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Re: Beer wort vs Malt & Grain Whisky worts

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  • hitman0forhire
    ... Nice article...Interesting info...excuse me for digging around in the archives...
    Message 1 of 2 , Dec 3, 2006
      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
      >
      >
      >
      > Differences Between Scotch WhiskyProduction and Brewing
      >
      > by
      >
      > Graham G. Stewart
      >
      > International Centre for Brewing and Distilling, Heriot-Watt University
      >
      >
      >
      > The production of Scotch whisky is very closely regulated through the
      > Scotch
      >
      > Whisky Act 1988. In terms of the regulatory philosophy, this is
      >
      > very similar to the German Purity Beer Law, which dates from
      >
      > 1519 (6) and still closely regulates all of the beer produced in
      >
      > Germany and a number of other central European countries.
      >
      >
      >
      > In terms of process, malt and grain spirit products are
      >
      > mashed, fermented, distilled, and matured separately, whereas,
      >
      > in brewing, malt and adjuncts are usually processed together to
      >
      > produce a single wort. In Scotch whisky production, higher diastatic-
      >
      > power malts are employed than in brewing in order to
      >
      > enhance starch hydrolysis. Extract, attenuation, and carbohydrate-
      >
      > to-alcohol efficiencies are critical. The wort, prior to fermentation,
      >
      > is unboiled with no trub removal of the cold break.
      >
      > As a consequence, this wort is not sterile and contains contaminating
      >
      > bacteria, wild yeasts, and mycelial fungi (1). Although
      >
      > spent grains are removed from the malt wort, they are
      >
      > not removed from the grain wort. Hops are not employed in
      >
      > the production of spirit wort.
      >
      >
      >
      > Generally, only strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ale
      >
      > type) are employed for the fermentation of whisky worts. This
      >
      > includes spent brewers' yeast and "special" strains of yeast
      > that
      >
      > can metabolize small dextrins (maltotetraose, maltopentaose,
      >
      > etc.). Fermentation is conducted at higher temperatures (28–
      >
      > 32°C) than brewing and in different geometry fermenters. The
      >
      > yeast is only used once, it is not recycled. At the end of fermentation,
      >
      > the fermented wort plus yeast goes directly into the
      >
      > batch (malt) or continuous (grain) still.
      >
      >
      >
      > The fermented wort (it is also called wash) is distilled and a
      >
      > plethora of flavor congeners result in the distillate. The presence
      >
      > of copper in the still is critical. The copper reacts with
      >
      > unwanted sulfur compounds to produce an insoluble sulfide
      >
      > precipitate, which is removed. The distillate is matured in oak
      >
      > casks for a minimum of 3 years. Similar to brewing,
      >
      > the matured distillate is diluted to an agreed alcohol specification.
      >
      > The final whisky is more stable than beer. There is
      >
      > minimal dissolved oxygen, light, foam, or microbiological stability
      >
      > problems, but haze formation can be a problem.
      >
      >
      >
      > [Source: MBAA TQ vol. 42, no. 4 • 2005 • pp. 305–308]
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > Slainte!
      >
      > regards Harry
      >

      Nice article...Interesting info...excuse me for digging around in the
      archives...
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