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Prunelle de Bourgogne

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  • waljaco
    This particular commercial liqueur only uses the skinned and dried sloe (prunelle) kernels. Possibly they are a by-product of jam making? It comes in 25%abv
    Message 1 of 5 , Nov 13, 2006
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      This particular commercial liqueur only uses the skinned and dried
      sloe (prunelle) kernels. Possibly they are a by-product of jam making?
      It comes in 25%abv ane 40%abv -


      http://www.briottet.com/boutique

      wal
    • PhilipWilson
      Yes, that s right. It s made only from the kernels. It doesn t have any of the fruit flavor from the flesh or skin of the sloe, only an aromatic
      Message 2 of 5 , Nov 14, 2006
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        Yes, that's right. It's made only from the kernels. It doesn't have any of the fruit flavor
        from the flesh or skin of the sloe, only an aromatic almond/amaretto like flavor. Now,
        there are other French liqueurs called prunelle which are made from the whole fruit; they
        are deep reddish purple, as you would expect. So the nomenclature is confusing.

        After a week of soaking, my test batch is a sort of dirty light-caramel color. Which leads
        me to suspect that the commercial French product is redistilled after the kernel
        masceration. I'm going to try a bigger batch, crush some of the kernels first, and redistil.

        Part of the reason this is interesting for me is that I'm already making liqueur from neutral
        spirits and several kilos of sloe berries. I't seems possible that the kernels will retain
        enough aroma after the fruit masceration is finished to be worth recycling into prunelle.

        I got started on this track by accident. I made a damson plum liqueur in Sept., and for
        some reason put the extracted fruit aside rather than composting or eating it. Several
        weeks later, I sampled it, and it had taken on an amaretto-like flavor. When I was in
        Burgundy and found prunelle, I initially assumed it was from damsons.

        Anyway, I have some experiments to try, and I shall report back. Thanks, Wal, for the
        recipes and links.

        Phil



        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
        >
        > This particular commercial liqueur only uses the skinned and dried
        > sloe (prunelle) kernels. Possibly they are a by-product of jam making?
        > It comes in 25%abv ane 40%abv -
        >
        >
        > http://www.briottet.com/boutique
        >
        > wal
        >
      • waljaco
        The dirty colour comes from the skin. You need to do the same as for almonds - soak in hot water, remove skins then dry. Look for a liqueur de noyaux recipe
        Message 3 of 5 , Nov 14, 2006
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          The dirty colour comes from the skin. You need to do the same as for
          almonds - soak in hot water, remove skins then dry. Look for a
          'liqueur de noyaux' recipe - generally not redistilled although bitter
          almonds are used as botanical in some gins.
          Actually apricot kernels are easier to work with.
          wal
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "PhilipWilson" <pgw@...> wrote:
          >
          > Yes, that's right. It's made only from the kernels. It doesn't
          have any of the fruit flavor
          > from the flesh or skin of the sloe, only an aromatic almond/amaretto
          like flavor. Now,
          > there are other French liqueurs called prunelle which are made from
          the whole fruit; they
          > are deep reddish purple, as you would expect. So the nomenclature
          is confusing.
          >
          > After a week of soaking, my test batch is a sort of dirty
          light-caramel color. Which leads
          > me to suspect that the commercial French product is redistilled
          after the kernel
          > masceration. I'm going to try a bigger batch, crush some of the
          kernels first, and redistil.
          >
          > Part of the reason this is interesting for me is that I'm already
          making liqueur from neutral
          > spirits and several kilos of sloe berries. I't seems possible
          that the kernels will retain
          > enough aroma after the fruit masceration is finished to be worth
          recycling into prunelle.
          >
          > I got started on this track by accident. I made a damson plum
          liqueur in Sept., and for
          > some reason put the extracted fruit aside rather than composting or
          eating it. Several
          > weeks later, I sampled it, and it had taken on an amaretto-like
          flavor. When I was in
          > Burgundy and found prunelle, I initially assumed it was from damsons.
          >
          > Anyway, I have some experiments to try, and I shall report back.
          Thanks, Wal, for the
          > recipes and links.
          >
          > Phil
          >
          >
          >
          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@> wrote:
          > >
          > > This particular commercial liqueur only uses the skinned and dried
          > > sloe (prunelle) kernels. Possibly they are a by-product of jam making?
          > > It comes in 25%abv ane 40%abv -
          > >
          > >
          > > http://www.briottet.com/boutique
          > >
          > > wal
          > >
          >
        • waljaco
          Prunelle de Bourgogne only uses the sloe kernels and thus is in effect similar to Amaretto - http://tinyurl.com/23u3yov wal
          Message 4 of 5 , Sep 16, 2010
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            Prunelle de Bourgogne only uses the sloe kernels and thus is in effect similar to Amaretto -

            http://tinyurl.com/23u3yov

            wal
          • miciofelice2003
            Ciao a tutti. It s true, they use kernels, as I read here: http://www.aujardin.org/recette-liqueur-prunelle-bourgogne-vraie-t117951.html But on Wikipedia (
            Message 5 of 5 , Sep 16, 2010
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              Ciao a tutti.

              It's true, they use kernels, as I read here:

              http://www.aujardin.org/recette-liqueur-prunelle-bourgogne-vraie-t117951.html

              But on Wikipedia ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Prunelle ) I read this:
              "Prunelle is the French word for the fruit of the Blackthorn shrub, (Prunus spinosa), known as a sloe. It is too sour to eat but is used in jams and jellies.

              From it a dark acid plum-flavored liqueur of the same name is produced in Italy and France. It is sometimes labelled as Prunelle de Bourgogne and has an alcohol content of 30ยบ proof (15%). It is also used in Britain to make sloe gin, an infusion of sloe berries in gin with sugar added."" and so I thought that in France they use the fruits.
              Sorry for the mistake.

              ciao a tutti

              micio felice







              --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "waljaco" <waljaco@...> wrote:
              >
              > Prunelle de Bourgogne only uses the sloe kernels and thus is in effect similar to Amaretto -
              >
              > http://tinyurl.com/23u3yov
              >
              > wal
              >
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