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Beer wort vs Malt & Grain Whisky worts

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  • Harry
    Differences Between Scotch WhiskyProduction and Brewing by Graham G. Stewart International Centre for Brewing and Distilling, Heriot-Watt University The
    Message 1 of 2 , Nov 3, 2006
    • 0 Attachment

       

      Differences Between Scotch WhiskyProduction and Brewing

      by

      Graham G. Stewart

      International Centre for Brewing and Distilling, Heriot-Watt University

       

      The production of Scotch whisky is very closely regulated through the Scotch

      Whisky Act 1988. In terms of the regulatory philosophy, this is

      very similar to the German Purity Beer Law, which dates from

      1519 (6) and still closely regulates all of the beer produced in

      Germany and a number of other central European countries.

       

      In terms of process, malt and grain spirit products are

      mashed, fermented, distilled, and matured separately, whereas,

      in brewing, malt and adjuncts are usually processed together to

      produce a single wort. In Scotch whisky production, higher diastatic-

      power malts are employed than in brewing in order to

      enhance starch hydrolysis. Extract, attenuation, and carbohydrate-

      to-alcohol efficiencies are critical. The wort, prior to fermentation,

      is unboiled with no trub removal of the cold break.

      As a consequence, this wort is not sterile and contains contaminating

      bacteria, wild yeasts, and mycelial fungi (1). Although

      spent grains are removed from the malt wort, they are

      not removed from the grain wort. Hops are not employed in

      the production of spirit wort.

       

      Generally, only strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ale

      type) are employed for the fermentation of whisky worts. This

      includes spent brewers' yeast and "special" strains of yeast that

      can metabolize small dextrins (maltotetraose, maltopentaose,

      etc.). Fermentation is conducted at higher temperatures (28–

      32°C) than brewing and in different geometry fermenters. The

      yeast is only used once, it is not recycled. At the end of fermentation,

      the fermented wort plus yeast goes directly into the

      batch (malt) or continuous (grain) still.

       

      The fermented wort (it is also called wash) is distilled and a

      plethora of flavor congeners result in the distillate. The presence

      of copper in the still is critical. The copper reacts with

      unwanted sulfur compounds to produce an insoluble sulfide

      precipitate, which is removed. The distillate is matured in oak

      casks for a minimum of 3 years. Similar to brewing,

      the matured distillate is diluted to an agreed alcohol specification.

      The final whisky is more stable than beer. There is

      minimal dissolved oxygen, light, foam, or microbiological stability

      problems, but haze formation can be a problem.

       

      [Source:  MBAA TQ vol. 42, no. 4 • 2005 • pp. 305–308]

       

       

      Slainte!

      regards Harry

    • hitman0forhire
      ... Nice article...Interesting info...excuse me for digging around in the archives...
      Message 2 of 2 , Dec 3, 2006
      • 0 Attachment
        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Harry" <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
        >
        >
        >
        > Differences Between Scotch WhiskyProduction and Brewing
        >
        > by
        >
        > Graham G. Stewart
        >
        > International Centre for Brewing and Distilling, Heriot-Watt University
        >
        >
        >
        > The production of Scotch whisky is very closely regulated through the
        > Scotch
        >
        > Whisky Act 1988. In terms of the regulatory philosophy, this is
        >
        > very similar to the German Purity Beer Law, which dates from
        >
        > 1519 (6) and still closely regulates all of the beer produced in
        >
        > Germany and a number of other central European countries.
        >
        >
        >
        > In terms of process, malt and grain spirit products are
        >
        > mashed, fermented, distilled, and matured separately, whereas,
        >
        > in brewing, malt and adjuncts are usually processed together to
        >
        > produce a single wort. In Scotch whisky production, higher diastatic-
        >
        > power malts are employed than in brewing in order to
        >
        > enhance starch hydrolysis. Extract, attenuation, and carbohydrate-
        >
        > to-alcohol efficiencies are critical. The wort, prior to fermentation,
        >
        > is unboiled with no trub removal of the cold break.
        >
        > As a consequence, this wort is not sterile and contains contaminating
        >
        > bacteria, wild yeasts, and mycelial fungi (1). Although
        >
        > spent grains are removed from the malt wort, they are
        >
        > not removed from the grain wort. Hops are not employed in
        >
        > the production of spirit wort.
        >
        >
        >
        > Generally, only strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (ale
        >
        > type) are employed for the fermentation of whisky worts. This
        >
        > includes spent brewers' yeast and "special" strains of yeast
        > that
        >
        > can metabolize small dextrins (maltotetraose, maltopentaose,
        >
        > etc.). Fermentation is conducted at higher temperatures (28–
        >
        > 32°C) than brewing and in different geometry fermenters. The
        >
        > yeast is only used once, it is not recycled. At the end of fermentation,
        >
        > the fermented wort plus yeast goes directly into the
        >
        > batch (malt) or continuous (grain) still.
        >
        >
        >
        > The fermented wort (it is also called wash) is distilled and a
        >
        > plethora of flavor congeners result in the distillate. The presence
        >
        > of copper in the still is critical. The copper reacts with
        >
        > unwanted sulfur compounds to produce an insoluble sulfide
        >
        > precipitate, which is removed. The distillate is matured in oak
        >
        > casks for a minimum of 3 years. Similar to brewing,
        >
        > the matured distillate is diluted to an agreed alcohol specification.
        >
        > The final whisky is more stable than beer. There is
        >
        > minimal dissolved oxygen, light, foam, or microbiological stability
        >
        > problems, but haze formation can be a problem.
        >
        >
        >
        > [Source: MBAA TQ vol. 42, no. 4 • 2005 • pp. 305–308]
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Slainte!
        >
        > regards Harry
        >

        Nice article...Interesting info...excuse me for digging around in the
        archives...
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