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pumps [was: temp misreadings]

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  • Trid
    ... I m quite satisfied with my pumps, both being fountain pumps. It s been so long since I discarded the packaging that I have no idea what their ratings
    Message 1 of 94 , Jun 1, 2006
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      --- Harry <gnikomson2000@...> wrote:
      >
      > > i tried one of the fountain pumps but it wasnt up to the job, i
      > > now use a half horsepower pump an it does its job great
      > >

      > Jim,
      > I assume you have a coil condenser? High friction low volume ratio
      > is always a problem with them.
      >
      > There's a big difference in running costs between a 24w full duty
      > cycle pump and your 373w pump, especially if you're running for many
      > hours at a time. Some of the big pumps aren't designed for
      > continuous duty cycle. But if it works for you, & you don't mind
      > the high cost of operation and possible short working life of the
      > pump, then that's fine.

      I'm quite satisfied with my pumps, both being fountain pumps. It's been so
      long since I discarded the packaging that I have no idea what their ratings
      are. However, my preference is to use a leibig style (straight tube-in-tube)
      condenser. This is a very low resistance style arrangement so low pressure is
      generally not a problem. When I run reflux runs, I have a smaller pump
      dedicated to the reflux coil and a larger pump for the final condenser (the
      leibig style). What I found is that running water from a bucket through the
      reflux coil (single spiral) and letting it drain instead of recirculate (to
      ensure constant temperature) it is actually more than enough flow through the
      coil and I shunt some of the water back to the bucket before it gets to the
      coil in order to maintain the proper head temperature (AKA c.m. or Cooling
      Management). All the liebig condenser has to do at that point is to cool the
      vapors that get past the reflux coil...the larger pump is most likely much
      overkill in that application.

      I suppose there's a point to my rambling :)
      Oh yeah, perhaps dividing the duty between smaller pumps can be more efficient
      than boosting the power of a single pump to handle it all. Design helps too,
      in order to reduce the flow resistance and to allow the pumps to operate at
      maximum efficiency, too. It's no sense in throttling back a pump that's 4
      times the required size when two smaller pumps will cost less than half and use
      less than half the power...carried forward to the electric bill.

      For my own benefit, having a small cache of pumps allows more options to
      experiment with and allows cost effective expansion/augmentation as necessary.
      More components means (to me) more options and configurations...sometimes only
      for fun and not for any operational necessity. But then, we're all in this
      hobby for fun and not necessity, anyway, so it's spot on :)

      Trid
      -eyeing some undeveloped acreage for my, er, "experimental fuel plant"
    • Distillers@yahoogroups.com
      The following Distillers poll is now closed. Here are the final results: POLL QUESTION: Potstillers How do you decide when to make a cut in your spirit run ?
      Message 94 of 94 , Apr 2, 2008
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        The following Distillers poll is now closed. Here are the
        final results:


        POLL QUESTION: Potstillers
        How do you decide when to make a cut in your spirit run ?

        CHOICES AND RESULTS
        - By Taste, 4 votes, 6.15%
        - By Smell, 3 votes, 4.62%
        - By Taste & Smell, 28 votes, 43.08%
        - By Temprature, 15 votes, 23.08%
        - By Alchohol Volume, 15 votes, 23.08%



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        http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Distillers

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