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RE: [Distillers] Wood Chips

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  • Anthony Athawes
    Congratulations on your experimentation! That s what it should all be about. Your result with Pecan were interesting and surprising. I m afraid we don t get
    Message 1 of 13 , Sep 4, 2006
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      Congratulations on your experimentation! That's what it should all be about.

      Your result with Pecan were interesting and surprising. I'm afraid we don't
      get exotic trees like that here in England. You didn't mention Horse
      Chestnut - they are one of our most common trees. Oak isn't too far away and
      that will be my first trial.

      But surely charring any of these woods would have some affect?

      Tony

      -----Original Message-----
      From: Distillers@yahoogroups.com [mailto:Distillers@yahoogroups.com]On
      Behalf Of link2d
      Sent: 04 September 2006 15:37
      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      Subject: [Distillers] Wood Chips

      Wood Experiment

      The premise for this wood experiment is that I use woods for
      grilling and slow cook (BBQing). I have a feel (taste) for the
      transfer of smoked flavors into meats. I was wondering of the
      ability to transfer flavors into spirits of the same wood. The
      primary woods that I use are Hickory for grilling, Cherry, Lemon/
      Orange, Maple, and Pecan for slow cooking. I've added Live Oak,
      which is used in the fire place, to the mix for kicks and grins.
      Wood was freshly chipped from logs from the wood pile. Although the
      chips/splinters would be immersed in alcohol they were soaked in
      sodium metabisulphite solution. Chips used were not toasted or
      charred. That is the next phase of testing.
      A 19% ABV sugar wash was run though a 36" column with copper mesh
      packing. It ran off at 95%. The alcohol was diluted to 45% using
      distilled water. Filtering was not necessary but for the sake of
      this experiment it was run though Prestige Stone Carbon (activated
      0.4 - 0.85 mm). The intent is for completely neutral spirit.

      Approximately 2 TBS were used per 1 Quart of 45% spirit. I
      typically use that amount of chips for 1 gallon.
      First week testing: Pictures are available. See Photos, `Woods
      Chips'
      1. Cherry Wood- Light caramel color with a reddish hue. The wood
      flavor is very mild with a slight sweet aftertaste. I do not
      perceive tannin transfer or very slight. This may develop over time.
      2. Maple- Some color transfer. More of a tint, not `water white'.
      Wood flavor almost not existent at this point. Some sweetness was
      present. No tannin perceived to have been transferred. The least
      flavor noted.
      3. Lemon/Orange- (Both woods are intermingled on the wood pile. I
      am not able to tell the difference by appearance.) Color is a yellow
      hue. Slight fruit flavor (not citrus) transferred with a good finish
      that lingers. I think that this has promise as a stand alone
      flavoring but doubt that it will greatly influence other flavors if
      commingled.
      4. Pecan- This is my greatest surprise. Caramel color. Strong
      pecan nut flavor as if sipping sweet pecan juice. Almost comes across
      as an aperitif. Tannin feel on the tongue is noted. I think that
      this has the best promise for blending. And this is just the first
      week.
      5. Live Oak- Caramel color. Strong sweet wood flavor. Typical oak
      tannin perceived.
      6. Hickory- Light caramel color. Very slight nutty flavor. Light
      tannin perceived. This may develop over time.


      Don't hesitate with comments, questions, or suggestions. (like this
      group would hesitate)


      Link







      Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
      FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org
      Yahoo! Groups Links
    • Link D'Antoni
      Tony, Yes, I intend charring and will report on that also. I m grilling today as it is Labor Day in the US. I have chips set asside to char when the grill
      Message 2 of 13 , Sep 4, 2006
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        Tony,

        Yes, I intend charring and will report on that also.
        I'm grilling today as it is 'Labor Day' in the US. I
        have chips set asside to char when the grill it lit
        today. (Ribeyes lightly seasoned and sweet potato over
        hickory. Tossed salad with balsamic vinegar & extra
        virgin olive oil vinegarette dressing. A chilled
        medium plum wine.)
        The ongoing trials will be reported of 1st week, 2nd
        week, 1st 2nd and 3rd Month, then quartly up to the
        year...
        I have someone whose taste buds are more discerning
        than mine to give evaluation. I will report his
        findings.
        I think that some of this will translate to my wines
        as well. I don't brew beer but I'm sure the fruit and
        nut woods might do for that.

