Loading ...
Sorry, an error occurred while loading the content.

How clear should your wash be?

Expand Messages
  • Robert Mitchell
    I ve done 3 runs with my Still and doubler. I ve been an all grain brewer for about 25 years and so I ve pretty much followed my previous practice of letting
    Message 1 of 3 , Oct 31, 2001
    • 0 Attachment

      I've done 3 runs with my Still and doubler. I've been an all grain brewer for about 25 years and so I've pretty much followed my previous practice of letting the wash finish fermenting, sticking it in a secondary fermenter with an air lock and letting it sit for 2 months or so untiil it's crystal clear. Obviously, for beer, you need it crystal clear before you bottle it. 

      do I ned to go to all that trouble ? Can I just put the cloudy stuff in my boiler and put a few ss scubbies into my column to strip out any nasty yeasty stuff? Whatever flavours I'm extracting are coming from what I've put in the doubler ( which is 4 & 1/2 gals, very big for a doubler). For example,soaking barley  malt in clear wash and putting that in  the doubler seems to result in a sweetish carry which you find in Scotch or Irish whiskey



      Do You Yahoo!?
      Make a great connection at Yahoo! Personals.
    • Robert Mitchell
      Thanks for the reply. For beer, i ve always used unflavoured gelain. Its a powder available in any supermarket. The brand I use is KNOX. You dissove one
      Message 2 of 3 , Nov 1, 2001
      • 0 Attachment

         Thanks for the reply. For beer, i"ve always used unflavoured gelain. Its a powder available in any supermarket. The brand I use is KNOX. You dissove  one packet in about 4 oz of warm water and stir it in the beer to mix it thouroughly. It settles out all the suspended particles in about 24 hrs. However, it doesn't work if the wash is still working even slightlybecause any bubbles just stir the beer up.

        Gary Gluyas <gluyas@...> wrote:

        Hi
         
        The wash should be (ideally) ALLWAYS , crystal clear prior to distilling.  Most Important.
         
        The milkiness is simply: suspended dead yeast cells.
         
        When those dead yeast cells are heated (at the time of distilling) they break open and impart a very bitter taste into the wash which is then transferred into your distillate - even with a reflux still!
         
        Turbo Clear is a product that is commercially available which will drop out the sediment overnight to speed up the process.  Otherwise leave the wash to settle as you are doing currently.
         
        Cheers  Kiwi Gary
         
        MILL-FORD LODGE HOMEBREW SHOP
         
         
         
        ----- Original Message -----
        Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2001 4:12 PM
        Subject: [Distillers] How clear should your wash be?

        I've done 3 runs with my Still and doubler. I've been an all grain brewer for about 25 years and so I've pretty much followed my previous practice of letting the wash finish fermenting, sticking it in a secondary fermenter with an air lock and letting it sit for 2 months or so untiil it's crystal clear. Obviously, for beer, you need it crystal clear before you bottle it. 

        do I ned to go to all that trouble ? Can I just put the cloudy stuff in my boiler and put a few ss scubbies into my column to strip out any nasty yeasty stuff? Whatever flavours I'm extracting are coming from what I've put in the doubler ( which is 4 & 1/2 gals, very big for a doubler). For example,soaking barley  malt in clear wash and putting that in  the doubler seems to result in a sweetish carry which you find in Scotch or Irish whiskey



        Do You Yahoo!?
        Make a great connection at Yahoo! Personals.

        Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



        Do You Yahoo!?
        Find a job, post your resume on Yahoo! Careers.

      • Ian
        The smell is from cooked yeast and yes the carbon will clean up the spirit. Pilch ... From: glen To: distillers Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 11:03 AM
        Message 3 of 3 , Nov 1, 2001
        • 0 Attachment
          The smell is from cooked yeast and yes the carbon will clean up the spirit.
          Pilch
          ----- Original Message -----
          From: glen
          Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 11:03 AM
          Subject: Fw: [Distillers] How clear should your wash be?

          Well i will be able to tell you how it goes cause being a person a trila and error and believeing in finding out the hard way...this batch i decided to try stilling (reflux 5L) without clearing my wash just to see the results it seeme to be ok so far just when you tips the left over wash out it reaks!!!...im kinda hopeing the carbon treating which you have to do will remove any ill effect it has.
           
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Friday, November 02, 2001 11:24 AM
          Subject: Re: [Distillers] How clear should your wash be?

           Thanks for the reply. For beer, i"ve always used unflavoured gelain. Its a powder available in any supermarket. The brand I use is KNOX. You dissove  one packet in about 4 oz of warm water and stir it in the beer to mix it thouroughly. It settles out all the suspended particles in about 24 hrs. However, it doesn't work if the wash is still working even slightlybecause any bubbles just stir the beer up.

          Gary Gluyas <gluyas@...> wrote:

          Hi
           
          The wash should be (ideally) ALLWAYS , crystal clear prior to distilling.  Most Important.
           
          The milkiness is simply: suspended dead yeast cells.
           
          When those dead yeast cells are heated (at the time of distilling) they break open and impart a very bitter taste into the wash which is then transferred into your distillate - even with a reflux still!
           
          Turbo Clear is a product that is commercially available which will drop out the sediment overnight to speed up the process.  Otherwise leave the wash to settle as you are doing currently.
           
          Cheers  Kiwi Gary
           
          MILL-FORD LODGE HOMEBREW SHOP
           
           
           
          ----- Original Message -----
          Sent: Thursday, November 01, 2001 4:12 PM
          Subject: [Distillers] How clear should your wash be?

          I've done 3 runs with my Still and doubler. I've been an all grain brewer for about 25 years and so I've pretty much followed my previous practice of letting the wash finish fermenting, sticking it in a secondary fermenter with an air lock and letting it sit for 2 months or so untiil it's crystal clear. Obviously, for beer, you need it crystal clear before you bottle it. 

          do I ned to go to all that trouble ? Can I just put the cloudy stuff in my boiler and put a few ss scubbies into my column to strip out any nasty yeasty stuff? Whatever flavours I'm extracting are coming from what I've put in the doubler ( which is 4 & 1/2 gals, very big for a doubler). For example,soaking barley  malt in clear wash and putting that in  the doubler seems to result in a sweetish carry which you find in Scotch or Irish whiskey



          Do You Yahoo!?
          Make a great connection at Yahoo! Personals.

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.



          Do You Yahoo!?
          Find a job, post your resume on Yahoo! Careers.

          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.


          Your use of Yahoo! Groups is subject to the Yahoo! Terms of Service.

        Your message has been successfully submitted and would be delivered to recipients shortly.