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Old style rum wash

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  • waljaco
    For an old style rum wash we require in non-centrifugal sugars and molasses that retain all their constituents except water. These sugars go by many different
    Message 1 of 1 , Oct 8, 2006
      For an old style rum wash we require in non-centrifugal sugars and
      molasses that retain all their constituents except water. These sugars
      go by many different names - In India they are called gur and jaggery.
      In South America they are called piloncillo, panocha, panela, papelón,
      chancaca, raspadura. The molasses is not centrifuged off the
      crystallised sugar but drains off it. It appears that this molasses
      has a sugar content of 70% compared to modern blackstrap molasses
      which has had more sugar extracted, leaving a product with some 50%
      sugars which cannot be recovered economically. The moisture content of
      both is about 25%.
      Here is an 18th century CE description of the manufacture of raw sugar
      from sugarcane juice in Georgia (U.S.A.) from "Sugar and Tabby" by
      Thomas H. Eubanks.
      "The manufacture of raw sugar from cane juice requires 4 major steps.
      First, the cane is crushed or ground by pressing it between the
      rollers of a sugar mill. This milling process separates the sweet
      juice from the rind. Second, the juice is clarified to remove dirt and
      other impurities. Third, the clarified juice is then boiled to
      evaporate its water content. The evaporation process is contined until
      the juice becomes a thick syrup. Finally, when the syrup begins to
      granulate, it is transferred from the boiling kettle to hogsheads or
      other containers known as sugarmoulds where the thick syrup will
      crystallise into raw sugar. Any syrup remaining in the containers
      after crystallisation is then drained off. This syrup (molasses) is
      sold in that form or reserved for distillation into liquor (rum)."



      COMPOSITION OF SUGARCANE JUICE
      Sugars 11-16% (average 13%), Moisture 70-75%

      COMPOSITION OF SUGARS
      (http://food.oregonstate.edu/sugar/comp.html)
      Molasses, cane: Barbados - Sugars 70%, Moisture 24%

      S.G. of molasses 1.4-1.5 (average 1.43)

      Dark Muscovado (or Barbados)Sugar - Sugars 90%, Moisture 4%
      Light Muscovado Sugar - Sugars 96%, Moisture 1.5%

      If we want to mix white sugar and blackstrap molasses to make a 70%
      sugar content molasses similar to that of 18th century Barbados
      molasses, we can use the Pearson Square to find the right proportion.
      (see msg 4986 for details)

      To make a molasses with a 70% sugar content, we need 1.5 parts of
      blackstrap molasses (50% sugars) and 1 part of white sugar (100% sugar).
      For a 10%abv wash we would need 600 g of blackstrap molasses and 400 g
      of white sugar/4 litres (1 U.S. gallon) of water. This should
      correspond to a 18th century rum wash. (The 24% water content of the
      blackstrap molasses has been ignored).

      A dark muscovado sugar (also called Barbados sugar) is similar to
      panela or jaggery or even Barbados molasses, and therefore can be used
      to make an old style rum wash.
      For a 10%abv wash we sould ned 700 g of dark muscovado sugar/4litres
      (1 U.S. gallon) of water. For a 15%abv wash we need 1 kg/4l.

      wal
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