        Link


        --- Anthony Athawes <Anthony.Athawes@...>
        wrote:

        > Congratulations on your experimentation! That's what
        > it should all be about.
        >
        > Your result with Pecan were interesting and
        > surprising. I'm afraid we don't
        > get exotic trees like that here in England. You
        > didn't mention Horse
        > Chestnut - they are one of our most common trees.
        > Oak isn't too far away and
        > that will be my first trial.
        >
        > But surely charring any of these woods would have
        > some affect?
        >
        > Tony
        >
        > -----Original Message-----
        > From: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > [mailto:Distillers@yahoogroups.com]On
        > Behalf Of link2d
        > Sent: 04 September 2006 15:37
        > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
        > Subject: [Distillers] Wood Chips
        >
        > Wood Experiment
        >
        > The premise for this wood experiment is that I use
        > woods for
        > grilling and slow cook (BBQing). I have a feel
        > (taste) for the
        > transfer of smoked flavors into meats. I was
        > wondering of the
        > ability to transfer flavors into spirits of the same
        > wood. The
        > primary woods that I use are Hickory for grilling,
        > Cherry, Lemon/
        > Orange, Maple, and Pecan for slow cooking. I've
        > added Live Oak,
        > which is used in the fire place, to the mix for
        > kicks and grins.
        > Wood was freshly chipped from logs from the wood
        > pile. Although the
        > chips/splinters would be immersed in alcohol they
        > were soaked in
        > sodium metabisulphite solution. Chips used were not
        > toasted or
        > charred. That is the next phase of testing.
        > A 19% ABV sugar wash was run though a 36" column
        > with copper mesh
        > packing. It ran off at 95%. The alcohol was
        > diluted to 45% using
        > distilled water. Filtering was not necessary but
        > for the sake of
        > this experiment it was run though Prestige Stone
        > Carbon (activated
        > 0.4 - 0.85 mm). The intent is for completely
        > neutral spirit.
        >
        > Approximately 2 TBS were used per 1 Quart of 45%
        > spirit. I
        > typically use that amount of chips for 1 gallon.
        > First week testing: Pictures are available. See
        > Photos, `Woods
        > Chips'
        > 1. Cherry Wood- Light caramel color with a reddish
        > hue. The wood
        > flavor is very mild with a slight sweet aftertaste.
        > I do not
        > perceive tannin transfer or very slight. This may
        > develop over time.
        > 2. Maple- Some color transfer. More of a tint, not
        > `water white'.
        > Wood flavor almost not existent at this point. Some
        > sweetness was
        > present. No tannin perceived to have been
        > transferred. The least
        > flavor noted.
        > 3. Lemon/Orange- (Both woods are intermingled on
        > the wood pile. I
        > am not able to tell the difference by appearance.)
        > Color is a yellow
        > hue. Slight fruit flavor (not citrus) transferred
        > with a good finish
        > that lingers. I think that this has promise as a
        > stand alone
        > flavoring but doubt that it will greatly influence
        > other flavors if
        > commingled.
        > 4. Pecan- This is my greatest surprise. Caramel
        > color. Strong
        > pecan nut flavor as if sipping sweet pecan juice.
        > Almost comes across
        > as an aperitif. Tannin feel on the tongue is
        > noted. I think that
        > this has the best promise for blending. And this is
        > just the first
        > week.
        > 5. Live Oak- Caramel color. Strong sweet wood
        > flavor. Typical oak
        > tannin perceived.
        > 6. Hickory- Light caramel color. Very slight nutty
        > flavor. Light
        > tannin perceived. This may develop over time.
        >
        >
        > Don't hesitate with comments, questions, or
        > suggestions. (like this
        > group would hesitate)
        >
        >
        > Link
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        > Distillers list archives :
        > http://archive.nnytech.net/
        > FAQ and other information at
        > http://homedistiller.org
        > Yahoo! Groups Links
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >
        >


