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Re: "Moonshne", the book

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  • moonshinebook
    Bob ~ Thank you for the message. The traditional press has been giving the book good reviews and, of course, that s been a relief. The food and cocktail crowd
    Message 1 of 8 , May 6, 2007
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      Bob ~

      Thank you for the message. The traditional press has been giving the
      book good reviews and, of course, that's been a relief. The food and
      cocktail crowd has been picking it up with a great deal of interest
      that has led to a lot of interviews, but I am particularly happy that
      you found it worth the time to read. And I'm humbled by the kind
      words. The book is, as much as anything, for the distillers here.

      It certainly isn't the last word in home distilling - no doubt there
      may be techniques and even ingredients that won't always jive with
      those that work quite well for some distillers - but one of my
      audiences is the curious first-timer, who knows that distilling is
      possible, but doesn't know where to turn for information. It's a
      balancing act of being broad (and engaging) enough for casual readers
      and detailed enough for those who actually want to dig deeper - links
      to this group, for instance.

      It's availability is a little sketchy for the next few weeks - It
      wasn't supposed to be out until the end of this month, but Amazon does
      have it as does, in the US, Barnes & Noble (Borders has it listed
      under an older working title the publisher wanted called "The Joy of
      Moonshine" but are still working off the end-of-the-month schedule, so
      they don't have it quite yet - just keep on 'em if they tell you they
      don't have it yet).

      ~ Matt (on the road this week)


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Robert Hubble" <zymurgybob@...> wrote:
      >
      > Last night I stayed up late and finished reading "Moonshine", by
      Matthew
      > Rowley, who, Harry tells
      > us, is a member of this list. If you are still reading the list,
      Matthew,
      > thanks for a VERY
      > enjoyable read. I loved your mix of history, lore, language, recipes,
      > technology, craft, and
      > humor, and I'd hazard a guess that you fall right in the middle of the
      > spectrum for members of
      > this list (whether you like it or not!). I thought you treated our
      art/craft
      > with the respect due
      > it, and recognized the quality our hobby is capable of.
      >
      > In spite of all that, it was just a book, albeit an entertaining and
      > informative one, until you
      > got to the part describing the distiller's relationship with his
      homebrew
      > supplier, and at that
      > point I KNEW that YOU knew exactly what I was doing, and how I was
      doing it.
      > From that point on, the book became very personal to me, and I became
      > personally involved in what you wrote from that point on.
      >
      > I was fascinated by the part where you showed in great detail the
      building
      > of a smallish
      > sheet-copper potstill, in what I associate with the classic Appalachian
      > design. I've seen a
      > thousand pictures of these stills, but I never knew how they were
      built,
      > until now. I'm torn
      > between owning a still that positively radiates its still-ness in
      glowing
      > copper, and my current
      > working tool that most would not recognize as a still, or even as
      copper,
      > probably. Mostly, I
      > figure if no-one can tell it's a still, I'm safe for a little while
      longer,
      > but someday I'd love
      > to build your still.
      >
      > Unlike so much of what is written about our craft, your book was shot
      > through with bits of
      > insight that non-stillers probably overlook, but that told me that
      either
      > your research was
      > incredible, or that you had personally boiled and condensed a bit of
      EtOH in
      > your time. For
      > instance, I was quite surprised to learn that the classic moonshiner,
      > running the classic still
      > you describe in construction, heated, observed, and probably stirred
      the
      > contents of the cooker until the boil began to "smile", and then the
      cap was
      > installed and sealed with flour paste.
      >
      > I've never even considered applying heat until the still was all
      closed up
      > and ready to go.
      >
      > Anyway, thanks for the book, and for the respect shown us, and for the
      > recipes, and the humor, and insight that comes from depth of
      knowledge. And
      > thanks for the craft of the writing itself; I've ground out a few
      cords of
      > text in my lifetime, and I hope I recognize the difference between
      "just
      > words" and a very nicely turned phrase. Thanks for the prose.
      >
      > Just for the record, guys, no money has changed hands, and I have never
      > spoken with Matthew Rowley, but I surely do recommend reading his book.
      >
      >
      >
      > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
      >
      > _________________________________________________________________
      > Get a FREE Web site, company branded e-mail and more from Microsoft
      Office
      > Live! http://clk.atdmt.com/MRT/go/mcrssaub0050001411mrt/direct/01/
      >
    • Brian B.
      Hi Matt, I bought the book from Amazon UK and I ve had it for about 3 weeks now. I must have been one of the first to get it. A very enjoyable book and just
      Message 2 of 8 , May 6, 2007
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        Hi Matt,
         
         I bought the book from Amazon UK and I've had it for about 3 weeks now. I
        must have been one of the first to get it.
         A very enjoyable book and just yesterday I started a batch of Beginners' Corn Whiskey
         and it's happily bubbling away in the outhouse.
         
