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Re: watts vs btus, gas vs electricity

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  • miciofelice2003
    Hi, Zapata. 1 BTU = 0.252 Cal 1 Kw = 860 Cal/h Ciao a tutti micio felice ... how ... trying ... a ... conversions ... not ... seem ... down ... insight? ...
    Message 1 of 9 , Jul 7, 2006
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      Hi, Zapata.


      1 BTU = 0.252 Cal

      1 Kw = 860 Cal/h

      Ciao a tutti

      micio felice






      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, !Zapata Vive! <zapatavive@...>
      wrote:
      >
      > I'm working on a new stilling setup, and am trying to understand
      how
      > to relate gas burners to electric elements. Specifically I'm
      trying
      > to decide how a 60,000 btu gas burner would work compared to say
      a
      > 1500 watt heating element. The only thing is, all the
      conversions
      > I've found online require the element of time for the watts, but
      not
      > the btus. Is this right? I don't really know, but it doesn't
      seem
      > right. That would make a simple gas burner the equivalent to a
      > 14,000 watt element?
      >
      > Or have I screwed it up somehow? It seems if that calculation is
      > right, then I'd worry about being able to turn the gas burner
      down
      > low enough to actually be able to use it.
      >
      > Any of ya'll drive on propane instead of electricity? Any
      insight?
      > I've driven a couple of stills on electricity before, but gas is
      > appealing for my current situation. I have a buddy that drives
      his
      > glorified pot still on propane, but he's not much of a thinker,
      he
      > just fills the pot and gets drunk while it runs all day. I can't
      get
      > much lucid insight out of him other than, "I dunno man, I just
      light
      > it up, and taste it till it's ready to cut, by the time I make
      my
      > cuts, I'm so drunk I'm lucky if I'm still standin' when it's
      > done." (thank goodness his wife always turns the still off when
      he
      > does pass out!)
      >
      > Thanks
      >
    • Link D'Antoni
      Zapata, I run on propane. As my stove is electric and cycles on and off. Talk about a nightmare! I, too, had you quandry. I run pot and reflux units. To
      Message 2 of 9 , Jul 7, 2006
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        Zapata,

        I run on propane. As my stove is electric and
        cycles on and off. Talk about a nightmare!
        I, too, had you quandry.
        I run pot and reflux units. To answer you question,
        I knew about how long it took to get to the IBP
        (Initial Boiling Point) When converting to propane, I
        start off slow and worked up to the valve adjustment
        that works. I marked my valve at two locations, the
        heat up stage and the run stage. btw, my pin valve
        works better as it is better controled and more
        percise for setting to a mark as opposed to the valve
        that requires several turns then hitting a mark. Keep
        your eye on the temp gauge and flame.
        During the heat up stage I can see the flame rounding
        the bottom of the pot. When my top of column temps
        reaches 150ish F, I cut the flame waaaaay back to
        almost a pilot light and slowly bring up from there.
        It did take some practice. But Practice Makes
        Perfect.

        Hope this helps,

        Link

        --- !Zapata Vive! <zapatavive@...> wrote:

        > I'm working on a new stilling setup, and am trying
        > to understand how
        > to relate gas burners to electric elements.
        > Specifically I'm trying
        > to decide how a 60,000 btu gas burner would work
        > compared to say a
        > 1500 watt heating element. The only thing is, all
        > the conversions
        > I've found online require the element of time for
        > the watts, but not
        > the btus. Is this right? I don't really know, but
        > it doesn't seem
        > right. That would make a simple gas burner the
        > equivalent to a
        > 14,000 watt element?
        >
        > Or have I screwed it up somehow? It seems if that
        > calculation is
        > right, then I'd worry about being able to turn the
        > gas burner down
        > low enough to actually be able to use it.
        >
        > Any of ya'll drive on propane instead of
        > electricity? Any insight?
        > I've driven a couple of stills on electricity
        > before, but gas is
        > appealing for my current situation. I have a buddy
        > that drives his
        > glorified pot still on propane, but he's not much of
        > a thinker, he
        > just fills the pot and gets drunk while it runs all
        > day. I can't get
        > much lucid insight out of him other than, "I dunno
        > man, I just light
        > it up, and taste it till it's ready to cut, by the
        > time I make my
        > cuts, I'm so drunk I'm lucky if I'm still standin'
        > when it's
        > done." (thank goodness his wife always turns the
        > still off when he
        > does pass out!)
        >
        > Thanks
        >
        >
        >
        >


        __________________________________________________
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      • !Zapata Vive!
        Thanks to all. Thanks to the info, I ve figured it all out, and basically concluded that nearly any gas burner will provide more than enough power for my
        Message 3 of 9 , Jul 7, 2006
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          Thanks to all. Thanks to the info, I've figured it all out, and
          basically concluded that nearly any gas burner will provide more than
          enough power for my stilling needs.