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      • subsonic40grain
        wrote: Your result with Pecan were interesting and surprising. I m afraid we don t ... Chestnut - they are one of our most common trees.
        Message 3 of 13 , Sep 4, 2006
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          <Anthony.Athawes@...> wrote:
          Your result with Pecan were interesting and surprising. I'm afraid we
          don't
          > get exotic trees like that here in England. You didn't mention Horse
          Chestnut - they are one of our most common trees. Oak isn't too far
          away and that will be my first trial.

          ## Anthony! OMG you need a tree lesson! Aesculus Hippocastanun
          (Horse Chestnut) is good for nothing except conker fights! Stick with
          Oak for Gawds sake! P.S We do have Pecan here although rare - My tree
          bible is by Alan Mitchell, do a search on Amazon and you will find it.
          my one is ISBN 0-00-219213-6 :-)Buy it!!!

          Link - your test is bl@@dy excellent! I like the fact that you use
          neutral (like me) and age at 45%. (I age at 43% give or take). Other
          than that my sugar wash turns out fab with the right wood. Zymurgy is
          kinda making me think about grain mind....

          I am going to try a test on Sweet chestnut (Castanea sativa). My
          reasons for this are as follows. The wood has a large amount of
          tannin and is traditionally used for fencing here as it doesn't rot
          easily due to that.
          It has a fabulous perfume when split (it splits real easy) and of
          course the nuts are edible. It is not burnt much as it spits, but in
          a logburner it is great. I had heard a French saying that barrels used
          to be made of it, but I am unsure if this was true or not. Anyway, I
          will give it a go following your recipe and post the result.

          Oh, and I am going to tip a glass to that Crazy Oz as well. We had
          even heard of him here, he made front page of the broadsheets. Here's
          to you Crazy guy, better to live a day as a tiger than a lifetime as a
          sheep. Or summat like that hic... ;-)Anyway, good on you.
        • subsonic40grain
          It was annoying me. It was used for barrels for Balsamic vinegar, I knew I saw it somewhere. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chestnut
          Message 4 of 13 , Sep 4, 2006
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            It was annoying me. It was used for barrels for Balsamic vinegar, I
            knew I saw it somewhere.

            http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Chestnut
          • Robert Hubble
            Ah Link, Yer a man after me own heart. What are the chances a guy could arrange some kind of swap for some pecan wood? And would y happen to have some o
            Message 5 of 13 , Sep 4, 2006
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              Ah Link,

              Yer a man after me own heart. What are the chances a guy could arrange some
              kind of swap for some pecan wood? And would y' happen to have some o' that
              Drambuie wood, too, while we're at it?

              Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller




              >From: "link2d" <link2d@...>
              >Reply-To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
              >To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
              >Subject: [Distillers] Wood Chips
              >Date: Mon, 04 Sep 2006 14:36:37 -0000
              >
              >Wood Experiment
              >
              > The premise for this wood experiment is that I use woods for
              >grilling and slow cook (BBQing). I have a feel (taste) for the
              >transfer of smoked flavors into meats. I was wondering of the
              >ability to transfer flavors into spirits of the same wood. The
              >primary woods that I use are Hickory for grilling, Cherry, Lemon/
              >Orange, Maple, and Pecan for slow cooking. I've added Live Oak,
              >which is used in the fire place, to the mix for kicks and grins.
              >Wood was freshly chipped from logs from the wood pile. Although the
              >chips/splinters would be immersed in alcohol they were soaked in
              >sodium metabisulphite solution. Chips used were not toasted or
              >charred. That is the next phase of testing.
              > A 19% ABV sugar wash was run though a 36" column with copper mesh
              >packing. It ran off at 95%. The alcohol was diluted to 45% using
              >distilled water. Filtering was not necessary but for the sake of
              >this experiment it was run though Prestige Stone Carbon (activated
              >0.4 � 0.85 mm). The intent is for completely neutral spirit.
              >
              > Approximately 2 TBS were used per 1 Quart of 45% spirit. I
              >typically use that amount of chips for 1 gallon.
              >First week testing: Pictures are available. See Photos, `Woods
              >Chips'
              > 1. Cherry Wood- Light caramel color with a reddish hue. The wood
              >flavor is very mild with a slight sweet aftertaste. I do not
              >perceive tannin transfer or very slight. This may develop over time.
              > 2. Maple- Some color transfer. More of a tint, not `water white'.
              >Wood flavor almost not existent at this point. Some sweetness was
              >present. No tannin perceived to have been transferred. The least
              >flavor noted.
              > 3. Lemon/Orange- (Both woods are intermingled on the wood pile. I
              >am not able to tell the difference by appearance.) Color is a yellow
              >hue. Slight fruit flavor (not citrus) transferred with a good finish
              >that lingers. I think that this has promise as a stand alone
              >flavoring but doubt that it will greatly influence other flavors if
              >commingled.
              > 4. Pecan- This is my greatest surprise. Caramel color. Strong
              >pecan nut flavor as if sipping sweet pecan juice. Almost comes across
              >as an aperitif. Tannin feel on the tongue is noted. I think that
              >this has the best promise for blending. And this is just the first
              >week.
              > 5. Live Oak- Caramel color. Strong sweet wood flavor. Typical oak
              >tannin perceived.
              > 6. Hickory- Light caramel color. Very slight nutty flavor. Light
              >tannin perceived. This may develop over time.
              >
              >
              >Don't hesitate with comments, questions, or suggestions. (like this
              >group would hesitate)
              >
              >
              >Link
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              > Distillers list archives : http://archive.nnytech.net/
              > FAQ and other information at http://homedistiller.org
              >Yahoo! Groups Links
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >

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            • where in the world is kim
              Keep up the good work... and keep us up to date on your experiment.... you just might find a new flavor... Kim ... From: link2d To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
              Message 6 of 13 , Sep 4, 2006
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                Keep up the good work... and keep us up to date on your experiment.... you just might find a new flavor...

                Kim



                ----- Original Message -----
                From: link2d
                To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 10:36 AM
                Subject: [Distillers] Wood Chips


                Wood Experiment

                The premise for this wood experiment is that I use woods for
                grilling and slow cook (BBQing). I have a feel (taste) for the
                transfer of smoked flavors into meats. I was wondering of the
                ability to transfer flavors into spirits of the same wood. The
                primary woods that I use are Hickory for grilling, Cherry, Lemon/
                Orange, Maple, and Pecan for slow cooking. I've added Live Oak,
                which is used in the fire place, to the mix for kicks and grins.
                Wood was freshly chipped from logs from the wood pile. Although the
                chips/splinters would be immersed in alcohol they were soaked in
                sodium metabisulphite solution. Chips used were not toasted or
                charred. That is the next phase of testing.
                A 19% ABV sugar wash was run though a 36" column with copper mesh
                packing. It ran off at 95%. The alcohol was diluted to 45% using
                distilled water. Filtering was not necessary but for the sake of
                this experiment it was run though Prestige Stone Carbon (activated
                0.4 - 0.85 mm). The intent is for completely neutral spirit.

