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Carbohydrates remaining after fermentation - BADLY off-topic

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  • Robert Hubble
    I understand this question is off-topic, but I can t imagine a group better prepared to answer it. I am a brewer (mostly allgrain) and a diabetic. I control
    Message 1 of 3 , Mar 2, 2007
      I understand this question is off-topic, but I can't imagine a group better
      prepared to answer it.

      I am a brewer (mostly allgrain) and a diabetic. I control the diabetes
      pretty well, with testing, diet, and exercise, but I don't control my
      brewing at all :). I know I should drink beer moderately, nominally because
      of the carbohydrate content of the beer, but I got thinking (always
      dangerous).

      After mashing, I test with iodine for unconverted starch, and do not find
      any. I then pitch my yeast to convert all (I think) of those sugars to
      alcohol. In that light, what carbohydates can exist for me to avoid? What
      the hell are the nutritionists talking about?

      Does anyone know what carbohydates I shold be worrying about?

      Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller

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    • pint_o_shine
      Malto-dextrin is one of the sugars I know of that remains after mashing and fermenting. It gives that desired mouth feel. This is the stuff the low carb beers
      Message 2 of 3 , Mar 2, 2007
        Malto-dextrin is one of the sugars I know of that remains after
        mashing and fermenting. It gives that desired mouth feel. This is the
        stuff the low carb beers are missing. They use a glucosidase enzyme to
        convert it to glucose before the fermentation. It is the same sugar
        that artificial coffee creamer is made of. I am sure there are other
        complex sugars left but this is the only one I know of that we can
        digest to glucose.
      • Robert Hubble
        Thanks pint, That s exactly what I was looking for. I didn t know that malto-dextring was a sugar (the name threw me off), or that it digested to glucose. I
        Message 3 of 3 , Mar 3, 2007
          Thanks pint,

          That's exactly what I was looking for. I didn't know that malto-dextring was
          a sugar (the name threw me off), or that it digested to glucose.

          I KNEW this was the right group.



          Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller





          >From: "pint_o_shine" <pintoshine@...>
          >Reply-To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          >To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
          >Subject: [Distillers] Re: Carbohydrates remaining after fermentation -
          >BADLY off-topic
          >Date: Fri, 02 Mar 2007 21:01:15 -0000
          >
          >Malto-dextrin is one of the sugars I know of that remains after
          >mashing and fermenting. It gives that desired mouth feel. This is the
          >stuff the low carb beers are missing. They use a glucosidase enzyme to
          >convert it to glucose before the fermentation. It is the same sugar
          >that artificial coffee creamer is made of. I am sure there are other
          >complex sugars left but this is the only one I know of that we can
          >digest to glucose.
          >

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