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Re: For Critique

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  • Harry
    ... However, in a ... ratio of the ethanol in a liquid that contains some ethanol (amount as yet unknown) to the known SG or density of PURE ETHANOL, not
    Message 1 of 32 , May 1, 2006
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      --- In Distillers@yahoogroups.com, Trid <triddlywinks@...> wrote:
      >
      >>
      > Bwuh? We *are* comparing the density to water.


      >>>>>>>>>>No we're not. Bear with me.


      > Therefore, in the finished product of a given brew, I agree.
      However, in a
      > distillate, we are in fact measuring the ratio of ethanol to water


      >>>>>>>No we're not. In a finished product, we're measuring the
      ratio of the ethanol in a liquid that contains some ethanol (amount
      as yet unknown) to the known SG or density of PURE ETHANOL, not
      water. This resulting figure is the Alcohol By Volume not the water
      by volume. The other liquids/substances in the sample could be many
      things besides water.

      Alcoholmeters are calibrated to pure ethanol at 20°C. Hydrometers
      are calibrated to pure water at 4°C. See the difference? Even
      though technically they are both hydrometers. All that name means
      is a closed tube that floats.
      >>>>>>>>>>>>>>>>


      > Agreed...lots of nifty info. However, it's all brewing specific.
      Given that
      > it's stated that alcohol has a specific gravity of 0.789, it is
      therefore
      > measureable - with a hydrometer...just one that's scaled to read
      <1.0


      >>>>>>>>>>>You won't get meaningful measurements, because the two
      instruments are calibrated to different pure substances at different
      base temperatures.
      >>>>>>>>>>>>>



      >
      > Further digging via Google reveals that alcoholmeters are merely
      hydrometers
      > calibrated in %abv with temp correction factors in their
      documentation. From
      > Widder, a manufacturer of alcoholmeters, their description of how
      to use/read
      > it (http://www.widdernet.de/alcoholmeter.html) has at least one
      paragraph where
      > the terms appear to be used interchangably.


      >>>>>>>>>See my explanation above.


      >
      > Bear in mind, my intent is not to be argumentive, but rather that
      since what I
      > have on hand is a hydrometer ranged from 0.650-1.000, that's what
      I'm working
      > with and am looking to for reference. From my calculations, my
      reading of
      > 0.805, temp corrected to 0.806 works out to ~92% abv.



      >>>>>>>>>>>>>I know what you mean, and what you're trying to
      achieve. But it can only be at best a broad approximation, not an
      accurate measurement, for the reasons stated above. Buy an
      alcoholmeter. They're not much more expensive than a fermentation
      hydrometer. Then check your measurements using both. You'll see
      big differences as the percentage of ethanol reduces. And the
      comparison scale isn't linear, either. That's why it's impossible
      to produce a chart to swap between one and the other.


      Slainte!
      regards Harry
    • Trid
      Random thought as I spied a bag of bulk cous-cous that s gone unused for nearly a year: Are the starches in pasta readily convertable with a little 6-row?
      Message 32 of 32 , May 11, 2006
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        Random thought as I spied a bag of bulk cous-cous that's gone unused for nearly
        a year:
        Are the starches in pasta readily convertable with a little 6-row? Anybody
        ever try? I'm going to take a stab at it...meanwhile, if I'm making a horrible
        mistake here, please feel free to point, giggle, and sooner or later let me
        know :)

        Trid
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