                Approximately 2 TBS were used per 1 Quart of 45% spirit. I
                typically use that amount of chips for 1 gallon.
                First week testing: Pictures are available. See Photos, `Woods
                Chips'
                1. Cherry Wood- Light caramel color with a reddish hue. The wood
                flavor is very mild with a slight sweet aftertaste. I do not
                perceive tannin transfer or very slight. This may develop over time.
                2. Maple- Some color transfer. More of a tint, not `water white'.
                Wood flavor almost not existent at this point. Some sweetness was
                present. No tannin perceived to have been transferred. The least
                flavor noted.
                3. Lemon/Orange- (Both woods are intermingled on the wood pile. I
                am not able to tell the difference by appearance.) Color is a yellow
                hue. Slight fruit flavor (not citrus) transferred with a good finish
                that lingers. I think that this has promise as a stand alone
                flavoring but doubt that it will greatly influence other flavors if
                commingled.
                4. Pecan- This is my greatest surprise. Caramel color. Strong
                pecan nut flavor as if sipping sweet pecan juice. Almost comes across
                as an aperitif. Tannin feel on the tongue is noted. I think that
                this has the best promise for blending. And this is just the first
                week.
                5. Live Oak- Caramel color. Strong sweet wood flavor. Typical oak
                tannin perceived.
                6. Hickory- Light caramel color. Very slight nutty flavor. Light
                tannin perceived. This may develop over time.

                Don't hesitate with comments, questions, or suggestions. (like this
                group would hesitate)

                Link





                [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
              • Link D'Antoni
                Zymurgy, I 0NLY have a cord and a half of pecan on the wood pile at the moment... :-). I d be glad to ship you what you d like. Do you have means of
                Message 7 of 13 , Sep 5, 2006
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                  Zymurgy,

                  I 0NLY have a cord and a half of pecan on the wood
                  pile at the moment... :-).
                  I'd be glad to ship you what you'd like. Do you have
                  means of splitting? I can drag out my 9 tons electric
                  splitter if need be.
                  Give me some info. You might do that in a private
                  mail, right?

                  Link
                  link2d@...


                  --- Robert Hubble <zymurgybob@...> wrote:

                  > Ah Link,
                  >
                  > Yer a man after me own heart. What are the chances a
                  > guy could arrange some
                  > kind of swap for some pecan wood? And would y'
                  > happen to have some o' that
                  > Drambuie wood, too, while we're at it?
                  >
                  > Zymurgy Bob, a simple potstiller
                  >
                  >
                  >

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                • Link D'Antoni
                  Kim, I produced toasted and charred chips of each wood but the dog ate my home work. Really. My son brought his dog over and it scattered all my chips
                  Message 8 of 13 , Sep 5, 2006
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                    Kim,
                    I produced toasted and charred chips of each wood but
                    the dog ate my home work. Really. My son brought his
                    dog over and it scattered all my chips throughout the
                    yard.
                    I'll give that another go sometime this week.

                    Stay tuned.

                    Link

                    --- where in the world is kim
                    <whereintheworldiskim@...> wrote:

                    > Keep up the good work... and keep us up to date on
                    > your experiment.... you just might find a new
                    > flavor...
                    >
                    > Kim
                    >
                    >
                    >
                    > ----- Original Message -----
                    > From: link2d
                    > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                    > Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 10:36 AM
                    > Subject: [Distillers] Wood Chips
                    >
                    >
                    > Wood Experiment
                    >
                    >
                    >


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                  • where in the world is kim
                    just make sure that you don t pick up any dog chips... [;-) Kim ... From: Link D Antoni To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 10:18
                    Message 9 of 13 , Sep 5, 2006
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                      just make sure that you don't pick up any dog chips... [;-)

                      Kim


                      ----- Original Message -----
                      From: Link D'Antoni
                      To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      Sent: Tuesday, September 05, 2006 10:18 AM
                      Subject: Re: [Distillers] Wood Chips


                      Kim,
                      I produced toasted and charred chips of each wood but
                      the dog ate my home work. Really. My son brought his
                      dog over and it scattered all my chips throughout the
                      yard.
                      I'll give that another go sometime this week.

                      Stay tuned.