          I'll just need to make a few runs to get used to having all that
          control.

          Just one more question. How much gas do you run through? I know it
          depends on your boiler size and whatnot, I'm just wondering if I need
          to have several tanks on hand or what. I'm assuming that I'll need
          at least 2 standard BBQ tanks so I can fully empty a partial tank and
          still have a fresh tank to finish on. It would be helpful to know
          for example, "for my x size boiler, I use 10 pounds of propane for a
          1.5 hour boil up and a 12 hour distillation."

          Thanks again.

          On Jul 7, 2006, at 9:48 AM, Link D'Antoni wrote:

          > Zapata,
          >
          > I run on propane. As my stove is electric and
          > cycles on and off. Talk about a nightmare!
          > I, too, had you quandry.
          > I run pot and reflux units. To answer you question,
          > I knew about how long it took to get to the IBP
          > (Initial Boiling Point) When converting to propane, I
          > start off slow and worked up to the valve adjustment
          > that works. I marked my valve at two locations, the
          > heat up stage and the run stage. btw, my pin valve
          > works better as it is better controled and more
          > percise for setting to a mark as opposed to the valve
          > that requires several turns then hitting a mark. Keep
          > your eye on the temp gauge and flame.
          > During the heat up stage I can see the flame rounding
          > the bottom of the pot. When my top of column temps
          > reaches 150ish F, I cut the flame waaaaay back to
          > almost a pilot light and slowly bring up from there.
          > It did take some practice. But Practice Makes
          > Perfect.
          >
          > Hope this helps,
          >
          > Link
          >
          > --- !Zapata Vive! <zapatavive@...> wrote:
          >
          > > I'm working on a new stilling setup, and am trying
          > > to understand how
          > > to relate gas burners to electric elements.
          > > Specifically I'm trying
          > > to decide how a 60,000 btu gas burner would work
          > > compared to say a
          > > 1500 watt heating element. The only thing is, all
          > > the conversions
          > > I've found online require the element of time for
          > > the watts, but not
          > > the btus. Is this right? I don't really know, but
          > > it doesn't seem
          > > right. That would make a simple gas burner the
          > > equivalent to a
          > > 14,000 watt element?
          > >
          > > Or have I screwed it up somehow? It seems if that
          > > calculation is
          > > right, then I'd worry about being able to turn the
          > > gas burner down
          > > low enough to actually be able to use it.
          > >
          > > Any of ya'll drive on propane instead of
          > > electricity? Any insight?
          > > I've driven a couple of stills on electricity
          > > before, but gas is
          > > appealing for my current situation. I have a buddy
          > > that drives his
          > > glorified pot still on propane, but he's not much of
          > > a thinker, he
          > > just fills the pot and gets drunk while it runs all
          > > day. I can't get
          > > much lucid insight out of him other than, "I dunno
          > > man, I just light
          > > it up, and taste it till it's ready to cut, by the
          > > time I make my
          > > cuts, I'm so drunk I'm lucky if I'm still standin'
          > > when it's
          > > done." (thank goodness his wife always turns the
          > > still off when he
          > > does pass out!)
          > >
          > > Thanks
          > >
          > >
          > >
          > >
          >
          > __________________________________________________
          > Do You Yahoo!?
          > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam protection around
          > http://mail.yahoo.com
          >
          >



          [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
        • Larry
          ... Visit www.u-haul.com click on propane & grilling , then Buy propane supplies online . Check out the Propane Gauge and Leak Detector for $19.95.
          Message 4 of 9 , Jul 7, 2006
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            At 11:03 AM 07/07/2006, you wrote:
            > I'm just wondering if I need to have several tanks on hand or what. I'm
            > assuming that I'll need at least 2 standard BBQ tanks so I can fully
            > empty a partial tank and
            >still have a fresh tank to finish on.

            Visit www.u-haul.com click on "propane & grilling", then "Buy propane
            supplies online".

