/cider/press.htm
      "Making a press"
      http://ourworld.compuserve.com/homepages/andrew_lea/press.htm
      "Homemade wine press"
      http://members.iinet.net.au/~kookie/
      "Paul's winemaking press"
      http://www.geocities.com/NapaValley/Vineyard/1762/pressplans.html

      Wal
    • Mike Staggs
      Hi all If I built a six inch column on a 50 gallon boiler; How tall would the column be and how fast should I expect output to be? I have been operating a Bob
      Message 2 of 6 , Dec 19, 2001
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        Hi all
        If I built a six inch column on a 50 gallon boiler; How tall would the
        column be and how fast should I expect output to be? I have been operating a
        Bob Lennon still on a beer keg for two years now. I now what to produce
        enough to use as fuel as well as copious amounts of cocktail makins :)


        Mike
      • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
        Mike, ... What sort of purity do you want ? What will you be using for packing material ? Do you already have an element size chosen, or are open to
        Message 3 of 6 , Dec 19, 2001
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          Mike,

          > If I built a six inch column on a 50 gallon boiler; How
          > tall would the
          > column be and how fast should I expect output to be?

          What sort of purity do you want ?
          What will you be using for packing material ?
          Do you already have an element size chosen, or are open to suggestions ?

          Tony
        • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
          Mike, ... A 6 column is quite wide - 16 times the cross-sectional area of a 1.5 column. This would mean that its suited more to a heat input of around 1800
          Message 4 of 6 , Dec 26, 2001
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            Mike,

            > I was looking for a purity similar to what I am getting with
            > my smaller still about 90% to 95% I was hoping to
            > still use scrubbers,
            >
            > > If I built a six inch column on a 50 gallon boiler; How
            > > tall would the
            > > column be and how fast should I expect output to be?

            A 6" column is quite wide - 16 times the cross-sectional area of a 1.5"
            column. This would mean that its suited more to a heat input of around 1800
            x 16 = 28.8 kW ! The risk of making the column too wide is that the
            refluxing liquid may not get to meet the rising vapour - they may be making
            their paths in different areas of the column and not cross paths. Without
            that interaction you wont get the purity happening. You need to keep the
            column width within a sensible zone for the amount of heat you put in. You
            can go slightly larger without compromising things, but there does come a
            point where too big is too big. Too small though hits you a lot faster - so
            definitely err on the side of "slightly larger" rather than "it might be
            tight".

            I know that 1800W works well for me with 1.5" diameter, so I scale up from
            there ...

            For constant vapour rate per cross-sectional area ...

            1.00" = 800 W
            1.25" = 1250 W
            1.50" = 1800 W
            1.75" = 2450 W
            2.00" = 3200 W
            2.25" = 4050 W
            2.50" = 5000 W

            The heat input determines the amount of vapour. If collected at the
            condenser at say 95%, it works out roughly to the following figures. If you
            run a reflux ratio of 4 (e.g. return 40 mL for every 10 mL you keep -
            typical for SS scrubbers) - then the second figure is the flowrate you'd
            expect to collect at ...

            1000 W = 52 mL/min (RR=0) or 10 mL/min (RR=4)
            1500 W = 78 mL/min or 16 mL/min
            2000 W = 105 mL/min or 21 mL/min
            2500 W = 131 mL/min or 26 mL/min
            3000 W = 157 mL/min or 32 mL/min
            3500 W = 183 mL/min or 36 mL/min
            4000 W = 209 mL/min or 42 mL/min

            Its the column height that will determine the purity. Again, based on
            personal experience, stainless steel scouring pads, if run with a RR=4 give
            an HETP of around 12 cm. Marbles are more like HETP=33cm, or raschig rings
            give around 24cm.

            So for scrubbers & a 10% wash, the following purities should be somewhat
            indicative...

            1 HETP = 12cm = 53%
            2 HETP = 24cm = 80%
            3 HETP = 36cm = 87%
            4 HETP = 48cm = 90%
            5 HETP = 60cm = 92%
            6 HETP = 72cm = 92.6%
            7 HETP = 84cm = 93.3%
            8 HETP = 96cm = 93.8%
            9 HETP = 108cm = 94.2%
            10 HETP = 120cm = 94.4%

            Note though that the wash wont always be at 10% alcohol. You also want the
            column to work well when the pot is almost empty ... The following are for
            scrubbers and a 1% wash ...

            1 HETP = 12cm = 9%
            2 HETP = 24cm = 51%
            3 HETP = 36cm = 80%
            4 HETP = 48cm = 87%
            5 HETP = 60cm = 90%
            6 HETP = 72cm = 91.6%
            7 HETP = 84cm = 92.6%
            8 HETP = 96cm = 93.3%
            9 HETP = 108cm = 93.8%
            10 HETP = 120cm = 94.1%

            This is why very short columns struggle to keep their purity during the run,
            unlike taller ones.

            So Mike, use these to get a few combinations that suit you. I'd suggest
            that you choose a narrower column, one that will suit the amount of heat
            you're planning to use. For the height, you want at least 1m. If you make
            it taller than necessary, you should be able to run it at a lower reflux
            ratio and collect the distillate faster.

