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Re: Angels share?

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  • Harry
    ... According to most info I ve seen, the accepted standard in the industry averages out at around 2% per year over a 4 or more year span. But those figures
    Message 1 of 62 , May 3, 2007
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "abbababbaccc" <abbababbaccc@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > Rob, I just glanced through T.P.Lyons's text about whiskey while
      > searching for the answer and he stated just the opposite. That is at
      > humid climate (as in Scotland) more alcohol evaporates and ABV
      > decreases. In dry climates the opposite happens.
      >
      > What I'd like to know is how much water + alcohol evaporates for
      > three years (or any time frame) of storage? I'm just finishing some
      > low wines and I need to know this for my accelarated oxygenation
      > plans :)
      >
      > Cheers, Riku



      According to most info I've seen, the accepted standard in the
      industry averages out at around 2% per year over a 4 or more year
      span. But those figures are for Scotland, Ireland, Canada & like cool
      wet climate places.

      I did see a reference once about US being somewhat more, but that was
      because of the higher temps & drier climate. IIRC, that particular
      bit of info said...
      "6 to 8% the first year, thereafter 2 to 3%". I believe the higher
      first year loss was really referring to the amount lost to wood
      soakage. The following will explain this more.

      The US uses new wood (Quercus alba) and has sawn staves. This oak
      species is higher in tyloses than other oaks. These seal the porous
      tubes via swelling when wet, so on first fill, they draw more liquid
      than other oak types. Don't be fooled into thinking that because they
      are first water-sealed that the spirit losses will be minimal.
      Remember that spirit and water are like magnets to each other
      (miscible in all proportions) therefore when you fill it with spirit,
      the water in the wood will attract and mix with the spirit, drawing it
      in also.

      Most other places use once-filled wood (Q.alba) and the swollen
      tyloses have already sealed it. The more porous French oaks (Q.robur,
      Q.patraea) are not sawn but hand-split along the grain to minimise the
      porosity. Therefore they don't require as much spirit soakage, but
      the different manufacturing process also makes them more expensive.
      The split timber process recovers much less usable wood per given log
      size compared to the US sawn process.

      Probably much more info than you wanted, but it does answer your
      question. :)


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • tyler_97355
      I understand why you are using HDPE. I was going more for the plastics safety and flavor leeching part of the conversation. However, you did answer my
      Message 62 of 62 , May 27, 2007
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        I understand why you are using HDPE. I was going more for the
        "plastics safety" and "flavor leeching" part of the conversation.
        However, you did answer my question as to why the beverage industry
        uses PETE instead of HDPE. So uh, should I say sorry or thank you?

        -Tyler
        Well, I'm not going to lie. I love Jesus.. but I drink a little..




        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Tyler, you're missing the point. PET or PETE is used as containers
        > (bottles) by the spirits industry because it is specially formulated
        > with a barrier material (oxygen scavenger) for the purpose. IT IS
        > NOT POROUS !!!
        >
        > I (or we) are using HDPE as an alternative aging material in place
        > of barrels, because both barrels AND HDPE containers ARE POROUS !!!
        > The strength of the contents IS NEVER MORE than 70%.
        >
        > Does that clear up the confusion?
        >
        > Slainte!
        > regards Harry
        >
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