            Check out the "Propane Gauge and Leak Detector" for $19.95.

            http://store.uhaul.com/product_detail.aspx?id=3023





            [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
          • greg tufts
            I get at least four runs a bbq tank, and keep 2 tanks. cheers ... __________________________________________________ Do You Yahoo!? Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail
            Message 5 of 9 , Jul 8, 2006
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              I get at least four runs a bbq tank, and keep 2
              tanks.
              cheers
              --- !Zapata Vive! <zapatavive@...> wrote:

              > Thanks to all. Thanks to the info, I've figured it
              > all out, and
              > basically concluded that nearly any gas burner will
              > provide more than
              > enough power for my stilling needs.
              >
              > I'll just need to make a few runs to get used to
              > having all that
              > control.
              >
              > Just one more question. How much gas do you run
              > through? I know it
              > depends on your boiler size and whatnot, I'm just
              > wondering if I need
              > to have several tanks on hand or what. I'm assuming
              > that I'll need
              > at least 2 standard BBQ tanks so I can fully empty a
              > partial tank and
              > still have a fresh tank to finish on. It would be
              > helpful to know
              > for example, "for my x size boiler, I use 10 pounds
              > of propane for a
              > 1.5 hour boil up and a 12 hour distillation."
              >
              > Thanks again.
              >
              > On Jul 7, 2006, at 9:48 AM, Link D'Antoni wrote:
              >
              > > Zapata,
              > >
              > > I run on propane. As my stove is electric and
              > > cycles on and off. Talk about a nightmare!
              > > I, too, had you quandry.
              > > I run pot and reflux units. To answer you
              > question,
              > > I knew about how long it took to get to the IBP
              > > (Initial Boiling Point) When converting to
              > propane, I
              > > start off slow and worked up to the valve
              > adjustment
              > > that works. I marked my valve at two locations,
              > the
              > > heat up stage and the run stage. btw, my pin valve
              > > works better as it is better controled and more
              > > percise for setting to a mark as opposed to the
              > valve
              > > that requires several turns then hitting a mark.
              > Keep
              > > your eye on the temp gauge and flame.
              > > During the heat up stage I can see the flame
              > rounding
              > > the bottom of the pot. When my top of column temps
              > > reaches 150ish F, I cut the flame waaaaay back to
              > > almost a pilot light and slowly bring up from
              > there.
              > > It did take some practice. But Practice Makes
              > > Perfect.
              > >
              > > Hope this helps,
              > >
              > > Link
              > >
              > > --- !Zapata Vive! <zapatavive@...> wrote:
              > >
              > > > I'm working on a new stilling setup, and am
              > trying
              > > > to understand how
              > > > to relate gas burners to electric elements.
              > > > Specifically I'm trying
              > > > to decide how a 60,000 btu gas burner would work
              > > > compared to say a
              > > > 1500 watt heating element. The only thing is,
              > all
              > > > the conversions
              > > > I've found online require the element of time
              > for
              > > > the watts, but not
              > > > the btus. Is this right? I don't really know,
              > but
              > > > it doesn't seem
              > > > right. That would make a simple gas burner the
              > > > equivalent to a
              > > > 14,000 watt element?
              > > >
              > > > Or have I screwed it up somehow? It seems if
              > that
              > > > calculation is
              > > > right, then I'd worry about being able to turn
              > the
              > > > gas burner down
              > > > low enough to actually be able to use it.
              > > >
              > > > Any of ya'll drive on propane instead of
              > > > electricity? Any insight?
              > > > I've driven a couple of stills on electricity
              > > > before, but gas is
              > > > appealing for my current situation. I have a
              > buddy
              > > > that drives his
              > > > glorified pot still on propane, but he's not
              > much of
              > > > a thinker, he
              > > > just fills the pot and gets drunk while it runs
              > all
              > > > day. I can't get
              > > > much lucid insight out of him other than, "I
              > dunno
              > > > man, I just light
              > > > it up, and taste it till it's ready to cut, by
              > the
              > > > time I make my
              > > > cuts, I'm so drunk I'm lucky if I'm still
              > standin'
              > > > when it's
              > > > done." (thank goodness his wife always turns the
              > > > still off when he
              > > > does pass out!)
              > > >
              > > > Thanks
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > > >
              > >
              > > __________________________________________________
              > > Do You Yahoo!?
              > > Tired of spam? Yahoo! Mail has the best spam
              > protection around
              > > http://mail.yahoo.com
              > >
              > >
              >
              >
              >
              > [Non-text portions of this message have been
              > removed]
              >
              >
              >
              >
              >

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