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Re: Angels share?

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  • Harry
    ... I m in the middle of doing up a paper on plastic containers in distilling. It ll take me a while to finish. But as to your experiences with PET
    Message 1 of 62 , May 8, 2007
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...> wrote:
      >
      > Good information Harry,
      >
      > Now few more things. As an example polypropylene seems to be OK for
      > medium term STORAGE of medium strength ethanol. That's not aging but
      > storage. PET bottles I've had trouble with. I once stored some 30-40%
      > low wines temporarily (for few hours) into a thin walled pet bottle
      > and it deformed. What we need to remember here is that we are not
      > dealing exclusively with ethanol, rather flavored drinks and
      > especially low-wines have many other higher+lower boiling point
      > alcohols + other chemicals. The combined effect of all these is quite
      > impossible to determine without empirical testing.
      >
      > Cheers, Riku

       

      I'm in the middle of doing up a paper on plastic containers in distilling.  It'll take me a while to finish.  But as to your experiences with PET bottles...time & technology march on relentlessly.  The reason they've been able to use PET for beverages like Early Times & Ancient Age whiskey for the last 10 years  (and I believe Jim Beam is now using it), is because of the great advances in coating or barrier substances and processes. 

      The pet bottles of today are a far cry from those of even 3 or 4 years ago.  There's also PET bottles tailor-made for specific fills, like carbonated drinks and hot-fill juices in PET bottles that don't distort and whose contents have a shelf life requirement of longer than 9 months.

        The barrier coatings range from the organic coatings (epoxyamine aka Bairocade) developed in the mid 1990s to lengthen the shelf life of the smaller soft drink sizes in hotter climates,  then for beer, to the latest plasma-applied inorganic coatings, using carbon or silicon.

      It's a brave new world, particularly for we adventurous distillers.


      Slainte!
      regards Harry

    • tyler_97355
      I understand why you are using HDPE. I was going more for the plastics safety and flavor leeching part of the conversation. However, you did answer my
      Message 62 of 62 , May 27, 2007
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        I understand why you are using HDPE. I was going more for the
        "plastics safety" and "flavor leeching" part of the conversation.
        However, you did answer my question as to why the beverage industry
        uses PETE instead of HDPE. So uh, should I say sorry or thank you?

        -Tyler
        Well, I'm not going to lie. I love Jesus.. but I drink a little..




        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Tyler, you're missing the point. PET or PETE is used as containers
        > (bottles) by the spirits industry because it is specially formulated
        > with a barrier material (oxygen scavenger) for the purpose. IT IS
        > NOT POROUS !!!
        >
        > I (or we) are using HDPE as an alternative aging material in place
        > of barrels, because both barrels AND HDPE containers ARE POROUS !!!
        > The strength of the contents IS NEVER MORE than 70%.
        >
        > Does that clear up the confusion?
        >
        > Slainte!
        > regards Harry
        >
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