            Tony
          • klcampbell
            G day Tony,surely there is a limit to how much power anybody can load their electricity supply to deliver. Maybe Mike has a direct line to a power station?but
            Message 5 of 6 , Dec 27, 2001
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              G'day Tony,surely there is a limit to how much power anybody can load their electricity supply to deliver.
              Maybe Mike has a direct line to a power station?but 28.5Kw. is only available to an industrial site.
              Regards,Ken.  
              ----- Original Message -----
              Sent: Thursday, 27 December 2001 12:58
              Subject: RE: [Distillers] Column size and output

              Mike,

              > I was looking for a purity similar to what I am getting with
              > my smaller still about 90% to 95% I was hoping to
              > still use scrubbers,
              >
              > > If I built a six inch column on a 50 gallon boiler; How
              > > tall would the
              > > column be and how fast should I expect output to be?

              A 6" column is quite wide - 16 times the cross-sectional area of a 1.5"
              column.  This would mean that its suited more to a heat input of around 1800
              x 16 = 28.8 kW !  The risk of making the column too wide is that the
              refluxing liquid may not get to meet the rising vapour - they may be making
              their paths in different areas of the column and not cross paths.  Without
              that interaction you wont get the purity happening.  You need to keep the
              column width within a sensible zone for the amount of heat you put in.  You
              can go slightly larger without compromising things, but there does come a
              point where too big is too big.  Too small though hits you a lot faster - so
              definitely err on the side of "slightly larger" rather than "it might be
              tight".

              I know that 1800W works well for me with 1.5" diameter, so I scale up from
              there ...

              For constant vapour rate per cross-sectional area ...

              1.00" =  800 W
              1.25" = 1250 W
              1.50" = 1800 W
              1.75" = 2450 W
              2.00" = 3200 W
              2.25" = 4050 W
              2.50" = 5000 W

              The heat input determines the amount of vapour.  If collected at the
              condenser at say 95%, it works out roughly to the following figures.  If you
              run a reflux ratio of 4 (e.g. return 40 mL for every 10 mL you keep -
              typical for SS scrubbers) - then the second figure is the flowrate you'd
              expect to collect at ...

              1000 W = 52 mL/min (RR=0) or 10 mL/min (RR=4)
              1500 W = 78 mL/min or 16 mL/min
              2000 W = 105 mL/min or 21 mL/min
              2500 W = 131 mL/min or 26 mL/min
              3000 W = 157 mL/min or 32 mL/min
              3500 W = 183 mL/min or 36 mL/min
              4000 W = 209 mL/min or 42 mL/min

              Its the column height that will determine the purity.  Again, based on
              personal experience, stainless steel scouring pads, if run with a RR=4 give
              an HETP of around 12 cm.  Marbles are more like HETP=33cm, or raschig rings
              give around 24cm.

              So for scrubbers & a 10% wash, the following purities should be somewhat
              indicative...

              1 HETP = 12cm = 53%
              2 HETP = 24cm = 80%
              3 HETP = 36cm = 87%
              4 HETP = 48cm = 90%
              5 HETP = 60cm = 92%
              6 HETP = 72cm = 92.6%
              7 HETP = 84cm = 93.3%
              8 HETP = 96cm = 93.8%
              9 HETP = 108cm = 94.2%
              10 HETP = 120cm = 94.4%

              Note though that the wash wont always be at 10% alcohol.  You also want the
              column to work well when the pot is almost empty ...  The following are for
              scrubbers and a 1% wash ...

              1 HETP = 12cm = 9%
              2 HETP = 24cm = 51%
              3 HETP = 36cm = 80%
              4 HETP = 48cm = 87%
              5 HETP = 60cm = 90%
              6 HETP = 72cm = 91.6%
              7 HETP = 84cm = 92.6%
              8 HETP = 96cm = 93.3%
              9 HETP = 108cm = 93.8%
              10 HETP = 120cm = 94.1%

              This is why very short columns struggle to keep their purity during the run,
              unlike taller ones.

              So Mike, use these to get a few combinations that suit you.  I'd suggest
              that you choose a narrower column, one that will suit the amount of heat
              you're planning to use.  For the height, you want at least 1m.  If you make
              it taller than necessary, you should be able to run it at a lower reflux
              ratio and collect the distillate faster.

              Tony


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            • Ackland, Tony (CALNZAS)
              ... Yeah - thats what I was trying sorta to point out (the exclamation mark !) - that a 6 inch column is no longer in the hobby realm. Most of us would
              Message 6 of 6 , Dec 27, 2001
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                >G'day Tony,surely there is a limit to how much power
                >anybody can load their electricity supply to deliver.
                >Maybe Mike has a direct line to a power station?but
                >28.5Kw. is only available to an industrial site.
                >Regards,Ken.

                Yeah - thats what I was trying sorta to point out (the exclamation mark !) -
                that a 6 inch column is no longer in the hobby realm. Most of us would
                normally be running a 10 amp fuse in our houses ? (its common here), which
                would put the upper element size more like 240V x 10 amp = 2400 W.

                Tony
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