        Over and Out,
          Brian.
         
        ----- Original Message -----
         
        .
        Bob ~

        Thank you for the message. The traditional press has been giving the
        book good reviews and, of course, that's been a relief. The food and
        cocktail crowd has been picking it up with a great deal of interest
        that has led to a lot of interviews, but I am particularly happy that
        you found it worth the time to read. And I'm humbled by the kind
        words. The book is, as much as anything, for the distillers here.

        It certainly isn't the last word in home distilling - no doubt there
        may be techniques and even ingredients that won't always jive with
        those that work quite well for some distillers - but one of my
        audiences is the curious first-timer, who knows that distilling is
        possible, but doesn't know where to turn for information. It's a
        balancing act of being broad (and engaging) enough for casual readers
        and detailed enough for those who actually want to dig deeper - links
        to this group, for instance.

        It's availability is a little sketchy for the next few weeks - It
        wasn't supposed to be out until the end of this month, but Amazon does
        have it as does, in the US, Barnes & Noble (Borders has it listed
        under an older working title the publisher wanted called "The Joy of
        Moonshine" but are still working off the end-of-the-month schedule, so
        they don't have it quite yet - just keep on 'em if they tell you they
        don't have it yet).

        ~ Matt (on the road this week)

      • Peggy
        In moonshine country they call such structures out buildings or sheds, and reserve outhouse for more private use. Peggy ... From: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        Message 3 of 8 , May 6, 2007
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          In moonshine country they call such structures out buildings or sheds, and reserve ‘outhouse’ for more private use.

           

          Peggy

           

          -----Original Message-----
          From: Distillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Distillers@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of Brian B.
          Sent:
          Sunday, May 06, 2007 11:18 AM
          To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          Subject: Re: [Distillers] Re: "Moonshne", the book

           

          Hi Matt,

           

           I bought the book from Amazon UK and I've had it for about 3 weeks now. I

          must have been one of the first to get it.

           A very enjoyable book and just yesterday I started a batch of Beginners' Corn Whiskey

           and it's happily bubbling away in the outhouse.

           

          Over and Out,

            Brian.

           

          ----- Original Message -----

           

          .

          Bob ~

          Thank you for the message. The traditional press has been giving the
          book good reviews and, of course, that's been a relief. The food and
          cocktail crowd has been picking it up with a great deal of interest
          that has led to a lot of interviews, but I am particularly happy that
          you found it worth the time to read. And I'm humbled by the kind
          words. The book is, as much as anything, for the distillers here.

          It certainly isn't the last word in home distilling - no doubt there
          may be techniques and even ingredients that won't always jive with
          those that work quite well for some distillers - but one of my
          audiences is the curious first-timer, who knows that distilling is
          possible, but doesn't know where to turn for information. It's a
          balancing act of being broad (and engaging) enough for casual readers
          and detailed enough for those who actually want to dig deeper - links
          to this group, for instance.

          It's availability is a little sketchy for the next few weeks - It
          wasn't supposed to be out until the end of this month, but Amazon does
          have it as does, in the
          US, Barnes & Noble (Borders has it listed
          under an older working title the publisher wanted called "The Joy of
          Moonshine" but are still working off the end-of-the-month schedule, so
          they don't have it quite yet - just keep on 'em if they tell you they
          don't have it yet).

          ~ Matt (on the road this week)


        • Brian B.
          Ah yes, also known as Grannies Greenhouse or TheThunderbox !. My outhouse was originally used to store coal. Brian B. ... From: Peggy Recent Activity a..
          Message 4 of 8 , May 6, 2007
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            Ah yes, also known as Grannies' Greenhouse or TheThunderbox !. My outhouse was originally used to store coal.
             
            Brian B.
             
            ----- Original Message -----
            From: Peggy
             
            .

            In moonshine country they call such structures out buildings or sheds, and reserve ‘outhouse’ for more private use.

             

            Peggy


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