                      Link

                      --- where in the world is kim
                      <whereintheworldiskim@...> wrote:

                      > Keep up the good work... and keep us up to date on
                      > your experiment.... you just might find a new
                      > flavor...
                      >
                      > Kim
                      >
                      >
                      >
                      > ----- Original Message -----
                      > From: link2d
                      > To: Distillers@yahoogroups.com
                      > Sent: Monday, September 04, 2006 10:36 AM
                      > Subject: [Distillers] Wood Chips
                      >
                      >
                      > Wood Experiment
                      >
                      >
                      >

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                      [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
                    • Mark
                      ... Thanks for sharing the info. I m 15 years into this hobby, and I still try different woods and charring and soaking techniques and... and... I tried
                      Message 10 of 13 , Sep 8, 2006
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                        --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "link2d" <link2d@...> wrote:
                        >
                        > Wood Experiment
                        >
                        > <big snip>

                        > Don't hesitate with comments, questions, or suggestions. (like this
                        > group would hesitate)
                        >
                        >
                        > Link
                        >
                        Thanks for sharing the info. I'm 15 years into this hobby, and I
                        still try different woods and charring and soaking techniques and...
                        and...

                        I tried mesquite once. Horrid. Appalling.

                        For grins, consider adding maple syrup at a rate of 5ml per litre
                        AFTER the wood soak.

                        In the beginners group I have a file posted on how I soak alco on wood.

                        Mark
                      • Link D'Antoni
                        Mark, Yeah, i don t even cook with mesquite as the Texas boys do. To me it has a creosote finish/after taste. A friend suggest that I try some cedar that I
                        Message 11 of 13 , Sep 8, 2006
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                          Mark,

                          Yeah, i don't even cook with mesquite as the Texas
                          boys do. To me it has a creosote finish/after taste.
                          A friend suggest that I try some cedar that I have on
                          the wood pile. I don't want to waste the pint.
                          When I use the maple wood in smoking it taste like
                          maple syrup is pour over the meat. After the
                          completion of the woods experiment on the neutral
                          spirit I'll try the maple syrup. I wonder how maple
                          will do in my rum? hmmmm?

                          Thanks,

                          Link


                          --- Mark <markgofast@...> wrote:

                          > --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "link2d"
                          > <link2d@...> wrote:
                          > >
                          > > Wood Experiment
                          > >
                          > > <big snip>
                          >
                          > > Don't hesitate with comments, questions, or
                          > suggestions. (like this
                          > > group would hesitate)
                          > >
                          > >
                          > > Link
                          > >
                          > Thanks for sharing the info. I'm 15 years into this
                          > hobby, and I
                          > still try different woods and charring and soaking
                          > techniques and...
                          > and...
                          >
                          > I tried mesquite once. Horrid. Appalling.
                          >
                          > For grins, consider adding maple syrup at a rate of
                          > 5ml per litre
                          > AFTER the wood soak.
                          >
                          > In the beginners group I have a file posted on how I
                          > soak alco on wood.
                          >
                          > Mark
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >
                          >


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                        • Larry
                          ... The best South Texas barbecue is actually made with a mix of 60% Mesquite and 40% Oak, for exactly the reason you mention. That s what nearly all the BBQ
                          Message 12 of 13 , Sep 9, 2006
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                            At 09:49 PM 09/08/2006, you wrote:
                            >Yeah, i don't even cook with mesquite as the Texas
                            >boys do. To me it has a creosote finish/after taste.

                            The best South Texas barbecue is actually made with a mix of 60% Mesquite
                            and 40% Oak, for exactly the reason you mention.

                            That's what nearly all the BBQ restaurants south of Waco use.

                            North of Waco, you they don't smoke it long enough, and use only pure Oak
                            or Oak mixed with a little Pecan, or Hickory sawdust.

                            If beef brisket is smoked correctly, a pure mesquite fire will flavor the
                            meat way too strongly, and in fact may put a thick "Smoke Crust" on it that
                            can even cause "Intestinal Distress"... it'll give you The Trots.

                            I couldn't imagine flavoring liquor with it. Like you said, you might just
                            well go out and shave some slivers off the nearest telephone pole, and
                            throw them into your jug to age.
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