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RE: [Distillers] Re: Amphora stills

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  • Robert Thomas
    Mark, this is all good info, but for a nOOb to pumping, what should we look for. Head I understand (and believe is given in pump specs) but is pipe diameter?
    Message 1 of 13 , May 4, 2006
      Mark,
      this is all good info,
      but for a nOOb to pumping, what should we look for. Head I understand
      (and believe is given in pump specs) but is pipe diameter?
      Any simple info available?
      let's say I have to push up 5 feet (=x) through 10mm tube (=y) of some
      length (=z),
      what pump do I need (fn[x,y,z])?
      cheers
      Rob.


      --- Mark Nelson <mnelson@...> wrote:

      > Harry,
      >
      > When discussing recirculation (centrifugal) pumps, it is very
      > important to
      > remember that head height (the highest point the pump will lift the
      > water)
      > as well as the diameter of all the tubing (the volume/weight of water
      > to be
      > lifted) are more important than the wattage everyone keeps referring
      > to. As
      > an example, my still is fourteen feet tall and I use 3/8" tubing
      > throughout,
      > I need a 1/6 horsepower waterfall pump (two actually, but that is
      > another
      > story) to operate properly.
      >
      > So what I am trying to say is that everyone should make sure to read
      > the
      > manufacturer's instructions noting the height and capacity for their
      > application. Just my two cents worth, I'd hate to see anyone waste
      > money on
      > a pump not properly sized.
      >
      > Mark
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      >
      > [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      >
      >


      Cheers,
      Rob.

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    • Mark Nelson
      Rob, Ah, that is the point I wanted to bring to the table. Unfortunately, there are not any standard pump spec s, so a formula that would apply to all is
      Message 2 of 13 , May 4, 2006
        Rob,

        Ah, that is the point I wanted to bring to the table. Unfortunately, there
        are not any standard pump spec's, so a formula that would apply to all is
        unfeasible. Wattage is not in direct relation to the volume of the pump
        only an indicator. Every pump is different and each manufacturer makes
        different models with different spec's. Because of the differences, the
        manufactures put various head heights and volumes expected at each head
        height on their products. Length plays a very small role because the length
        usually equals the head height in fountain applications. With a bit of
        geometry, one can figure out the exact pump for their application. Every
        person's still setup is different, but it is easy to figure out. One last
        point. We are talking about centrifugal pumps, listed as aquarium, fountain,
        sump etc.

        Hope this helps,
        Mark







        [Non-text portions of this message have been removed]
      • Harry
        ... important to ... the water) ... water to be ... referring to. As ... throughout, ... another ... read the ... their ... money on ... Quite true, Mark. The
        Message 3 of 13 , May 4, 2006
          --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, "Mark Nelson" <mnelson@...> wrote:
          >
          > Harry,
          >
          > When discussing recirculation (centrifugal) pumps, it is very
          important to
          > remember that head height (the highest point the pump will lift
          the water)
          > as well as the diameter of all the tubing (the volume/weight of
          water to be
          > lifted) are more important than the wattage everyone keeps
          referring to. As
          > an example, my still is fourteen feet tall and I use 3/8" tubing
          throughout,
          > I need a 1/6 horsepower waterfall pump (two actually, but that is
          another
          > story) to operate properly.
          >
          > So what I am trying to say is that everyone should make sure to
          read the
          > manufacturer's instructions noting the height and capacity for
          their
          > application. Just my two cents worth, I'd hate to see anyone waste
          money on
          > a pump not properly sized.
          >
          > Mark


          Quite true, Mark. The reason I mention wattage at all is simple.
          Running costs. To design a recirc system, one would have to weigh
          up the overall running costs against any potential savings of the
          normally wasted water. Obviously this won't be a factor in all
          cases. Some people just don't have the water to waste, regardless
          of cost or savings.

          But the point is, in any potential design, it's always prudent to
          design for efficiency. There's no point in saving 50 cents on water
          by spending $5 on electricity to achieve it. Therefore the lower
          the wattage rating you can get away with, the cheaper will be the
          running costs. In my case, a 17 watt pump and a 54 watt fanhead (71
          watt draw total) is sufficient to pump 6 litres a minute through the
          x-flow and handle up to 1800 watts of electric element heat input.
          IOW, for less than what a standard house light globe draws, I have
          my recirc system and cooling needs solved. That same pump wouldn't
          even begin to do the job if hooked up to a coil. Too much friction.

          I believe there are some aquarium sites on the 'net that go into
          pump sizing calcs in some detail. One that gives a bit of general
          info here...
          http://www.bestfish.com/pondpump.html

          It would indeed be useful to have a set of charts re pump capacity
          and tubing bore diameter x length. Maybe that's a project to look
          into.


          Slainte!
          regards Harry
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