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Re: Angels share?

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  • abbababbaccc
    Than you Harry, extremely usefull info and actually quite amazing. It seems to indicate that over 12 years of storage one would loose 24% of the original
    Message 1 of 62 , May 3, 2007
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      Than you Harry, extremely usefull info and actually quite amazing. It
      seems to indicate that over 12 years of storage one would loose 24%
      of the original amount!!!

      Now let me explain my plans so you may comment. I have a high
      capacity aquarium airpump (250 l/h) that has connection for air in
      and air out. My plan is to use this to aerate the whiskey with oak
      shavings, it gives a nice almost boiling like action to a gallon jar.
      The catch here is that while i push air to jar I also evacuate it at
      the same time using the other connection - i.e. air is circulated.
      The other new thing is that I plan to use another gallon (or bigger)
      jar as a ctach can. That means I will connect it to the return line
      of the air pump. In practise some alcohol gets carried away by the
      air stream (angels share) and it will end up in the catch can. The
      catch can will also provide extra oxygen to the system

      The plan is to run this system to oxygenate the whiskey untill
      enough "angels share" has been collected to the catch can to present
      certain number of years of maturation.

      So, any thoughts of whether this will work or not?

      Cheers, Riku


      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
      >
      > According to most info I've seen, the accepted standard in the
      > industry averages out at around 2% per year over a 4 or more year
      > span. But those figures are for Scotland, Ireland, Canada & like
      cool
      > wet climate places.
      >
      > I did see a reference once about US being somewhat more, but that
      was
      > because of the higher temps & drier climate. IIRC, that particular
      > bit of info said...
      > "6 to 8% the first year, thereafter 2 to 3%". I believe the higher
      > first year loss was really referring to the amount lost to wood
      > soakage. The following will explain this more.
      >
      > The US uses new wood (Quercus alba) and has sawn staves. This oak
      > species is higher in tyloses than other oaks. These seal the
      porous
      > tubes via swelling when wet, so on first fill, they draw more
      liquid
      > than other oak types. Don't be fooled into thinking that because
      they
      > are first water-sealed that the spirit losses will be minimal.
      > Remember that spirit and water are like magnets to each other
      > (miscible in all proportions) therefore when you fill it with
      spirit,
      > the water in the wood will attract and mix with the spirit, drawing
      it
      > in also.
      >
      > Most other places use once-filled wood (Q.alba) and the swollen
      > tyloses have already sealed it. The more porous French oaks
      (Q.robur,
      > Q.patraea) are not sawn but hand-split along the grain to minimise
      the
      > porosity. Therefore they don't require as much spirit soakage, but
      > the different manufacturing process also makes them more
      expensive.
      > The split timber process recovers much less usable wood per given
      log
      > size compared to the US sawn process.
      >
      > Probably much more info than you wanted, but it does answer your
      > question. :)
      >
      >
      > Slainte!
      > regards Harry
      >
    • tyler_97355
      I understand why you are using HDPE. I was going more for the plastics safety and flavor leeching part of the conversation. However, you did answer my
      Message 62 of 62 , May 27, 2007
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        I understand why you are using HDPE. I was going more for the
        "plastics safety" and "flavor leeching" part of the conversation.
        However, you did answer my question as to why the beverage industry
        uses PETE instead of HDPE. So uh, should I say sorry or thank you?

        -Tyler
        Well, I'm not going to lie. I love Jesus.. but I drink a little..




        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Tyler, you're missing the point. PET or PETE is used as containers
        > (bottles) by the spirits industry because it is specially formulated
        > with a barrier material (oxygen scavenger) for the purpose. IT IS
        > NOT POROUS !!!
        >
        > I (or we) are using HDPE as an alternative aging material in place
        > of barrels, because both barrels AND HDPE containers ARE POROUS !!!
        > The strength of the contents IS NEVER MORE than 70%.
        >
        > Does that clear up the confusion?
        >
        > Slainte!
        > regards Harry
        >
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