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Re: Brandy help

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  • miciofelice2003
    Ciao. Normally an acetic smell is due to a no perfect separation of heads, particularly in the range between 75 °C - 77.5 °C. I this zone there is
    Message 1 of 3 , Dec 22, 2006
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      Ciao.

      Normally an acetic smell is due to a no perfect separation of heads,
      particularly in the range between 75 °C - 77.5 °C.

      I this zone there is ethyl-acetate (acetato di etile, i my language)
      and acethaldeid.

      This is the main difference between wine and alcohool: alcohol has
      already separated heads and tails, wine not.

      So, try to de-distill carefully your brandy, paying a lot of attention
      to separate heads.

      Merry Christmas to you and to the forum.

      Micio felice





      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "fellwarrior" <fellwarrior@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I'm trying to make some brandy from commercially purchased wine. I'm
      > using a copper alambic type still. When I make it I always get a
      > slight to strong vinegar-like smell and off flavor. I'm trying to
      make
      > a strongly a brandy that still has a strong grape/wine flavor. Is
      > there a way to avoid this? I've had great success making many
      > different flavored types of liquors (gin, a Benedictine copy, coffee
      > schnapps)macerated and redistilled from neutral grain alcohol. (I'll
      > also post this on the regular New Distillers group) Any help would be
      > greatly appreciated.
      >
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